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Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma'u in English Language of original: Source oftext: Introduction: Arabic List ofAsma'u Students n.d. Waziri Junaidu 375 Work 64 This is a list ofAsma'u's students, which is not exhaustive, since it covers only the villages lying south and south-west of Sokoto. Related texts: None Significant features: The spellings reflect both pre-colonial pronunciations, and miswritings by copyists who did not understand what they were writing. For example, Bodinga (I. 8) is written "Bodiyga" which was perhaps the received pronunciation at the time. Also, as is always the case, transliterations frequently lead to complications. To take the example again ofBodinga: Ogunbiyi (1982) transliterates this as Butighay, Shuni as Sun, Chacho as Shasu,Jarecfi as Jarita, Kilgori as Kilghur, and so on. This is not to criticise Ogunbiyi, but rather to highlight the difficulties involved in this work. The place names were transcribed for this version by AlRali Sidi Sayucfi who knows the area, knows what the traditional spelling conventions are and instantly recognised some, but not all, ofthe place names. The ulama of Malam Boyi's Islamic College recognised enough of the names for them to feel confident that all were in the three districts of DanCadi, Shuni and Bodinga, that is to say to the south-west of Sokoto. The places in some cases are difficult to locate. Take the case of Muhammad Dikko (line 3): this is a perfectly ordinary man's name: his womenfolk were Asma'u's students. But it is nearly impossible to locate this man's house after a lapse of 150 years. Other examples in this category are tlle homes of Muhammad Faruji, Abubakar Magau, and Bello Bomau. There are places which have the Hausa suffix "awa" meaning "people of' - Bagarawa, Bagalawa, Zangalawa, Madorawa and Gingawa. These are also difficult to trace, to say nothing of the possibilities that some places have disappeared altogether. Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u in English List ofAsma'u Students n.d. 375 Work 64 Arabic Waziri Junaidu Language oforigjnal: Source oftext: Introduction: TIlls is a list ofAsma'u's students, which is not exhaustive, since it covers only the villages lying south and south-west of Sakata. Related texts None Sil,'1J.ificant features: The spellings reflect both pre-colonial pronunciations, and miswritings by copyists who did not understand what they were writing. For example, Bodinga (I. 8) is written "Bodiyga" which was perhaps the received pronunciation at the time. Also, as is always the case, transliterations frequently lead to complications. To take the example again ofBodinga: Ogunbiyi (1982) transliterates this as Butighay, Shuni as Sun, Chacho as Shasu,Jaredi as Jarita, Kilgori as Kilghur, and so on. This is not to criticise Ogunbiyi, but rather to higWight the difficulties involved in this work. The place names were transcribed for this version by AlKali Sidi Sayucfi who knows the area, knows what the traditional spelling conventions are and instantly recognised some, but not all, ofthe place names. The ulama of Malam Boyi's Islamic College recognised enough of the names for them to feel confident that all were in the three districts of DanCadi, Shuni and Bodinga, that is to say to the south-west of Sokoto. The places in some cases are difficult to locate. Take the case of Muhammad Dikko (line 3): this is a perfectly ordinary man's name: his womenfolk were Asma'u's students. But it is nearly impossible to locate this man's house after a lapse of 150 years. Other examples in this category are the homes of Muhammad Faruji, Abubakar Magau, and Bello Bomau. There are places which have the I-Iausa suffix "awa" meaning "people of' - 73agarawa, Bagalawa, Zangalawa, Madorawa and Gingawa. These are also difficult to trace, to say nothing ofthe possibilities that some places have disappeared altogether. Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u in English List ofAsma'u Students n.d. 375 Work 64 Arabic Waziri Junaidu Language oforigjnal: Source oftext: Introduction: TIlls is a list ofAsma'u's students, which is not exhaustive, since it covers only the villages lying south and south-west of Sakata. Related texts None Sil,'1J.ificant features: The spellings reflect both pre-colonial pronunciations, and miswritings by copyists who did not understand what they were writing. For example, Bodinga (I. 8) is written "Bodiyga" which was perhaps the received pronunciation at the time. Also, as is always the case, transliterations frequently lead to complications. To take...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781609170653
Related ISBN
9780870134753
MARC Record
OCLC
605316199
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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