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Bulletin of the National Research Council December 1929 Number 74 Report of the Conference on Midwestern Archaeology, Held in St. Louis, Missouri May 18,1929 Including a Report of an Open Meeting of the Committee, Held May 17, 1929 Issued under the Auspices of the Committee on State Archaeological Surveys of the Division of Anthropology and Psychology of the National Research Council [Frontispiece of original report] The Serpent Mound, Adams County, Ohio. The largest known "effigy mound," I330 feet in length. It probably had a religious significance to its builders. The location is now a state park belonging ro the Ohio Archaeological and Hisrorical Society. PREFACE The Committee on State Archmological Surveys of the National Research Council has been active for several years in promoting the conservation and scientific study of the prehistoric Indian sites scattered through the states bordering on the Mississippi River and its tributaries. The appalling destruction of these sites by individuals ignorant or careless of their value, and by commercial exploiters, has extinguished much valuable historical evidence. Inefficient excavation by untrained" archmologists " has contributed its quota of ruin. On the other hand, the benefits derived through conserving of the mounds and making them available to the public as parks, and through fostering of their scientific study, have been signally demonstrated by several of the states. As a detail in its efforts to promote the conservation, study, and public use of the sites, the Committee decided to hold a Conference on Midwestern Archmology, at which archmologists familiar with the region, representatives of the states, and other public spirited citizens might discuss the problems; and through which the facts might effectively be laid before the public. St. Louis, the "Mound City," was selected as the place for the Conference, both because of the wealth of archmological material in the State of Missouri and because of the generous cooperation of the Governor and citizens of that state. The Conference was held on Saturday, May 18, 1929, preceded on Friday, .May 17, by an open meeting of the Committee for the presentation of technical reports in the morning; an expedition to the Cahokia mounds (see Figures 1 and 2) under the direction of Professor Moorehead in the afternoon; and an illustrated public lecture by Director H. C. Shetrone of the Ohio State Museum in the evening. By means of many lantern slides, Mr. Shetrone introduced the audience to the great variety of earthworks scattered through the" General Mound Area" including the "effigy mounds" of Wisconsin, representing birds and animals; the Great Serpent Mound (see frontispiece), the great conical mounds, and the geometrical mound of Ohio; and the truncated pyramid flood-refuges of the lower Mississippi valley. The lecturer portrayed vividly the excavation work of the archmologist, by which he reveals the physical and social characteristics and the arts and industries of the mound-builders. Copious illustrations of the artistic pottery, and the implements and ornaments of stone, shell, bone, copper, silver and pearl, of these peoples, were presented. The Conference concluded Saturday evening with a dinner, from which addresses were radioed through Station KMOX. On Friday and Saturday , radio talks relevant to the conference purposes were given over Stations KMOX and KWK. The principal addresses at the Conference and the preliminary sessions, with the additional radio speeches, are included in this bulletin, together with extracts from the discussions. These statements, by men thoroughly familiar with the matters whereof they speak, present the situation and the needed remedies more effectively than would be possible in a single expository account. The National Research Council expresses its grateful appreciation to the Committee on State Archreological Surveys, to the members of the Conference, to Governor Caulfield of Missouri, and to many citizens of the state who gave their time and energy towards making a success of the Conference. 88 KNIGHT DUNLAP, Ohairman, Division of Anthropology and Psychology, National Research Council. SETTING THE AGENDA FOR AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY CONTENTS FRoNTIsPIECE-The Serpent Mound PAGE PREFACE..................... ............................................. 3 PART I. PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS BEFORE THE CONFERENCE Address of welcome. Governor Henry S. Caulfield ................... 7 Reply. Knight Dunlap .............................................. 10 The conservation of public sites. Fay-Cooper Cole .................... 11 Discussion of Mr. Cole's paper. Rufus Dawes ........................ 16 The importance of systematic and accurate methods in archreological investigation. F. W. Hodge ...................................... 19 Discussion of Mr. Hodge's paper. M. W. Stirling.................... 24 General discussion ................................................... 28 The value to the state of archreological surveys. A. C. Parker .......... 31 Discussion of Mr. Parker's paper. G. R. Throop....................... 42 Archreology as a...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780817313531
Related ISBN
9780817310844
MARC Record
OCLC
772460338
Pages
386
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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