publisher colophon

INDEX

Albany Argus, 145, 158, 181, 264

Albany State Register, 26, 181, 261

Alcott, Louisa May, 202, 255, 310

Alden, William Livingston, 199–200

Alexander’s Weekly Messenger, 106, 113

Allen, James, 21

Allston, Washington, 45–46

Altick, Richard, 19

American fiction: book production, 19

history, xiii

reception, x

writers, 171, 204–5, 207, 208

American Ladies Magazine, 205, 212, 216, 225, 227, 237–38, 243

American Literary Gazette, 176, 292

American Monthly Magazine, 234

American Quarterly Review, 241

American Review, 122, 131

American Tract Society, 24, 290

American Whig Review, 130, 137, 146, 153, 160, 185–86, 261, 266

Amy Carr (Chesebro’): publication, 290

reviewer neglect of, 290

Anderson, John, 302

Anglo American Magazine, 143

anonymous publication, 191, 205

Appleseed, Johnny, 25

Appleton’s Journal, 291

Arthur, T. S., 128

Arthur’s Home Journal, 288

Arthur’s Home Magazine, 287

“Assignation, The” (Poe), 97

Atlantic Magazine, 215, 216, 219

Atlantic Monthly, 257, 259, 285, 303, 305, 306–7

Atlas, 156, 197

audience, informed, 95, 132

Augusta Chronicle, 97, 101

authors as readers, 16

“Balloon Hoax, The” (Poe), 132

Baltimore American and Commercial Advertiser, 187

Baltimore Athenaeum, 102

Baltimore Patriot, 101, 102

Baltimore Repository,167

Baltimore Republican, 96, 104

Baltimore Saturday Visitor, 103

Balzac, Honore de, 75

“Bargain Lost, The” (Poe), 97

Barthes, Roland, 52, 65

Baym, Nina, 47, 59, 66, 203, 207

Beard, Charles, 315

Beautiful Gate, The (Chesebro’): publication history, 274

reception of, 275–76

Becker, Carl, 315

Beers, Henry, 300

Bell, Currer, 77

Bell, Henry, 98

Bell, Michael Davitt, 219, 299–300, 308, 313

Bellows, Reverend Dr., 245–46

Bennett, Tony, 311–12

Bentley, Richard, 156

correspondence with Melville, 162, 174, 184

“Berenice” (Poe), 97–98, 105, 110

Berkshire County Eagle, 195

Bertoff, Warner, 300

Bérubé, Michael, 8

Biblical Repository, 167

Bird, Robert, 48, 90

“Black Cat, The” (Poe), 123, 124, 125, 127, 132, 136

Blackwood’s, 101, 130, 131, 156

Blessings in Disguise (Chesebro’), 285–86

Bok, Edward, 199 “Bon Bon” (Poe), 101

Boston Daily Bee, 175

Boston Evening Gazette, 106

Boston Evening Transcript, 167, 193–94

Boston Harbinger, 134, 148, 150

Boston Observer, 234

Boston Pearl, 239

Boston Post, 146, 161, 165, 182, 189, 190

Boston Universalist Review, 145–46

Bourdieu, Pierre, 27, 297

Boyesen, Hjalmer, 300, 308

Boy of Mt. Rhigi (Sedgwick), 249, 250

reception of, 245–46

Boynton, Percy, 254

Bremer, Fredrika, 71

Britannia, 156

Broadhead, Richard, 163

Broadway Journal, 87

Bronson, Walter C., 255, 295

Brooks, Van Wyck, 254

Brownson’s Quarterly Review, 305

Bryant, William Cullen, 253

Buell, Lawrence, 139, 206, 223

Bulwer-Lytton, Edward, 50, 53, 54, 60, 64, 82, 90

plot, 62–63

reading character, 76–77

Burdett, Charles, 56

Burlington (Vermont) Free Press, 194

Burlington (Vermont) Sentinel, 195

Burton, Richard, 254, 295

Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine, 87

Cabot, Eliza, 213–14

Cairns, William B., 255

Carleton, George, 285

Carleton and Porter, 257, 285, 286, 290

Carlyle, Thomas, 187

Cayuga Chief, 275

Century Magazine, 301, 303, 310

Certeau, Michel de, 315

Channing, Susan, 208, 214, 228, 229

Channing, William Ellery, 208

Charleston Mercury, 190

Charleston Southern Patriot, 142

Charlottesville Jeffersonian, 102

Charvat, William, 32, 170

Chase, Richard, 300

Chesebro’, Caroline, 32, 34, 259

Amy Carr, 290

audience expectations, 261-62

The Beautiful Gate, 274–76

Blessings in Disguise, 285–86

characterization, 265, 266, 270–71, 282–83, 287–88, 289, 293

Children of Light, 292, 296

compared to Hawthorne, 258, 278, 284, 293

correspondence, 258, 259–60

death, 294–95

domestic fiction, 261, 289

Dream-Land by Daylight, 260, 263

economic motivation as author, 258–59

The Fishermen of Gamp’s Island, 257–58, 290

The Foe in the Household, 291–94

