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Index Abraham, Spencer, 52–53, 76 ad-tracking data, 9, 39–41 advertising exposure, impact on voter choice by emotional appeal, 93–99 measurement of, 42–47 by partisanship, 114–119 by political knowledge, 107–114 in presidential elections (2000 and 2004), 54–59 in presidential primaries (2000), 60–64 in Senate elections (2000 and 2004), 64–69 trade-offs and imbalances, 72 “ad watches,” 136–137 affective intelligence theory, 30 affect transfer model, 29–30, 88, 98 American National Election Studies (ANES) candidate evaluations, 47–48 limitations of, 49 persuasiveness of campaign advertising, 14, 39, 55, 65, 88 political information measurement, 107–108 anger-focused ads, 84–87, 94–96, 98–99 Annenberg panel survey, 34 Ansolabehere, Stephen, 21–22, 34–35 Arceneaux, Kevin, 3, 33–34, 50 Associated Press, 126, 127 backlash, against negative ads model, 87–88 risk of, 27–30 in Senate vs. presidential elections, 94– 96, 99–100 banner ads, 141–142 Berelson, Bernard, 34 blogs, 120 Bowles, Erskine, 70 Brader, Ted, 29, 30, 81 Bradley, Bill, 60–64 Brannon, Laura A., 34 Brigham Young University study. See BYU–UW survey Brooks, Deborah Jordan, 29 Brown, Scott, 76 Burr, Richard, 70 Bush, George W. 2000 election, 47, 48, 51, 54–59, 73–75, 88–93 2000 primaries, 60–64 2004 election, 54–59, 73–75, 82, 85–86, 88–99, 103–105, 107–119 2004 primaries, 131 182 Î Index byproduct effects, 3, 22 Byrd, Robert, 52 BYU–UW survey candidate evaluation, 48 persuasiveness of campaign advertising, 14, 39–40, 55, 65, 88 political knowledge, 53, 108 campaign advertising democratic accountability and, 149–152 introduction, 1–6, 145–148 online ads, 6–7, 120, 137–142, 150–151 persuasiveness of (see persuasiveness of campaign advertising) positive-negative categorization of, 79–80 role of, 16–18 television (see television advertising) campaign environment. See context, and persuasiveness of campaign advertising campaign-finance law, 9–10 campaign issues, 121, 150 campaign reform initiatives, 17–18 candidate evaluations, advertising’s impact on intended effects hypothesis, 27 measurement of, 47–48, 55 partisanship and, 114–119 political knowledge and, 107–114 presidential elections, 57, 98 Cantwell, Maria, 76 Carr, David, 8 Castor, Betty, 70, 76, 83, 95 CBS News, 51 CCES (Cooperative Congressional Election Study), 133 Chang, Chingching, 34 Chattanooga Times and Free Press, 125 Clinton, Hillary, 2, 17 Clinton, Joshua, 50 CNN, 105 Coburn, Tom, 84 cognitive accounts, 28 Coleman, Norm, 76 Colorado Senate race (2004), 70 competitiveness of campaign, 23, 25–26, 53, 66–69 congressional elections 2000, 92 2004, 44–47, 69–71, 82–87, 88–90, 92, 93–99, 107–119 2006, viii, 124, 133–137 2010, viii ad effectiveness, 52–53, 64–69 ad tone impact, 88–90, 92 county-level analysis, 73, 76–77 data sources, 39–41 media coverage of ads, 128–129 number of ads per media market, 10–11 voters’ awareness of candidates, 23–24 consumer purchasing behavior, 12–13 context, and persuasiveness of campaign advertising, 51–78 county-level effects, 71–77 early vs. late timing, 69–71 factors in, 23–26 future research needs, 148–149 introduction, 51–54 in presidential elections, 54–59 in presidential primary elections, 60–64 contrast ads, persuasiveness of media coverage and, 130 methodological issues, 28–29, 80 partisanship and, 35 presidential elections, 64, 84, 90, 92 Senate races, 92, 99 Cooperative Congressional Election Study (CCES), 133 Coors, Pete, 70 Corker, Bob, 124 corporations, campaign advertising spending, 7 county-level analysis, 71–77 data and research design, 37–50 ad persuasion analysis, 14–16 advertising exposure estimation, 42–47 dependent variables and model specification , 47–49 future needs, 148–149 introduction, 37–39 surveys and ad-tracking data, 39–41 Dean, Howard, 10, 131 democratic accountability, 149–152 Index D 183 Democratic Party 2004 Senate ads, 44 2008 election ads, 12 campaign advertising sponsorship, 1–2 negativity of ads, 3–4 See also congressional elections; presidential election campaigns Democrats, 34, 106, 114–119, 121 dependent variables, 47–49 direct mail, 36 discrete emotions model, 29–30, 88, 98 dosage-resistance model, of political awareness, 31–32 Dukakis, Michael, 2 DVRs (digital video recorders), 8 Edwards, John, 79 effectiveness of campaign advertising. See persuasiveness of campaign advertising e-mails, 120 emotional appeals, ad effectiveness impact, 79–101 future research needs, 148 introduction, 79–80 methodology of study, 81 models, 87–88 results of study, 93–101 timing and frequency, 81–87 emotions, of voters, 28, 29–30, 88 enthusiasm-focused ads, 84–87, 96–98 environment...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781439903346
Related ISBN
9781439903339
MARC Record
OCLC
719377497
Pages
186
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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