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Index Page numbers in italics refer to illustrations. Abakuá Secret Society, 115–16, 123, 128 Academics, politicization of, 311–15 ACBANTU. See Cultural Association for the Preservation of Bantu Heritage ACEJUNEP. See Cultural Association for Black Peruvian Youth Acosta, Alberto, 209–10, 210, 211, 214n1 Advancement of the Afro-Colombian, Palenquero, and Raizal Population, 149 Affirmative action, 12, 268; Afro-Colombian, 160, 170; for Afro-Ecuadorians, 178; in Brazil, 245, 257, 314, 319; in higher education, 245; quotabased , xii African diaspora, 63–64, 278, 315–16; activism, 213; dances, 49; identity, 45; marinera origins theory and, 48, 48; in Mexico, 93–94, 109, 111; Peru and, 44; Primer Congreso de la Cultura Negra de las Américas and, 203–4; urban land in politics of, 227–31 African Matrix Civilizational Heritage, 26 African nation, 23 Afro-America XXI, 247, 255 Afro-Andean Documentary Fund, 185 Afro-Brazilian movements, 226–27, 312–13, 315; women as foot soldiers in, 233–38 Afro-Brazilians, 8; cultural expressions, 36, 47; education, 245; intellectuals of 1940s and 1950s, 318; land rights and, 11; neighborhood movements at heart of political space, 226–27; NGOs, 257, 260; politics“below the asphalt,” 223–27; population, 22; religion and, 23; social and political mobilization, 11–12, 30; unemployment , 244–45; urban neighborhood’s political organization, 226. See also Brazilian sociology; specific people and religions Afro-Brazilian women, 250; as community leaders in Salvador, 231–33; domestic work, 232; as foot soldiers in movements, 233–38; health care struggles, 238–39; neighborhood struggles for land rights, 12, 219–39; political organization of, 230; political rights claims, 237; quilombo communities and, 249; UN’s Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, 255–56. See also Gamboa de Baixo Afro-Caribbean Festival, 102, 106; name change, 105; poster designs, 105, 106, 107, 107; Santería and, 104–5, 107–8 Afro-Caribbean identity, in Veracruz, 108 Afrocolombiano, 148 Afro-Colombians, 10, 149, 150, 166, 205; affirmative action, 160, 170; anthropology, 142; autonomy, 173; in Buenos Aires, Cauca, 163–64; citizenship , 156, 161–64; on Colombian Congress, 258; Congress members, 148; denial, 140; displacement , 146; education, 138, 151n4, 167–68, 169–70, 246; electoral politics, 148–49; ethnic territories, 156; ethno-education, 144–45, 167–68; intersection of politics and musical expression, 144–45; invisibility of, 139; legislation aimed at, 135; music, 139, 144–45; populations, 137, 161, 162, 246; recognition of, 159; regions and, 136–37; self-identified, 137, 246; socioeconomic gaps, 138, 245–46; structural racism, 162; students, 147 Afro-Colombian social mobilizations, 11, 135, 150–51, 160; pre-1990s, 138–40; 1990s reform, movements, and multiculturalism, 140–45; raizales and, 137–38; support, 146–47 Afrocubanismo, 131 Afro-Cubans: Landaluze’s depictions of, 116–31; population, 114, 122 350  Index Afro-descendant, 2, 6, 12, 13, 14. See also Afro-Latin Americans Afrodescendiente, 148 Afro-Dominicans, 324, 332, 335–36; defense of human rights for, 337–38, 340–41 Afro-Ecuadorian activists, 177, 193, 213; CCA and, 183; Comboni missionaries and, 178, 185–90, 203; Ecuadorian politics and, 180–85; material resources, 188; women, 189–90 Afro-Ecuadorian Confederation of North Esmeraldas (CANE), 184 Afro-Ecuadorian Consciousness Movement (MAEC), 187, 192 Afro-Ecuadorian Cultural Center (CCA), 183, 185, 204–5; educational focuses, 186; houses, 187–88 Afro-Ecuadorian Pastoral Department (DPA), 185, 187 Afro-Ecuadorians, 11, 66n20, 192, 194n1; affirmative action policies for, 178; Catholic Church and, 178; collective rights, 205–6; Colombia’s influence on, 205; communities, 199, 199; community organizing and political struggles, 202–6; in Constitution, 201; corporatism and 2008 constitution , 206–12, 213; famous soccer players, 193; land rights and, 184–85; in mainstream media, 186–87; middle-class, 193; movement of, 199; organizing prior to 1970s, 214n3; political participation in government, 190–92; population, 176, 198–99; poverty, inequality, and exclusion, 178–80; socioeconomic situation of, 177–78 Afro-Ecuadorian Studies Center (CEA), 182–83, 187 Afroid wordage, arbitrary, 50 Afro-Latin Americans, ix–x, 1, 9–10, 14; citizenship transformation, 159, 172–74; collective rights, 267; community self-governance, 157–58; historic categorization of, 161; integrated social movements and, 250–51; legislators and leadership , 257–59; populations, 162; recognition, 157; significance of populations, 243–44; slavery and citizenship, 165. See also specific countries and peoples Afro–Latin American social movements, 8–12; burgeoning, 11; funding for, 251–52, 254; history of, 247; international policies and, 259; with international reach, 254; national advances, 256–57; role played by, 9; stages of, 248–56; strategies...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780813042695
Related ISBN
9780813037561
MARC Record
OCLC
793166733
Pages
382
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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