Glen Cabin, 258, 290, 291

historical fiction, 281

horizon of expectations for, 260–61, 270, 276, 297

Isa, A Pilgrimage, 263–70, 274, 292, 296

The Little Crossbearers, 274–75

local color, 282, 294

obscurity, 256–57, 297–98

Peter Carradine, or the Martindale Pastoral, 286–90

plot, 265–66, 270, 281–83

psychological fiction, 264–65, 268

publication history, 257, 260, 263, 270, 274–75, 280–81, 285–86, 290–91

publisher relationships, 296–97

realism, 262, 287, 288, 289, 293–94, 296, 298

reception of, xi, 260–85, 286–94

religious issues, 283–84

royalties, 259

sales, 258, 260

short stories, 257, 260–63, 274, 275, 285, 290, 294

Sparrow’s Fall, 290, 291

status, 256–58, 260, 295–98

style, 260, 262–64, 273, 276–77, 281, 292, 295–96, 298

theme, 266–69, 272–73, 283–84, 292

verisimilitude, 265–66, 277–78, 287, 293–94, 296, 298

Victoria, or the World Overcome, 281–85, 296

Children of Light (Chesebro’), 292, 296

reception of, 270–74

Chopin, Kate, 201, 202, 296, 312

Chorley, Henry, 114

Christian Examiner, 192, 241, 247, 250, 268, 290, 305

Christian Freemen, 264

Christian Inquirer, 195

Church Bizarre, 185

Cincinnati Morning Herald, 144, 148

Clarence (Sedgwick), 204, 207, 228, 233, 238, 241, 243, 246, 249, 255

reception of, 229–32, 242, 254

Clark, Beverly Lyon, 247

Clark, Louis Gaylord, 135, 136

codes: contemporary reading, 34

cultural, 72

hermeneutic, 52–54

interpretive, 7, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17, 31, 32, 47, 74, 83–84, 88, 89, 92

privileged position, 54

representational, 76, 153, 162

uniformity, 90. See also reading, informed

Confidence-Man (Melville), 141

reception of, 194–97

sales, 197–98

writing of, 193

Continental Monthly, 288, 289

Cooke, John, 51

Cooke, Philip, 115–16, 118–19, 120, 132

Cooper, James Fenimore, 55–56, 89, 90, 201–2, 254, 305–6, 308

depiction of Indians, 225

national American novelist, 216–17

reading character, 72

reading plot conventions, 50

realism, 301–4

Coulter, John, 143–44

Coultrap-McQuin, Susan, 206, 256

Culler, Jonathan, 7, 31

Cummins, Maria, 28, 252, 296

Curtis, George, 48, 192, 300

Daily Alta California, 281

Dain, Norman, 124

Damon-Bach, Lucinda, 217–18

Dana, Richard Henry, 165, 168, 170, 173

Davidson, Cathy N., 19

Davis, Rebecca Harding, 256, 294, 295, 306, 308

Dawes, Anna, 300

death, attitudes toward, 112

DeBow’s Review, 20, 30, 39, 41, 43, 58, 65, 148

DeFoe, Daniel, 48, 113, 144, 146, 155

Derby, James, 275, 276, 281

Derby, Orton, and Mulligan, 274

Derby and Jackson, 281, 285, 286

Derby and Miller, 274

Derrida, Jacques, 8, 12, 311, 314, 316

“Descent into the Maelstrom, The” (Poe), 121, 123

“Devil in the Belfry, The” (Poe), 121

Dewey, Mary, 253

Dewey, Orville, 253

Dickens, Charles, 19, 57, 63, 64, 77, 78, 89, 304, 308

Poe as reviewer of, 89

reading character, 72

realism, 306–7

satire and burlesque, 57–59

“Diddling” (Poe), 121

Dimock, Wai-chee, 140

Disraeli, Benjamin, 98

Dodd, Mead, and Company, 290

Dodd, M. W., 290

Douglas, Ann, 140, 184, 206, 220, 256

Dream-Land by Daylight (Chesebro’): audience expectations, 261

female readers, 261–62

publication history, 260

reception of, 260–63

style, 262–63

success, 262

“Duc de L’Omelette, The” (Poe), 97, 98

Dupin stories (Poe), 88, 122, 123, 131, 132. See also Poe: “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”

Poe: “The Mystery of Maria Rogét”

Duyckinck, Evert Augustus: correspondence with Melville, 163, 164, 170, 183

as defender of Omoo, 153

as editor of Poe’s Tales (1845), 123

as patron of Melville, 153

as Wiley and Putnam editor, 123

Duyckinck, George, 145

Duyckinck brothers, correspondence with Chesebro’, 259

Eco, Umberto, 10–11

Edgeworth, Maria, 74, 210

Edinburgh Review, 210

“Elenora” (Poe), 137

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 208, 258

Evans, Augusta, 52

Eveleth, George, 133, 135

Examiner, 165

“Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar, The” (Poe), 132–33, 134

