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61 23 The Beautiful Daughter A woman gave birth to a daughter who was very beautiful. She was so beautiful that she didn’t want to give her away in marriage. The day that her mother was to go to the market, she prepared some porridge for her daughter, gave her some flour as well, and advised her not to go to the pond when her friends came by. When the woman had gone, around noon, the daughter’s friends came and asked her to accompany them to the pond. She began to refuse but her friends convinced her to go. They were bathing in the pond when a crocodile came out of the water. He stole their clothes and went back into the water. The girls started to sing asking him to return their clothes to them. One sang: Handsome crocodile! Handsome crocodile! Give me back my skin! The crocodile replied: Pretty girl! Pretty girl ! Come and get it! 62 Alain-Joseph Sissao (Translated from the French by Nina Tanti) The girl went to get her under garments. All the others did the same, and took back their clothing. Only the woman’s beautiful daughter was left. She sang as well: Handsome crocodile! Handsome crocodile! Give me back my skin! And the crocodile told her: Pretty girl! Pretty girl! Come and get it! When she stepped into the pond, the crocodile pulled her down to the bottom of the water. The woman came back from the market and did not find her daughter. She began to cry, while singing: I gave birth to my daughter. Her friends took her to the pond! A crocodile caught her! While she was singing, there was a turtledove nearby who was listening to her. The turtledove asked her: ‘‘If I bring you back your daughter, what will you give me?’’ ‘‘I will give you a plate of millet!’’ The turtledove went and perched on a tree next to the pond. She began to sing: Kuglguru, kuglguru, tumkugrwè1 ! Kullu, Kullu gave birth! 1. Cooking of the turtledove 63 Folktales from the Moose of Burkina Faso Kullu gave birth to a woman who gave birth to a pretty daughter ! Kullu Ragoanna doesn’t want her to marry, Kullu Ragoanna ! Better to keep her and look at her than give her away in marriage ! Kullu Ragoanna ! The crocodile heard the song, which pleased him. He said to the monitor lizard: ‘‘Lizard, come watch over my daughter so that I can go listen to the song!’’ The lizard accepted and the crocodile went out. The turtledove sang again. The lizard called the tortoise and asked her to come watch over the girl so that he could go listen to the song. The lizard went out and the turtledove sang again. The tortoise called the fish and asked him to come watch over the beautiful girl so that she could go listen to the song. The fish accepted. Soon, the dove sang again. The fish went to see the frog and asked her to come watch over the beautiful girl so that he could go out and listen to the song. When the frog arrived she, too, heard the turtledove’s song, which pleased her. She called the bullfrog and entrusted him with the girl’s care. She also wanted to go out and hear the music. When the frog had gone, the bullfrog heard the turtledove singing. He was enchanted by the music and asked the toad to come watch over the girl so that he could go listen to the song. After the bullfrog left, the toad heard the song which pleased him. He asked the house to watch over the girl so that he could go listen to the song. 64 Alain-Joseph Sissao (Translated from the French by Nina Tanti) When the turtledove discovered that they were all outside and that the girl was alone, she went and got her, and took her back to her mother. The crocodile returned and didn’t find the girl. He asked the monitor lizard: ‘‘Lizard, who did you leave the girl with?’’ ‘‘I left her with the tortoise so that she would watch her and I could go listen to the song,’’ said the lizard. ‘‘Tortoise, who did you leave the girl with?’’ ‘‘I left her with the fish so that he would watch her and I could go listen to the song.’’ ‘‘Fish, who did you leave the girl with?’’ ‘‘I left her with the...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9789956578009
Related ISBN
9789956616558
MARC Record
OCLC
680618032
Pages
136
Launched on MUSE
2013-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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