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Subject Index 237 assessment: accountability, 128; accuracy and fairness, 114, 119–120; alternative, 135–140, 141; analytic scoring, 118; authenticity, 119, 129–131; bias, 119, 120; complexity of, 120; conflicting roles of teachers, 136; constraints, 116, 141; by construct, 130–131; context-sensitive, 123, 124, 128; criteria for, 118, 126, 128, 159–160; critiques of psychometricians, 122–123; culture of, 113; direct, 117, 121; ethics of, 131–134, 141; evaluation, 114; face validity, 121; and genre familiarity, 134; high-stakes, 134; holistic (see holistic scoring issues); indirect, 117, 121; informal, 128; and instruction, 136, 140; large-scale, 124, 128; liking, 128; local (see assessment, contextsensitive ); and L1 writing ability, 134; and L2 language proficiency, 133; meaningfulness, 119–120; meaning of, 114; measurement, 114; measures, 122; objectivity, 120–123; and pedagogy, 128; performance-based, 135–136; portfolio (see portfolio assessment); purposes of, 115–116, 141; reliability, 122, 123 (see also rater issues, reliability); rubrics, 118; scoring problems, 117, 121 (see also holistic scoring issues); selfassessment , 140; single-sample problem, 120; by skill, 130; social and political aspects, 132–133; source-based, 135–136; subjectivity, 120–121; by task, 130; and technology, 142; terms, 114; test, 114; validity, 122, 123, 127, 132; washback, 116. See also rater issues audience, 157, 158–170, 185; arguments against, 168–170; electronic, 163–168; expectations, 159–160 (see also contrastive rhetoric, reader expectations; rater issues); imagined, 157, 159–163; peer, 157–158; real, 157, 159–163, 170, 180–182; teacher as, 159, 160, 170 beliefs, 8–11, 54–55, 96–97, 129, 141, 142, 186–187, 197, 199, 200, 206, 223, 224; sources of, 11–15 citation practices, 175–176. See also textual borrowing classroom perspectives, 43–52, 92–94, 134–140, 180–186, 218–224 context sensitivity, 199. See also assessment, context-sensitive contrastive rhetoric, 26–62; Chinese counterfactuals, 28–29, 39; Chinese essay, 37; classroom perspectives, 43–52; comparability of texts, 29, 40, 46, 47, 48; context sensitivity, 40; critics’ responses, 33–39; cultural patterns, 30; deductive and inductive styles, 34, 36, 37; defenders, 39–41; discourse of, 53; ethnocentrism, 33; expanded agenda, 39–41, 42; extratextual influences, 30, 37, 41–42, 54; genre features, 47–48; heteroglossia, 38, 39; ideological implications, 42; influence of schooling, 37, 38, 40, 53–54; investigative pedagogical approach, 45–52; Kaplan’s 1966 article, 27, 31–32; ki-shoo-ten-ketsu, 34, 36; linguistic relativity, 29, 37; logical contrastive rhetoric (continued) thinking, 27, 53; multilingual research, 41; myth of linguistic purity, 38; paragraph structure, 28, 32, 38, 47; pedagogical goals, 28, 32, 41, 44; pedagogical knowledge, 43–44; pedagogical techniques, 45; pragmatic intent, 38–39; reader expectations, 34, 35, 44, 46, 49–52; roots, 28; rhetorical traditions, 29, 33; Sapir-Whorf principle, 28, 29–30, 37–38; sources of textual differences, 53; stereotypes, 36, 46, 52, 54; structure and organization, 29–30; textual focus, 44 copyright. See plagiarism critical language testing, 133 critical pedagogy, 199–205 critical thinking, 205–211; and agency, 211; and composition textbooks, 207, 208; contradictions in arguments, 210; culture-specific, 206–207, 208, 210; culture-neutral, 210; dialogical, 209; difficulty of defining, 209, 211; discipline-specific, 208; and education, 209, 210; generalizability of, 208; monological, 209; universal, 206; stereotyping, 211; suitability of class activities, 207 decision making, 1, 131, 163, 199, 206, 223; criteria, 3, 31; kinds of decisions, 7–8 decision-making framework, 7–25; literacy autobiographies, 10–11; philosophy of teaching and learning, 10–15; sources of beliefs, 11–15 dilemmas, 21, 64, 65, 75, 94, 117, 120, 128, 131, 136, 140, 157–158, 159, 166, 173, 184, 211 EAP (English for Academic Purposes), 118, 200–202, 204, 211; and pragmatism, 201 electronic communication and technology, 163–168 (see also interaction, electronic); and authoritative voice, 165; benefits of, 164, 166–168, 213, 217; as culturally infused, 215; disadvantages of, 165, 167, 217; as divider, 214; equal access issue, 216; as equalizer, 212–213, 214–215; gender issues, 217; and hearing-impaired students, 164–165, 219–223; and identity, 165, 166, 218; Internet technology, 198, 211–218; and intertextuality, 179; local area network (LAN), 166–168; and L2 students, 165; myth of technology as apolitical, 214; online education, 213; and plagiarism, 178–179; and power, 166, 222; resistance of teachers, 216; styles of communication, 217; technooppression , 214; and writing quality, 166–168 email. See interaction, electronic; electronic communication and technology error correction debate, 64, 69–70, 86–92; evidence/lack of evidence of value of error correction, 87–88; necessity of error treatment...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780472029815
Related ISBN
9780472089796
MARC Record
OCLC
844924476
Pages
264
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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