“Fall of the House of Usher, The” (Poe), 106, 110, 114–15, 119

Fay, Theodore S., 56, 98

Fern, Fanny (Sarah Payson Willis), 274

Fielding, Henry, 75

Fish, Stanley: historical inquiry, 316, 317

response and reception theory, 8

Fishermen of Gamp’s Island, The (Chesebro’), 257–58, 290

Fiske, John, 31

Flag of Our Union, 42

Foe in the Household, The (Chesebro’): as art, 293–94

publication history, 291–92

realism, 293–94

reception of, 292–93

success, 292–93

Forum, 308

Foucault, Michel, 15

Freeman, Mary Wilkins, 295

Frow, John, 31, 311–12

Fulbrook, Mary, 315, 319

Galaxy Magazine, 259–60, 291

genres, fiction: advocacy, 32, 55, 56–57, 127, 146, 148, 166–69, 212–13

antebellum popularity, 19, 28–30

criminal, 124–30

gothic (Germanic) tales, 96-101, 103, 105, 106–11, 113, 114, 122, 123, 126, 131, 134, 135, 186–87

vs history and philosophy, 41

postbellum realism, 299–311

satire and burlesque, 57–59, 96–99, 101, 103, 106, 110

social criticism, 56–57

travel, 143–44

Germanic (gothic) fiction, 96, 101, 103, 105, 106–11, 113, 114, 122, 123, 126, 131, 134, 135, 186–87

Glazener, Nancy, 301, 306, 313

Glen Cabin (Chesebro’), 258, 290-91

Glover, Caroline, 60

Godey’s Lady’s Book, 20, 29, 30, 36–37, 39, 44, 48, 50, 52–53, 55–57, 60–62, 64–65, 70, 72–74, 77, 81–83

and Chesebro’, 257, 260–62, 271, 280

and Melville, 185

and Poe, 89, 96

and Sedgwick, 203, 206, 207, 222, 238, 240, 242

“Gold Bug, The” (Poe), 88

Goodrich, Diana, 15

Graham’s Magazine, 20, 30, 36, 40–41, 43–44, 49–50, 54–56, 60, 66, 68, 71, 76, 82–83, 302, 305

and Chesebro’, 257, 263, 264, 272, 280

and Melville, 150, 158, 161, 165, 176, 186, 190

and Poe, 87, 89, 96, 125, 134

and Sedgwick, 203, 215, 244

Greenblatt, Stephen, ix, 316

Griswold, Rufus Wilmot, 136–37

Habeggar, Alfred, 300

“Hans Pfaall” (Poe), 96, 97, 102, 104–5, 113

Harland, Marian, 77

Harper Brothers (publisher), 18, 104, 157, 169, 181, 184, 189, 198, 203, 239, 248, 250, 257

Harper’s New Monthly Magazine, 20, 44–45, 52, 57–58, 60, 64, 69, 72, 77, 304

and Chesebro’, 257, 261, 262, 265, 268, 277, 278, 279, 283, 284, 285, 287, 288, 291, 293, 294

and Melville, 175, 177, 178, 180, 181, 191

and Sedgwick, 252

Harper’s Weekly, 251

Harte, Bret, 295

Hartford Courant, 178, 288

Haven, Alice, 65

Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 33, 53–55, 60

allegory, 62

compared to Chesebro’, 258, 278, 284, 293

Poe as reviewer of, 91-93, 95

reading character, 67–68

realism, 304–5

relationship with Melville, 139, 140, 164, 170, 171–73, 174, 182

Hawthorne, Sophia, 148, 174, 181

“Hawthorne and His Mosses” (Melville), 139, 140, 163–64, 170-73

Heath, John, 115

hermeneutics, historical, 14, 17-18, 35, 137, 299, 314, 318–20

communal practices, 7

implications, 7–8, 9, 18, 200

patterns of interpretation, 7

production and reception, 15

and Sedgwick, 201

theory of, 8-18. See also reception, theory of

reception study

Higham, John, 23

Hill, Harrison, 104

history: of the book and reading, 6–7

interpretive turn, 315–16

problematics, 313–16

textuality, 314–15

theory of, 314–15

Hoffman, Daniel, 110, 121

Holden’s Dollar Magazine, 160, 257–58

Home (Sedgwick): commissioned, 233

reception of, 233–35

Home Journal, 29, 39, 44, 48, 51, 57–58, 59–60, 61, 72, 73

and Chesebro’, 262–63

and Melville, 151, 158, 165, 177, 186

Hope Leslie (Sedgwick), 201, 204, 205, 207, 208, 229, 233, 234, 235–37, 243, 248

historical novel, 219, 221–22

Indians, 221–22, 223-27

Puritans, 222–23

reception of, 220–28, 238, 240, 247, 249, 255

sales, 245

success, 228

horizon of expectations, 17, 18, 83. See also Chesebro’

