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198 Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u Come friends, let us prepare ourselves. Language of original: Source oftext: Introduction Fulfulde Elegy for Gid'ad'o Sonnore Gid'ad'o 184811849 - 1265 Waziri lunaidu Work 28 This is an elegy for Asma'u's husband. In it she lists his personal qualities (e.g. generosity, v.ll) and the work he did in connection with city buildings (he was in charge of the city gates, v.lS) and the strengthening of the ideology of the Caliphate (he reiterated the Shehu's message v. 18). She omits references to his position - as Waziri he was second only to the Caliph in authority - or to his role as roving emissary, keeper of the chancery and warrior. These omissions are a significant indication that what Asma'u valued and wanted others to respect in commemoration of Gicfacfo was his character, not his worldly status. Gicfacfo was the nickname for Uthman b. Abubakar Sambo Laima. His father was a scholar; his mother Hussainatu was distantly related to the Shehu's family. Born in Kambaza near Gwandu in about 1776 he was given the name "Gicfacfo" (F.) which means "beloved"; by this he was known for the rest of his life. The nickname is more usually given to a boy called Muhammad, so "Muhammad Gicfacfo" meant Muhammad the Beloved, as if referring to the Prophet. His parents migrated to Degel to join the Shehu's Community and his father died there. As a young man he became friendly with Muhammad Bello and they went together on long expeditions in search of books. During the period 1804-08 he was a special envoy linking the Shehu, with Bello, one of the principal army commanders. In 1807 just before the major assault on the fortress AllCalawa he married Bello's sister, Asma'u. In the period 1808-17 Gicfacfo had a personal position in Bello's household - a kind of aide-de-camp and principal secretary. On Bello's election as Caliph, Gicfacfo became Waziri with full executive powers. The only limits on his authority were that he could not appoint his own successor, he could not depose any of the Caliph's appointees, and he could not depose the 198 Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works oJNana Asma 'u Come friends, let us prepare ourselves. Elegy for Gicfacfo SOn/lOre Gid'ad'o 1848/l 849 - 1265 Work 28 Language of original: Fulfulde Source of text: Waziri Junaidu Introduction This is an elegy for Asma'u's husband. In it she lists his personal qualities (e.g. generosity, v.ll) and the work he did in connection with city buildings (he was in charge of the city gates, v.IS) and the strengthening of the ideology of the Caliphate (he reiterated the Shehu's message v. 18). She omits references to his position - as Waziri he was second only to the Caliph in authority - or to his role as roving emissary, keeper of the chancery and warrior. These omissions are a significant indication that what Asma'u valued and wanted others to respect in commemoration of Gicfacfo was his character, not his worldly status. Gicfacfo was the nickname for Uthman b. Abubakar Sambo Laima. His father was a scholar; his mother Hussainatu was distantly related to the Shehu's family. Bom in Kambaza near Gwandu in about 1776 he was given the name "Gid'acfo" (F.) which means "beloved"; by this he was known for the rest of his life. The nickname is more usually given to a boy called Muhammad, so "Muhammad Gicfacfo" meant Muhammad the Beloved, as if refen'ing to the Prophet. His parents migrated to Degel to join the Shehu's Community and his father died there. As a young man he became friendly with Muhanullad Bello and they went together on long expeditions in search of books. During the period 1804-08 he was a special envoy linking the Shehu, with Bello, one of the principal anny commanders. In 1807 just before the major assault on the fortress A1R:alawa he married Bello's sister, Asma'u. In the period 1808-17 Gicfacfo had a personal position in Bello's household - a kind of aide-dc-camp and principal secretUIy. On Bello's election as Caliph, Gicfad'o became Waziri with full executive powers. The only limits on his authority were that he could not appoint his own successor, he could not depose any of the Caliph's appointees, and he could not...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781609170653
Related ISBN
9780870134753
MARC Record
OCLC
605316199
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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