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Generic Keys and species Accounts Keys, Distribution, Illustrations, and Short Descriptions Keys to the grass genera follow (for the most part) Gould (1975b), Gould and Shaw (1983), and Shaw (2008). All keys are artificial, and unrelated taxa are often grouped together. Figure 5.1 presents a diagrammatic guide to major key groups. The keys are solely for identification purposes and are not intended to express phylogenetic relationships. However, in some cases closely related genera are grouped together (i.e., Andropogoneae in Group 3, and the Paniceae in Group 4). Subfamilial, tribal, and generic relationships are best viewed in the checklist. Dichotomous keys are numbered and indented. Under “Key to the Groups,” genera with similar morphological characteristics are placed in numbered keys (Groups 1–10). Groups 1–10 keys then lead to specific genera. Genera may key out in more than one numbered key and/or more than once in a single numbered key. The page number on which the generic description and the species key (if the genus has more than one species) is provided. A brief generic description giving distinguishing morphological characteristics is provided . Also included are basic chromosome number (x) and photosynthetic pathway (C3 , C4 ). Genera are alphabetized and numbered consecutively throughout the book. Subfamily and tribe are included for each genus. Species and infraspecies keys follow those presented for each genus in volumes 24 and 25 in the Flora of North America series (Barkworth 2003, 2007) and in Gould (1975a). Author names are cited immediately after the species. Species are alphabetical and numbered consecutively within a genus. Included are the scientific name (genus, species, author citation) and vernacular names (sometimes referred to as the common name, which is not common at all). A brief description pointing out specific features of the plant or information concerning the species follows the names. A list of synonyms can be found in Jones, Wipff, and Montgomery (1997). Included here are 668 grass species, including their infraspecies taxa (if warranted); 49 ornamental species have been omitted due to lack of distributional data, descriptive information , and distinguishing vegetative or floristic characteristics. The majority of the omitted ornamentals are “bamboos” that rarely flower, making them more difficult to accurately identify . Hopefully, a more inclusive section on ornamentals can be added in later editions or by other authors, as the number of forms, varieties , and species being introduced and grown as ornamentals continues to increase. Species county distributional maps are based on 17,795 county records of occurrence provided by the Intermountain Herbarium, Utah State University and Turner et al. (2003). Chapter 5 : GENERIC KEYS AND SPECIES ACCOUNTS Figure 5.1. Diagrammatic guide to major key groups of grasses in Texas. If the grass matches the characteristics, go to that group; if the grass does not fit, follow the arrow. Species Accounts 77 Key to the Groups 1. Culms perennial, usually woody; often developing complex branching systems; upper leaves usually pseudopetiolate (Bambuseae)........................................................................ Group 1 1. Culms annual, rarely woody; sometimes branching above but not developing complex branching systems; leaves not pseudopetiolate. 2. Spikelets or florets contained within burlike structure, disarticulation below that structure. ............................................................................................................................. Group 2 2. Spikelets or florets not contained within burlike structure. 3. Spikelets unisexual, staminate, and pistillate spikelets usually conspicuously different ... ......................................................................................................................... Group 3 3. Spikelets perfect, or if unisexual, then staminate and pistillate spikelets not readily distinguishable. 4. Spikelets with a single fertile floret, with or without reduced florets. 5. Spikelets in pairs of 1 sessile and 1 pediceled (sometimes 2 pediceled spikelets at branch tips); sessile spikelets fertile; pedicellate spikelets staminate, rudimentary, or absent with pedicel still obvious; lower glume large, firm, and tightly clasping, or enclosing the entire spikelet (Andropogoneae) .................................... Group 4 5. Spikelets not as above. 6. Inflorescences with 2 morphologically distinct spikelet forms............... Group 6 6. Inflorescences with all spikelets morphologically similar. 7. Reduced floret or florets present below fertile floret. 8. Reduced floret 1; lemma of reduced floret similar to upper glume in shape, size, and texture; disarticulation below the glumes (Paniceae) ..... .................................................................................................. Group 5 8. Reduced floret 1 or 2; lemma of reduced floret(s) not similar to upper glumes in shape, size, or texture; disarticulation above the glumes.......... .................................................................................................. Group 6 7. Reduced floret absent or above the fertile florets. 9. Inflorescence paniculate, never spicate................................... Group 7 9. Inflorescence a spike, spicate, or with 2 to several spicate primary branches. 10. Inflorescence of 1 to several unilateral spicate primary branches... ......................................................................................... Group 8 10. Inflorescence a terminal, bilateral spike or spicate raceme Group 9 4. Spikelets with 2...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781603446747
Related ISBN
9781603441865
MARC Record
OCLC
794003392
Pages
832
Launched on MUSE
2012-06-26
Language
English
Open Access
No
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