Melville

Poe

Sedgwick

Howells, William Dean, 258, 295, 299, 300, 307–11, 312

Hugo, Victor, 285

Hunt’s Merchant Magazine, 143, 187

Illustrated New Monthly, 194, 196–97

implied readers, 43, 44, 45, 47, 66, 78, 83, 139, 141, 146, 156, 188, 243

Independent, 287, 288

interpretation, object of, 9–14

interpretive assumptions, antebellum: adaptability, 82–83

characters, 40, 70–80

control, 92

gendered, 80–82

instructional, 40–41

morality, 40, 66

narrative and narrator, 66–69, 100, 124–30

pacing, 53

plot, 40, 45, 49–55, 59–61, 66, 90, 119, 161, 177–78, 186, 196, 215–16, 218–19, 265, 266, 270, 277, 281, 283, 284, 286–87, 292, 293, 295, 303, 313

reproductive response, 69–70. See also reading, informed

interpretive community, 5, 7, 14, 15, 31.

See also reading formations

interpretive practices, 31, 32, 46, 52, 84, 89, 91, 111, 204, 298

postbellum, 299

realism, 312. See also interpretive assumptions, antebellum

reading, informed

Irving, Washington, 115, 202, 254

Isa, A Pilgrimage (Chesebro’), 274, 296

reception of, 263–70, 292

Iser, Wolfgang, 61

Israel Potter (Melville), 191

reception of, 192

James, G. P. R., 66, 82

James, Henry, 258, 300, 305–7, 309, 310–11, 311, 312

Jameson, Frederick, 319

Jauss, Hans Robert, 5, 17

Jewett, Sarah Orne, 202, 295, 312

John Bull, 156

“Journal of Julius Rodman, The” (Poe), 121, 123

Juvenile Miscellany, 243

Kaplan, Amy, 316

Katznelson, Ira, 22

Kelley, Mary, 204–5, 221, 256, 258

Kellner, Hans, 316

Kennedy, J. P., 90, 103–6

“King Pest” (Poe), 97, 98, 101, 104

Kintgen, Eugene R., 31

Knickerbocker Magazine: and Chesebro’, 257, 263, 267–69, 276–77, 282–84

and Melville, 154, 193

and Poe, 113, 134–35

and Sedgwick, 203, 237, 241–42, 245, 251

LaCapra, Dominick, 314, 315

Laderman, Greg, 112

Ladies’ Repository, 29, 36, 40–41, 42, 76, 250–51

Lansingburg Gazette, 187

Lea and Blanchard, 109

Leisy, Ernest, E., 255

Lever, Charles, 88

Lewes, G. H., 55

“Ligeia” (Poe), 106, 110, 114, 115–19, 120, 136, 137

Linwoods, The (Sedgwick), 243

reception of, 235–40, 242, 254

“Lionizing” (Poe), 101, 104

literacy: ideology of, 23–24

U.S., 21–22

Literary and Scientific Repository, 210–11

Literary Digest, 40, 41, 43–44, 49–50, 54–56, 60, 66, 68, 71, 83, 303

Literary Gazette, 122

“Literary Life of Thingum Bob, Esq., The” (Poe), 121

Literary World: and Chesebro’, 257, 259, 266, 271, 273, 276

and Melville, 143, 158, 159, 161, 165, 175–79, 180, 183, 185, 187–88, 189, 193

and Sedgwick, 230, 232, 246, 249

Littell’s Living Age, 27, 53, 61–62, 63, 64, 71, 73, 74–75, 79

and Melville, 143, 165–66, 180, 190

and Poe, 130, 134

and Sedgwick, 225–26, 228, 245

Little Brown, 18

Little Crossbearers, The (Chesebro’), 274–75

Locke, Richard Adams, 113

London Athenaeum, 144, 156, 174

London Home News, 154

London Spectator, 144, 153–54, 156, 174

Long, William J., 254

Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth, 43

“Loss of Breath” (Poe), 97, 101–2, 104

Lounsbury, Thomas, 303

Love Token for Children (Sedgwick), 243–44, 248

Macy, John, 254

Mailloux, Steven, 10

“Man That Was Used Up, The” (Poe), 121

Manzoni, Alessandro, 50

Mardi (Melville), 138–39, 167, 170, 173, 184, 192, 193

publication, 156

reception of, 156–63, 165–66, 169, 181, 189

sales, 157, 166

writing of, 153–55

Married or Single? (Sedgwick), 249

reception of, 250–52

Martindale Pastoral (Chesebro’). See Peter Carradine

“Masque of the Red Death, The” (Poe), 124

Matthews, Brander, 300

Matthews, Cornelius, 61

McGill, Meredith, 109

Means and Ends (Sedgwick), 247, 248

reception of, 244

Melville, Elizabeth, 160, 190

Melville, Herman: audience distinction, dual, 139, 171–72

Battle-Pieces, 198–99

British publishers and reviews, 144, 145, 152, 153, 156, 157, 162–63, 174–75, 184

