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volume 17, number 1, april 2006 nbr analysis Informing and Strengthening Policy in the Asia-Pacific Foreword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Richard J. Ellings China’s Search for Energy Security: Implications for U.S. Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Kenneth Lieberthal and Mikkal Herberg [This page intentionally left blank.] 3 Foreword Over the years I have pointed out that China’s rise as a global power is likely to be the most significant event in international affairs in the 21st century. One dimension of China’s growing impact is its rapid emergence as a major force in world energy markets and global energy geopolitics. Beijing’s booming energy consumption and intensifying search for energy security have raised a new range of contentious issues between China and the United States that are adding a new layer of issues to an already complex and dynamic relationship. The clearest example of growing problems was the Congressional furorsurroundingtheChinaNationalOffshoreOilCompany’s(CNOOC)bidforU.S.oil company Unocal last summer, but there are also added U.S. concerns revolving around China’s growing energy ties with energy-rich problem states, such as Iran and the Sudan, and apparent efforts to “lock up” equity oil supplies around the globe. Alternatively, from China’s perspective, the Congressional furor over the CNOOC-Unocal bid and U.S. opposition to its involvement in problem states confirm the view of many in Beijing that the United States is intent on blocking China’s efforts to secure future energy supplies. In sum, energy now is adding a new layer of mistrust and suspicion to U.S.China relations that threatens to further undermine efforts to forge a cooperative and constructive long-term relationship. This issue of the NBR Analysis examines China’s global search for energy security, draws implications for U.S. global energy and security interests, and recommends policies that the authors contend will allow the United States to respond more effectively to China’s expanding global energy impact. Kenneth Lieberthal and Mikkal Herberg bring an exceptional blend of experience from government, business, and academe to the special study. Kenneth Lieberthal is currently Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan and formerly Senior Director for Asia on the National Security Council. Mikkal Herberg is Director of the Asian Energy Security Program at NBR and previously spent twenty years in international strategic planning roles for a major U.S. oil company. NBR wishes to thank The Henry M. Jackson Foundation and The William Davidson InstituteoftheUniversityofMichiganfortheirgeneroussupportforandco-sponsorship of the research for this study, and to express appreciation to the U.S. Department of 4 Energy, ExxonMobil Corporation, The Pacific Northwest Center for Global Security, and National Defense University for their support of the September 2005 conference in Washington, D.C., where the groundwork for the project was developed. Richard J. Ellings President The National Bureau of Asian Research 5 China’s Search for Energy Security: Implications for U.S. Policy* Kenneth Lieberthal and Mikkal Herberg Kenneth Lieberthal is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Political Science, William Davidson Professor of Business Administration at the Ross School of Business, Distinguished Fellow and Director for China at The William Davidson Institute, and Research Associate of the China Center at the University of Michigan. He can be reached at . Mikkal Herberg is Director of the Asian Energy Security program at The National Bureau of Asian Research. He served as Director for Global Energy and Economics in the Strategic Planning group at ARCO, where he was responsible for worldwide energy, economic, and political analysis. He can be reached at . * The authors would like to thank The Henry M. Jackson Foundation and The William Davidson Institute of the University of Michigan for their generous support of the research for this study. 6 Executive Summary This report examines China’s global search for energy security, draws implications for U.S. global energy and security interests, and recommends policies that will allow the United States to respond more effectively to China’s expanding global energy impact. Main Argument: China is rapidly emerging as a major force in both world energy markets and global energy geopolitics, and key aspects of China’s new global energy activities are creating new challenges for U.S.-China relations. As the world’s two largest energy consumers, however, the United States and China share key common interests in the energy sector. Both nations can benefit if improved cooperation replaces the current drift toward a competitive energy relationship. The issue of trust will inevitably weigh heavily in determining future...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781939131232
MARC Record
OCLC
868219195
Pages
166
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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