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163 Notes Intro­ duc­ tion 1. The ­ phrase was ­ coined by the jour­ nal­ ist Eo­ ghan Har­ ris in the ­ course of the 1997 Irish pres­ i­ den­ tial elec­ tion; while he con­ tin­ ued to af­ firm the state­ ment as an ex­ pres­ sion of his view of ­ McAleese at the time, he later ad­ mit­ ted that her pres­ i­ dency had not con­ formed to his pre­ dic­ tion and that she had “al­ layed my fears and ­ aroused my ad­ mi­ ra­ tion and even af­ fec­ tion” (Sun­ day In­ de­ pen­ dent, 19 June 2011). 2. Irish Daily Mail, 23 Oct. 2010; Irish Times, 23 Oct. 2010. 3. The ter­ mi­ nol­ ogy re­ flects dif­ fer­ ing inter­ pre­ ta­ tions. As ­ William J. Smyth put it, “from most Irish ­ points of view the event is an up­ ris­ ing; from the Brit­ ish point of view it is a re­ bel­ lion.” See ­ William J. Smyth, ­ Map-Making, Land­ scapes, and Mem­ ory: A Geog­ ra­ phy of Co­ lo­ nial and Early Mod­ ern Ire­ land, c. 1530–1750 (Cork, 2006), 105. The use of the term “re­ bel­ lion” in the title of the cur­ rent work is based on its def­i­ ni­ tion in the Ox­ ford ­ American Dic­ tion­ ary as “an act of vi­ o­ lent or open re­ sis­ tance to an es­ tab­ lished govern­ ment or order”—a def­i­ ni­ tion that is suf­ fi­ ciently neu­ tral to be ap­ pro­ pri­ ate to the ­ events of 1641. For de­ tailed mod­ ern ac­ counts of 1641, on which my dis­ cus­ sion draws ­ freely, see Mi­ chael­ Perceval-Maxwell, The Out­ break of the Irish Re­ bel­ lion of 1641 (Mon­ treal, 1994); Nich­ o­ las Canny, Mak­ ing Ire­ land Brit­ ish, 1580–1650 (Ox­ ford, 2001), 461–550; Smyth, ­ Map-Making, Land­ scapes, and Mem­ ory, 103–65. 4. Brian Mac ­ Cuarta, “Re­ li­ gious Vi­ o­ lence ­ against Set­ tlers in South Ul­ ster, 1641–2,” in Age of Atroc­ ity: Vi­ o­ lent Death and Po­ lit­ i­ cal Con­ flict in Early Mod­ ern Ire­ land, ed. David Ed­ wards, Pa­ draig Len­ i­ han, and Clo­ dagh Tait (Dub­ lin, 2007), 154–75. 5. A Brief Nar­ ra­ tive of the Sev­ eral Pop­ ish Trea­ sons and Cruel­ ties ­ against the Prot­ es­ tants in En­ gland, ­ France, and Ire­ land (Lon­ don, [1678]), 1. 6. Ibid., 4–5. 7. Cited in David Fitz­ pa­ trick, “‘I Will Ac­ quire an At­ ti­ tude Not ­ Yours’: Was Frede­ rick Mac­ niece a Home Ruler and Why Does This Mat­ ter?” Field Day Re­ view 4 (2008): 160. 164 Notes to pages 7–12 8. A. T. Q. Stew­ art, The Nar­ row ­ Ground: As­ pects of Ul­ ster, 1609–1969 (Lon­ don, 1977), 48–49. 9. Wal­ ter Love, “Charles ­ O’Conor of Be­ lan­ a­ gare and ­ Thomas ­ Leland’s ‘Philosophi­ cal’ His­ tory of Ire­ land,” Irish His­ tor­ i­ cal Stud­ ies 13, no. 49 (Mar. 1962): 1. 10. See Toby Bar­ nard, “The Uses of the 23rd of Oc­ to­ ber 1641 and Irish Prot­ es­ tant Cel­ e­ bra­ tions,” En­ glish His­ tor­ i­ cal Re­ view 106 (Oct. 1991): 889–920; James Kelly, “‘The Glo­ ri­ ous and Im­ mor­ tal ­ Memory’: Com­ memora­ tion and Prot­ es­ tant Iden­ tity in Ire­ land, 1660–1800,” Pro­ ceed­ ings of the Royal Irish Acad­ emy 94C/2 (1994): 25–52. 11. See [ John Curry], A Brief Ac­ count from the Most Au­ then­ tic Prot­ es­ tant Writ­ ers of the­ Causes, Mo­ tives, and Mis­ chiefs of the Irish Re­ bel­ lion on the 23rd Day of Oc­ to­ ber 1641, ­ Deliver’d in a Di­ alogue ­ between a Dis­ senter and a Mem­ ber of the ­ Church of Ire­ land as by Law Es­ tab­ lished (Lon­ don, 1747); idem, His­ tor­ i­ cal Me­ moirs of the Irish Re­ bel­ lion in the Year 1641; Ex­ tracted from Par­ lia­ men­ tary Jour­ nals, ­ State-Acts, and the Most Em­ i­ nent Prot­ es­ tant His­ to­ rians . . . in a Let­ ter to Wal­ ter Har­ ris, Esq. (Lon­ don, 1758); idem, Oc­ ca­ sional Re­ marks on Cer­ tain Pas­ sages in Dr. ­ Leland’s His­ tory of Ire...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780299289539
Related ISBN
9780299289546
MARC Record
OCLC
859686981
Pages
224
Launched on MUSE
2013-05-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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