career, 137–40

Clarel, 198–99

conception of authorship, 138–39, 140, 153–55, 170–72, 174, 183, 190, 198

Confidence-Man, 141, 193–98

correspondence with Dana, 170–71

correspondence with E. Duyckinck, 162, 163, 164, 170, 183

correspondence with N. Hawthorne, 170, 173, 174

correspondence with Shaw, 163–64, 194

death, 200

“Hawthorne and His Mosses,” 139–40, 163–64, 171–73

horizon of expectations for, 158, 175, 190–91, 194–95

Israel Potter, 191–92

John Marr and Other Sailors, 199

literary ambition, 138, 153, 154, 170, 183

Mardi, 138–39, 153, 155–64, 165–66, 167, 169, 170, 173, 181, 184, 189, 192, 193

Moby-Dick, 138–39, 164, 170, 173–83, 193, 199–200

Omoo, 142, 153–54, 155, 157, 161–62, 165–66, 169, 181

The Piazza Tales, 192

Pierre, 174, 183–90, 192

poetry, 198–99

publication history, 144, 145, 197

realism, 165, 168, 175, 177, 178

reception of, 141–54, 156–70, 174–200

Redburn, 157, 164–66, 170, 192

relationship with E. Duyckinck, 153, 154, 183

romance fiction, 145, 148, 150, 154, 155, 158, 159, 161, 162, 165, 168, 169, 174, 176–77, 179, 185, 187, 189, 193

royalties, 191

sales, 139, 142, 153, 157, 166, 169, 181–82, 183, 189, 192, 197, 198, 199

sense of audience, xi, 138, 141, 152–53, 154–56, 162–64, 170–74, 183–84, 193–94, 198

short stories, 191–92

status, xi, 34, 193, 199–201

Timoleon, 199

topicality, 142–44, 166–69, 194–95

Typee, 138–39, 142–58, 161–62, 163, 166, 181, 182, 189

White-Jacket, 157, 164, 166–70

writer control and power, 140, 170

Mercer, Singleton, 124

Merchant’s Ledger, 193

“Mesmeric Revelation” (Poe), 132, 133

Methodist Quarterly Review, 168

“Metzengerstein” (Poe), 97, 99, 101

middle class: access to print, 157, 248

education, 24–31, 37–39, 46–47

informed reading, 49, 68–69, 82–83, 84, 152–53

Miller, Orton, and Mulligan, 275, 285, 286

Moby-Dick (Melville), 138–39, 193, 199–200

reception of, 174–83

sales, 181–82

writing of, 164, 170, 173

Model American Courier, 136

Monthly Review, 212

Montrose, Louis, 316

Moore, R. Laurence, 27

“Morella” (Poe), 97–98, 106, 137

Morning Courier and New York Enquirer, 146

Morse, James Herbert, 300–301

“Ms. Found in a Bottle” (Poe), 102, 103

“Murders in the Rue Morgue, The” (Poe), 122, 132

Murray, John, 145, 154, 155, 156

Museum of Foreign Literature, 202, 238, 239, 243

“Mystery of Maria Roget, The” (Poe), 122, 124

Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, The (Poe), 113–15

Nation, xi, 257, 294

“Never Bet the Devil Your Head” (Poe), 121

Newark Advertiser, 147, 197

Newark Daily Advertiser, 181

New Englander, 246

New England Magazine, 239

New England Tale, A (Sedgwick), 201, 204, 205, 233, 240, 249, 255

compared to Hope Leslie, 227

compared to Redwood, 215

reception of, 210–14

writing of, 210

New Haven Courier, 134

New Haven Palladium, 176, 181

New Historicism, ix, 4, 314, 316

New Republic, ix

New York Albion, 113, 157, 159, 167, 179–80, 186, 249, 251

New York Churchman, 181

New York Commercial Advertiser, 190

New York Corsair, 97

New York Courier and Enquirer, 280

New York Critic, 199

New York Daily Advertiser, 195

New York Daily and Weekly Mirror, 144

New York Day Book, 190, 194

New York Dispatch, 194, 195, 196, 197

New York Eclectic Magazine, 161

New York Evangelist, 145, 182, 265, 268

New York Evening Mirror, 147, 149, 187, 190

New York Evening Star, 106

New York Herald, 185

New York Independent, 176

New York International Review, 199

New York Journal, 195

New York Ledger, 42

New York Literary American, 165

New York Mail and Express, 200, 306

New-York Mirror, 38, 217

New York Morning Courier, 145, 189

New York Morning Herald, 158

New York Morning News, 142, 147, 149

New York National Magazine, 136, 190

New York Observer, 280, 288, 289

New York Review, 38, 211

New York Society Library, 28–29

New York Spirit of the Times, 176

New York Times, 200

New York Tribune, 310

and Chesebro’, 263–64, 265, 266, 268, 269, 270–71, 275–76, 277, 280, 285–86, 288–89, 293–94

and Melville, 153, 193, 195

and Poe, 126, 133

Norris, Frank, 300, 309, 312

North American Review, 3, 30, 36–38, 41, 44–46, 48, 50–55, 59, 69–70, 72–77, 300, 303, 305, 309

and Melville, 200

and Poe, 89, 107

and Sedgwick, 210, 211, 217–19, 225–27, 229–30, 232, 234, 236, 238–39, 241–42, 247, 250–51

