1. Introduction: The Rising Tide of Climate Change Fiction
  2. Stef Craps, Rick Crownshaw
  3. pp. 1-8
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0000
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. Beauty That Must Die: Station Eleven, Climate Change Fiction, and the Life of Form
  2. Pieter Vermeulen
  3. pp. 9-25
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0001
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. The Rest Is Silence: Postmodern and Postcolonial Possibilities in Climate Change Fiction
  2. Adeline Johns-Putra
  3. pp. 26-42
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0002
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. The Hot War: Climate, Security, Fiction
  2. Ben De Bruyn
  3. pp. 43-67
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0003
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. Tearing Down the Greenhouse: Visual Ecology, Savvy Critics, and Climate Change in T. C. Boyle’s The Terranauts
  2. River Ramuglia
  3. pp. 68-85
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0004
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. From the Grotesque to Nuclear-Age Precedents: The Modes and Meanings of Cli-fi Humor
  2. Courtney Traub
  3. pp. 86-107
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0005
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. The Novel after Nature, Nature after the Novel: Richard Jefferies’s Anthropocene Romance
  2. Jesse Oak Taylor
  3. pp. 108-133
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0006
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. Contemporary Fiction vs. the Challenge of Imagining the Timescale of Climate Change
  2. Mahlu Mertens, Stef Craps
  3. pp. 134-153
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0007
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. Cli-fi, Petroculture, and the Environmental Humanities: An Interview with Stephanie LeMenager
  2. River Ramuglia
  3. pp. 154-164
  4. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0008
  5. free access View | Download |
  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 165-166
  3. DOI: 10.1353/sdn.2018.0009
  4. free access View | Download |