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256 13 The Revolution January 1–March 19, 1893 January 1, 1893, Honolulu, H.I. Dearest Carl, So you see at last this year has come to its opening. I suppose in many, many lives it has been the year of promise for a long time. How many have we heard say, “I will do this and so when ’93 comes.” Even for me, it must contain trial, disappointment and weariness, but I must confess my hopes and anticipations are high. It seems to me no year will ever come that will contain more variety of happiness. I expect the happiness of becoming your wife, but there are many other precious joys to look forward too. I hope the rest of my time here will be full and rich. Mrs. Soares, the Portuguese pastor’s wife1 telephoned me yesterday to know if I would play in their church service today. Their organist was disabled. I was the only English one there and of course I understood nothing of the service. Attracted by my blue dress, little Ray, the oldest child came and nestled beside me and patted and smoothed my hand. I was glad of a nap this afternoon for I was tired from yesterday afternoon and everybody celebrated last night with crackers, bells and cannon. Mr. Emerson got back from Molokai yesterday morning and sent me a half dozen sweet snails and fern leis. I distributed them among the teachers and we all decorated our rooms. I have long been intending to have him to dinner and so asked him last evening. I must confess I was a little tried because my dinner didn’t go off very well. The girls forgot the corn and salad till we were almost through and then came bringing them in and the biscuits were yellow with saleratus. All the teachers did their best at entertaining end. Miss Burgess sang for us. He had to go early and Miss Van Anglen arrived wet, tired and hungry and I had to attend to her. Tuesday morning—Mrs. Cooke was telling me last night some old love tales of the islands and rather heart-rending scenes. Mrs. Atherton was engaged to Judge Judd, but he went away to Yale and became so absorbed in his work there, she fancied he did not care much for her. She broke the engagement. When Frank Judd got the news, he was made sick by it and her own brother and sister who were in New Haven at the time sided with him. Mother Cooke felt it all so deeply that she would not speak to her daughter for 3 months and many of their friends left town to avoid attending the wedding . Everything is all smooth between the two families now. There were several other similar cases. I think I told you that the same misfortune happened to Mr. Emerson. He was engaged to Mrs. Baldwin, whose husband is one of the wealthiest men on the islands, and while he was off at school, she broke it off. The moral of all which is for you and me dearest, is that we must not let the cares of this world keep us from knowing the true state of our feelings toward each other and to keep each other informed as regards to that state. Dear heart, our dangers are almost over and surely we will be saved from mistakes for the rest of the time. Miss Kenwill and I spent most of the day yesterday with Mrs. Needham and her daughter Mrs. Peck. They were very kind but it’s hard for me to spend a day like that as a prim visitor. It rained, so we sat and talked and talked and at the proper time, ate rich food. When Mr. Peck came from the Y.M.C.A. of which he is secretary, he showed me his immense collection of shells of which he really knows nothing. Mr. Needham was much more entertaining to me with his tales of sea life for he used to be steward on a whaler. We got him to talk whales to us which he did at a great rate telling us how good doughnuts were fried in whale oil and the great excitement of the whales themselves. I listened with all my ears as I am not likely to meet whalers again. January 3, 1893, Kawaiahao Seminary Dearest Carl, How it rained all day yesterday. In fact it began on...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780824837228
Related ISBN
9780824836276
MARC Record
OCLC
821735443
Launched on MUSE
2012-09-21
Language
English
Open Access
No
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