Omoo (Melville), 142, 155, 157, 166, 169, 181

compared to Mardi, 158, 161–62

reception of, 153–54

Ontario Messenger, 262

Osgood, James, 290, 291, 292

“Oval Portrait, The” (Poe), 124

Overland Monthly, 305

Pancoast, Henry S., 303

Partner, Nancy, 316

Paulding, James Kirk, 43, 101–2, 103, 254

Pease, Donald, 316

Peck, George, 137

Pennysylvania Inquirer, 122

periodicals: British, 42, 87, 144, 156, 174

circulation, xi

class access, 26–27, 31

fiction, 30

gender and readership, 29

increase in reading, 19–21, 28

production development, 20

religious, 146

reviews, 31

selection, x. See also specific periodicals

Peter Carradine, or the Martindale Pastoral (Chesebro’): characterization, 287–88

domestic fiction, 288–90

publication history, 286

realism, 287, 289

reception of, 286–89

Peterson’s, 261, 268, 274, 276–77

Philadelphia Courier, 101

Philadelphia Pennsylvanian, 107

Philly and Kit (Chesebro’), 280–81

Piazza Tales, The (Melville), 192, 197

Pierre (Melville): conception and writing of, 174, 183–84

reception of, 184–90

Poe, Edgar Allan, 33, 34, 98

audience expectations, 91, 126

“The Balloon Hoax,” 132

“The Black Cat,” 123, 124, 125, 127–32

comic fiction, 96–99, 101–4

compared to Melville, 138, 140, 186, 190

death, 136

“The Descent into the Maelstrom,” 121, 123

detective fiction, 122

“The Devil in the Belfry,” 121

“Diddling,” 121

“The Duc de L’Omelette,” 97, 98

editor, 87

effect, 91–92, 93, 95–96

“Elenora,” 137

“The Gold Bug,” 88

gothic (Germanic) fiction, 96–99, 101, 103, 105, 106–11, 113, 114, 122, 123, 126, 131, 134, 135

hoaxes, 104–5, 110, 121, 132–33

horizon of expectations, 91, 97, 103, 114–15

informed reading, 89–93, 97

“Journal of Julius Rodman,” 123

“Ligeia,” 106, 110, 114, 115–19, 120, 136, 137

“Lionizing,” 101, 104

literary form, 111–12, 114, 125, 127

“The Masque of the Red Death,” 124

“Mesmeric Revelation,” 132, 133

“Morella,” 97–98, 106, 137

“Ms. Found in a Bottle,” 102-3

“The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” 122, 132

“The Mystery of Maria Rogét,” 122, 124

The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym, 113–15

“Never Bet the Devil Your Head,” 121

“The Oval Portrait,” 124

periodicals, 87–88

plot conventions, 90

posthumous reputation, 136–37

“The Psyche Zenobia,” 121

quarrel with L. G. Clark, 135

“The Raven,” 135

reader control and power, xi, 93, 95–96

reader response, 87

reading experience of tales, 99–101, 116–18, 123–31

reception of, 96–99, 101–4, 105–7, 110, 113-16, 118–19, 122, 126–27, 132–33, 134–37

relationship with E. Duyckinck, 123

relationship with Griswold, 136–37

as reviewer, 88–92, 93, 95–96

reviewer control, 93

revisions, 109

sense of audience, 87, 138–40

“The Signora Zenobia,” 109

“The Spectacles,” 121

status, 201

“The Tell-Tale Heart,” 123, 124, 125–27, 136

writer control and power, 92–96, 104–6, 140

Poor Rich Man and the Rich Poor Man (Sedgwick), 205, 233, 248, 250, 253

reception of, 240–43, 246

sales, 245

Porte, Joel, 300

Post-Lauria, Sheila, 141

Pritchard, John, 47, 66

“Psyche Zenobia, The” (Poe), 121

Putnam, 18, 198, 240

Putnam, George Palmer, 239

Putnam’s Monthly: and Chesebro’, 257, 273, 274, 284

and Melville, 159, 160–61, 185, 188, 190, 191, 192, 194, 195

Rabinow, Paul, 315

Rabinowitz, Peter, 16

“Raven, The” (Poe), 135

reader-response criticism: 1970s version, 140

and reception study, 4. See also response and audience studies

readers, common, 6

reading, informed, 47–84, 302, 308, 313, 314

and Chesebro’, 265–67, 269, 281, 284

and Melville, 138, 140, 141, 146, 151, 152, 160, 168, 177, 185, 188, 190

and Poe, 88, 89–93, 96–101, 103, 111, 114, 116–19, 122, 125–27, 129, 131, 137

and Sedgwick, 204, 209, 211, 212, 214, 220, 225, 227–29, 231, 233–34, 236. See also response, informed reading and interpretation, theories of, 8–15

