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156 Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u you may know when he arrived in Medina.375 The Closing Line: Completed in praise ofGod and with the goodness ofhis assistance. Language oforigjnal: Source ofText: Introduction The Story ofthe Shehu Ko'jwi i' Shehu I Labaran Shehu 1841 - 1257/1258: 1864 - 1280/1281 FuIfuldelHausa Photocopy from Bayero University, Kanol Bello Sa'id (1973) Works 22/50 This work, written first by Asma'u in Fulfulde and later translated into Hausa by Isa b. Shehu, details the life of the Shehu.376 Verses 19-72 contain the names of the Shehu's brothers, sisters, wives, and children. Biographical details ofhis brother Abdullahi cfan Fodiyo are given in verses 20-22 and of his son Bello in verses 73-80. Many of the names were capable oftriggering memories, giving rise to discussions round the fires and places where women spun thread. While to the unknowing it was a tedious list ofnames, to the initiated it had talismatic properties. '" Asma'u's use oframzi, in which numerical value is given.to Arabic letters, is commonto the genre, but in transliteration, this signification presents problems. For instance, .Jalbu shukrin (Ar.)= 1305 by this method: ja= 3; 1=30; b=2; sh=lOOO; k=20; r=200;n=50; total is 1235, which is 1820 AD. (Is this, therefore, her first poem?) Or, ifn is instead r, and attached tothe fullowing word, thenjalbu shukri = 1305-50 (i.e. minus n)=I 255=I 839. Hiskett notes frrs!, that numerical values cannot be given to letters once they have been transliterated into roman script, and second, that the numbering system used by the Hausa (with its origins in North Africa), gives different values to some letters than those normally attributed to them (1975: 169). "'This and Work 20/51 are examples ofshared authorship that are typical ofthe time and genre; a work by one author often was translated by another and attributed to the transIator as hlsIber own work.The reader is referred to Hiskett's commentary on ascriptions ofRausa and Fulfulde works, in which he observes that when substsntia1 differences ooeur in the translation of a work from one language to another, then the latter author has "some claUn to originality" (1975: xv). He advises that aresderlook fortbe JtUIIldatmy envoy in such translations, its absence indicatingthatthe poem's language is that ofits original composition. Conversely, some works by popular authors retained ascriptionto their first authors, even in translated form, and even withthe mandatory envoy by translators. This is the case for works like these by Nana Asma'u. 156 Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u you may know when he arrived in Medina.375 The Closing Line: Completed in praise of God and with the goodness ofhis assistance. Works 22/50 Language oforiginal: Source of Text: The Story ofthe Shehu Ko'iwi i' Shehu / Labaran Shehu 1841 - 125711258: 1864 - 1280/1281 FulfuldelHausa Photocopy from Bayero University, Kanol Bello Sa'id (1973) Introduction This work, written first by Asma'u in Fulfulde and later translated into Hausa by Isa b. Shehu, details the life of the Shehu.J76 Verses 19-72 contain the names of the Shehu's brothers, sisters, wives, and children. Biographical details of his brother Abdullahi dan Fodiyo are given in verses 20-22 and of his son Bello in verses 73-80. Many of the names were capable of triggering memories, giving rise to discussions round the fires and places where women spun thread. While to the unknowing it was a tedious list of names, to the initiated it had talismatic properties. mAsma'u's use oframzi, in which numerical value is given.to Arabic letters, is common to the genre, but in transliteration, this signification presents problems. For inglance, .la/bu shukrin (Ar.)= 1305 by this method:ja= 3; /=30; b=2; sh=1000; k=20; r=200;n=50; total is J235, which is 1820 A.D. (Is this, therefore, her flfSt poem 7) Or, ifn is instead r, and attached to the tollowing word, thonja/bu shukri ~ 1305ยท50 (i.e. minus n)~1255=1839. Hiskett notes fim, that numerical values cannot be given to letters once they have been transliterated into roman script, and second, that the numbering system used by the Hausa (with its origins in North Africa), gives different values to some letters than those normally attributed to them (1975: 169). "'This and Work 20151 are examples ofshared authorship that are typical ofthe time and genre...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781609170653
Related ISBN
9780870134753
MARC Record
OCLC
605316199
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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