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Notes Introduction 1. Philip H. Manson-Bahr and A. Alcock, The Life and Work ofSirPatrick Manson (London: Cassell, 1927); Philip H. Manson-Bahr, Patrick Manson: The Father of Tropical Medicine (London: Thomas Nelson, 1962). 2. See Philip H. Manson-Bahr,History ofthe School ofTropicalMedicine, 18991949 (London: London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Memoir II: H. K. Lewis, 1956), 234. 3. By 1914 Manson's textbook Tropical Diseases: A Manual of the Diseases of Warm Climates (London: Cassell, 1898) had reached five editions. Manson asked Manson-Bahr to assume the editorship in 1919. "You might see the editor of Cassell's about a new edition of Tropical Diseases. This I would like you to bring out as Manson 's Manual ofTropical Disease edited by Philip H. Bahr." See Manson to Manson-Bahr, 10 June 1919. Sir Patrick Manson Papers, Correspondence, F. 33, Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine. The investigation into the life history of the filaria worm represented a major area of research for Manson. Manson-Bahr's first monograph reflected this interest. See Filariasis andElephantiasis inFiji; Being a Report to the London School ofTropical Medicine (London: Witherby, 1912). Fbr Manson-Bahr's marriage, see certificate in Sir Patrick Manson Papers, Folder 1Personal and Biographical, box 25, Contemporary Medical Archives, Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine. 4. Raphael Blanchard, a parasitologist at the University ofParis, first hailed Manson as "father" of tropical medicine at the presentation of a special medal to Manson at the 1913 International Congress of Medicine in London. See Manson-Bahr and Alcock, Life and Work, 226. On Manson-Bahr's efforts, see "The Dawn of Tropical Medicine, Beinga BriefAccount ofthe Life andWork ofSirPatrick Manson, 1844-1922,"Journal of Tropical Medicine 34, no. 7 (1April1931): 93-97; "Centenaryofthe Birth ofPatrick Manson ," Transactions ofthe Royal Society of Tropical Medicine andHygiene 38, no. 6 (July 1945): 401-417; and "Patrick Manson as a Parasitologist," International Review ofTropical Medicine 1 (1961): 77-129. 5. Manson-Bahr and Alcock uses the term "lad of parts" Life and Work, 2. See also Manson-Bahr,PatrickManson, 3. For a sustained analysis of this national myth as it relates to education in Scotland, see R. D. Anderson, Education and Opportunity in Victorian Scotland (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1983). 182 NOTES TO PAGES 3-6 6. Manson-Bahr and Alcock, Life and Work, 5; Manson-Bahr, PatrickManson, 5. 7. Manson-Bahr and Alcock, Life and Work, 8-23, 24-37; Manson-Bahr, Patrick Manson, 10, 12, and 14-15. 8. Manson-Bahr and Alcock,Life and Work, 90-103; Manson-Bahr, PatrickManson , 48-57. 9. Fbr example, see Manson-Bahr "The Dawn of Tropical Medicine"; Shelia Wilmot , ed., Medical Entomology Centenary: Symposium Proceedings, Royal Society of Tropical Medicine (London: Royal Society of Tropical Medicine, 1978), 7; Bruce F. Eldridge, "Memorial Lecture: Patrick Manson and the Discovery Age ofVector Biology," Journal oftheAmericanMosquito Control Association 8, no.1 (March 1992): 215-19; and L. G. Goh and K. H. Phua, "'By Whose Efforts the Tropics Have Been Made Safe': The Work of Patrick Manson," Asia Pacific Journal ofPublic Health 1, no. 2 (1987): 84-90. 10. The term is from Charles Morrow Wilson, Ambassadors in White: The Story ofAmerican Tropical Medicine (New York: Henry Holt, 1942). 11. Manson-Bahr,PatrickManson, 1-2. 12. I discuss this perspective in the epilogue. 13. See M. Jeanne Peterson, The Medical Profession in Mid-Victorian London (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1978); Irvine Loudon, Medical Care and the GeneralPractitioner, 1750-1850 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1986); Anne Digby,Making a Medical Living: Doctors and Patients in the English Market for Medicine, 17201911 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994); Peter Bartrip,MirrorofMedicine: A History oftheBritishMedical Journal, 1840-1990 (Oxford: Oxford UniversityPress, 1990); and Peter Bartrip, Themselves Writ Large: The British Medical Association, 1832-1966 (London: BMJ, 1996). 14. Fbr recent representative works, see David Arnold, Colonizing the Body (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993); Mark Harrison, Public Health in BritishIndia:Anglo-IndianPreventiveMedicine, 1859-1914 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994); Anil Kumar, Medicine and the Raj: British Medical Policy in India, 1835-1911 (Walnut Creek, Calif.: Altamira, 1998); David Arnold, ed., Imperial Medicine andIndigenous Societies (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1989); and Roy MacLeod and Milton Lewis, eds., Diseases, Medicine, and Empire: Perspectives on Western Medicine and the Experience of European Expansion (London: Routledge, 1988). 15. For exceptions to this tendency in British, French, and American historiography , see David Cantor, "Cortisone and the Politics of Empire: Imperialism and British Medicine," Bulletin of the History...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780812202212
Related ISBN
9780812235982
MARC Record
OCLC
859160751
Pages
240
Launched on MUSE
2014-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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