reading formations, 12–13, 299

reading materials, production, 18–19

realism, 50, 51, 53, 54, 76, 165, 168, 175, 177, 178, 219, 262, 287, 288, 289, 293–94, 296, 298, 301, 312. See also verisimilitude

reception, theory of, 6–7, 8, 314

vis-á-vis production, 14–17. See also hermeneutics, historical

reception events, 5, 6, 8, 17, 18, 31, 101, 137, 190

reception study: communal practices, 4

history, ix–x, 4–7

implications, xii, 299, 320

issues, 8–9, 314–15

objectives, 7. See also hermeneutics, historical

reception theory, 6-7, 8, 314. See also hermeneutics, historical: theory of

reception vis-à-vis production, 14-17

Redburn (Melville), 157, 170, 192

reception of, 164–66

sales, 166

Redfield and Company, 257, 280, 285

Redwood (Sedgwick), 205, 208, 220, 228, 233, 234, 238, 240, 246, 249, 255

compared to A New England Tale, 215

compared to Clarence, 229

reception of, 215–19, 254

Renker, Elizabeth, 140

response, informed, 130, 136, 183

response and audience studies, history of, 4–7

return to history, 4, 5

reviewers and critics, guidance, 31–32, 38–40

Reynolds, David, 125

Richmond Compiler, 98, 101, 104, 135

Richmond Enquirer, 144

Richmond Semi-Weekly Examiner, 185

Richmond Watchman and Observer, 161

Richmond Whig, 102

Rogers, Mary, 122

Russell, W. H., 19

Russell, William Clark, 199

Russell’s Magazine, 252

Saintine, Y. B., 53

Sand, George (Amantine Aurore Lucile Dupin), 44–46, 221

Saroni’s Musical Times, 39, 159, 167

Sartain’s, 245, 250, 257, 261–64, 265–66, 268

Saturday Courier, 96, 107

Saturday Evening Post, 106, 107

Saturday Museum, 122

Schwarz, Daniel, 83

Schweickart, Patrocinio, 7

Scott, Walter, 36, 49, 79, 89, 202, 205, 216, 217, 219, 221, 236, 306, 307–8

Scribner’s, 18

Sedgwick, Catharine, 8

anonymous publication, 205, 210

audience expectations, 205

becoming a writer, 210

Boy of Mt. Rhigi, 245–46

characterization, 212, 218, 224–27, 230–31, 237–39, 241

Clarence, 204, 207, 228, 229–32, 233, 238, 241, 243, 246, 249

compared to Scott, 216, 219

correspondence, 208, 213–14, 216, 218, 222, 228, 229, 231, 235, 245, 249

domestic fiction, 215–16, 230, 247, 251–52

historical fiction, 219, 221–23, 235–37

Home, 232–34

Hope Leslie, 201, 204, 205, 207, 208, 219-28, 229, 233, 238, 240, 243, 245, 247–49, 255

horizon of expectations, 211, 213, 234, 246

Indians, 223–27

juvenile fiction, 242-49, 250, 254-55

The Linwoods, 235–40, 242, 243

literary ambition, 207–8

Live and Let Live, 240–43

Love Token for Children, 243–44

Married or Single? 249–52

Means and Ends, 244–45

national American novelist, 202, 211, 215–17, 221–22, 254

A New England Tale, 201, 204, 205, 210–14, 215, 227, 233, 240, 249, 255

plotting, 218–19, 231–32, 238

The Poor Rich Man and the Rich Poor Man, 205, 233, 240–43, 245–46, 248, 250, 253

Puritans,

Sedgwick, Catharine 222–23

reception of, 202, 210–14, 215–19, 221–32, 233–39, 240–49, 250–55

recovery, 201–2

Redwood, 205, 208, 215–19, 220, 227–29, 233, 234, 238, 240, 246, 249, 254, 255

relationship with publishers, 203, 248, 250

relationship with readers, 204–5, 209–10, 229, 249

religious issues, 211–15

sales, 210, 219, 228, 234, 239, 245, 248

sense of audience, 206, 229, 249

status, xii, 34, 201–3

Stories for Young Persons, 248, 250

style, 239–40, 251–52

Shakespeare, William, 49, 170, 175, 238–39

Sharpe, Kevin, 7

Shaw, Lemuel, 163-64, 194

Sheldon and Company, 286

Shelton, F.W., 62

“Signora Zenobia, The” (Poe), 109

Simms, William Gilmore, 257, 285, 310

Smith, Seba, 90

Smith, Sidney, 210

Snodgrass, Joseph, 107

Soltow, Lee, 23

Southern Literary Messenger, 36, 37, 39, 40–41, 49, 50–51, 53–54, 56, 60, 62–63, 64–65, 68, 72, 74–75, 77–78, 80–82, 304

