In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u in English Language of original: Source oftext: Introduction: Signs ofthe Day of Judgment Sharuddan Kivama n.d. Hausa Waziri Junaidu 295 Work 59 This poem was written to scare people. Asma'u said the signs of the Day of Judgment were known (v. 12) and some had already occurred (v.l7). Soon it would be too late: the Day of Judgment was nigh (v. I0) and the days were fast approaching the end (v. 16). Signs of the Day of Judgment, along with other literature of the same genre, was aimed at establishing practical longterm sanctions against any tendency to resort to magic. The Islamic eschatology was radically different from the Hausa traditional understanding of what happens after death. Muslims, newly converted or partially persuaded, had to be convinced about the Day of Judgment and the punishment of Hell to prevent them from resorting to traditional powers. "If there is no Day of Judgment nor any threat of physical torment, what is there to stop one using magic?" (Last 1988188n.) The poem is also about power and authority. Shariah (Law) had ways in which it enforced behavior through statutory punishment: an alternative way was to convince them that their behaviour on earth would be evaluated on the Day of Judgment. Eschatology can act as a restraining force and should not be viewed as "mere theology" by those of us unfamiliar with the ways in which Heaven and Hell had the outline of geographical locations to our forebears, Islamic, Christian and Jewish alike. Lastly, the content matter challenges us to speculate on Asma'u's understanding of the symbolism she used. Some scholarly interpretations of the symbols (which are to some extent common to Islam, Christianity, and Judaism) speak of the combat myth which told of the battle between God and Light, and the Monster of Chaos. It may well be that she believed that the earthquake, fire, and beast she spoke of were symbols, not only of the hostility of God and worldly political disorder, but timeless and set within a framework of eternity. Perhaps Gog and Magog represented to her the resilience of evil which can summon reinforcements from beyond the frontiers Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works afNana Asma 'u in English Signs ofthe Day of JUdgment Sharuddan Kiyama n.d. Work 59 295 Language oforiginal: Hausa Source oftext: Waziri Junaidu Introduction: This poem was written to scare people. Asma'u said the signs of the Day of Judgment were known (v. 12) and some had already occun'ed (v.l7). Soon it would be too late: the Day of Judgment was nigh (v. 10) and the days were fast approaching the end (v. 16). Signs of the Day of Judgment, along with other literature of the same genre, was aimed at establishing practical longterm sanctions against any tendency to resort to magic. The Islamic eschatology was radically different from the Hausa traditional understanding of what happens after death. Muslims, newly converted or partially persuaded, had to be convinced about the Day of Judgment and the punishment of Hell to prevent them from resorting to traditional powers. "If there is no Day of Judgment nor any threat of physical torment, what is there to stop one using magic?" (Last 1988: 188n.) The poem is also about power and authority. Shariah (Law) had ways in which it enforced behavior through statutory punishment: an alternative way was to convince them that their behaviour on earth would be evaluated on the Day of Judgment Eschatology can act as a restraining force and should not be viewed as "mere theology" by those of us unfanliliar with the ways in which Heaven and Hell had the outline of geographical locations to our forebears, Islamic, Christian and Jewish alike. Lastly, the content matter challenges us to speculate on Asma'u's understanding of the symbolism she used. Some scholarly interpretations of the symbols (which are to some extent common to Islam, Christianity, and Judaism) speak of the combat myth which told of the battle between God and Light, and the Monster of Chaos. It may well be that she believed that the earthquake, fire, and beast she spoke ofwere symbols, not only of the hostility of God and worldly political disorder, but timeless and set within a framework of eternity. Perhaps Gog and Magog represented to her the resilience of evil which can summon reinforcements from beyond the frontiers Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works afNana Asma 'u in English Signs...

pdf

Additional Information

ISBN
9781609170653
Related ISBN
9780870134753
MARC Record
OCLC
605316199
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.