and Chesebro’, 263, 266-68, 270

and Melville, 143, 148, 160, 165, 187–90

and Poe, 87, 89, 96, 98, 101, 104, 106, 114, 116, 136

and Sedgwick, 202–3, 206, 240

Southern Quarterly Review, 56, 58, 69, 71, 72, 78

and Chesebro’, 261, 267, 271, 273

and Melville, 159, 167, 180, 190

and Poe, 135

and Sedgwick, 215

Sparrow’s Fall (Chesebro’), 290, 291

“Spectacles, The” (Poe), 121

Spiller, Robert, 295

Springfield Republican, 148, 165, 168, 176, 193, 194, 197, 200, 305

Stephens, Ann, 82–83

Sterling, John, 60

Stevens, Edward, 23

Stevenson, Robert Louis, 306

Stewart, Charles, 144

St. Louis Globe Democrat, 199

Stories for Young Persons (Sedgwick), 248, 250

Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 28, 33, 202, 204, 252, 258, 292, 306

study of reading, 4–7. See also hermeneutics, historical

reader-response criticism

reception study

Sullivan, William, 315

Susan, the Fisherman’s Daughter

(Chesebro’): characterization, 277–79

publication history, 276

reception of, 276–80

style, 277

success, 280

Swift, Jonathan, 113, 155, 165

Symmes, John, 103

Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque (Poe), 106–11, 113, 120, 121

“Tell-Tale Heart, The” (Poe), 123, 124, 127, 136

textual essentialism, 4, 9–10, 311

textuality, 8–12, 316

Thackeray, William Makepeace, 58, 68, 72, 73, 75, 76, 79

thematic interpretation: allegorical, 62–64

general, 59–64

learned fiction, 64–65

middle-class values, 65, 84

relationship to plot, 61–64

symbolic/emblematic, 63–64

Thomas, Fredrick, 121

Thompson, G.R., 100

Ticknor and Fields, 291

To-Day, 181, 182

Todorov, Tzvetan, 118

Troy Budget, 177, 187, 196

Troy Daily Times, 263, 265

Troy Whig, 268

Turgenev, Ivan, 309

Twain, Mark, 303–4, 308, 310, 312

Typee (Melville), 138–39, 154-55, 161–62, 163, 182, 189

reception of, 142–51, 153, 156, 158, 166, 181

sales, 157

writing of, 151–52

United States Catholic Magazine, 147

United States Literary Gazette, 215, 240

United States Magazine and Democratic Review, 167, 168, 244, 246, 249, 282–83, 284

verisimilitude, 50, 54, 72, 73, 74, 76, 78, 79

and Chesebro’, 262, 265–66, 271, 277–78, 280, 283, 287, 293–94, 296, 298

and Melville, 155, 165, 168

and Poe, 89–90, 102, 105, 113

and Sedgwick, 212, 214, 216, 218–19, 225–27, 230, 231. See also realism

Victoria, or the World Overcome (Chesebro’), 296

characterization, 281–83

historical fiction, 281

plot, 281–83

publication history, 281

reception of, 281–85

“Von Jung” (Poe), 97

“Von Kempelen and His Discovery” (Poe), 132

Wallace, James D., 31, 304

Walpole, Horace, 98, 100

Warner, Susan, 19, 28, 202, 203, 252, 256, 290, 296

Washington National Era: and Chesebro’, 257, 261–62, 263–65, 269, 270, 272, 273, 277-81, 284–85

and Melville, 186–87

Washington National Intelligencer, 144, 154, 175

Washington Union, 176

Weekly Chronotype, 160

Weinauer, Ellen, 171

Weir, Margaret, 22

Wendell, Barrett, 254, 295

Wentz, Sarah, 61

Western Monthly Review, 225, 227, 228

Whalen, Terence, 94

White, Hayden, 315, 316, 320

White, Thomas, 102, 105

White-Jacket (Melville), 157, 164–66, 170, 189

reception of, 167–69

Whitman, Sarah Helen, 133, 137

Widdleton, William, 285

Wiley, 18

Wiley and Putnam, 123, 142, 157

Williams, Raymond, 317

“William Wilson” (Poe), 106, 110, 114, 115, 116, 119, 123

Windscuttle, Keith, 315

working class, access to print, 26–27, 42

Youth’s Keepsake, 243

Zboray, Ronald, 28

Zwicker, Steven N., 7

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Notes

Additional Information

ISBN
9780801899331
Related ISBN
9780801898747
MARC Record
OCLC
794700392
Pages
393-403
Launched on MUSE
2011-07-21
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC-ND
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