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Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u in English You know where he went, And remember "God is our helper". Here the poem is complete. Language of original: Source oftext" Introduction: Fulfulde Bello's Character Gikku Bello 1838/1839-1254 Waziri Junaidu 89 Work 14 This memorial to Bello is the single most useful biographical work that exists. It is clearly an appreciation of Bello that represents him as a man to be emulated. Asma'u's praise of him addresses his learning, unworldliness, level-headedness, uprightness, preparedness, intelligence, and resourcefulness. What is omitted is any reference to Bello's military campaigns, the baraka he inherited from his father, his position as Caliph, and the miracles ascribed to him by Asma'u's husband Gid'ad'o in his book Al-Kashfwa'I bqyiin which was written the same year as this poem. What is also omitted is the fact that he was in daily correspondence with half of Saharan Africa, he was good-looking (Clapperton 1826), and was a consununate swordsman, calling his sword higo (F., friend) (it disappeared at the Battle ofBurmi in 1904). Instead, Asma'u focuses in this work on qualities valued in the context of sufism, not qualities of character related to his position in the world. One would not know from this poem that Bello had been the Caliph. In Asma'u's poem The Battle of Gawakuke (Work 38), she referred to Bello as a saint (v.72) and in the same poem described how Bello miraculously found water at a crucial time prior to the battle (v.38), She also said (vv.63,64) that Bello prophesied further battles to come, and a drought. However there are no references to miracles and prophesies in any of her other works even those, like Bello's Character which are solely about him. It is customary in contemporary society to praise a person for accumulated wealth, status, collections of valuable items, marriages - whatever an individual does or has that establishes a noteworthy place in the culture. Furthermore, Hausa praise singers rely on bombast to describe their subject (Sa'idu 1981). These approaches are not taken in this elegy. Thus, from Asma'u's omissions we learn much about her perceptions and Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works. ofNana Asma 'u in Eng/ish You know where he went, And remember "God is our helper". Here the poem is complete. Work 14 Bello's Character G;kku Bello 1838/1839-1254 89 Language oforiginal: Fulfulde Source oftext· Waziri Junaidu Introduction: This memorial to Bello is the single most useful biographical work that exists. It is clearly an appreciation of Bello that represents him as a man to be emulated. Asma'u's praise of him addresses his learning, unworldliness, level-headedness, uprightness, preparedness, intelligence, and resourcefulness. What is omitted is any reference to Bello's military campaigns, the baraka he inherited from his father, his position as Caliph, and the miracles ascribed to him by Asma'u's husband Gilfalfo in his book AI-Kashfwa'/ bq,Win which was written the same year as this poem What is also omitted is the fact that he was in daily correspondence with half of Saharan Africa, he was good-looking (Clapperton 1826), and was a consummate swordsman, calling his sword higo (F., friend) (it disappeared at the Battle of Burrni in 1904). Instead, Asma'u focuses in this work on qualities valued in the context of sufism, not qualities of character related to his position in the world. One would not know from this poem that Bello had been the Caliph. In Asma'u's poem The Battle of Gawakuke (Work 38), she referred to Bello as a saint (v.72) and in the same poem described how Bello miraculously found water at a crucial time prior to the battle (v.38), She also said (vv.63,64) that Bello prophesied further battles to come, and a drought. However there are no references to miracles and prophesies in any of her other works even those, like Bello's Character which are solely about him. It is customary in contemporary society to praise a person for accumulated wealth, status, collections of valuable items, marriages - whatever an individual does or has that establishes a noteworthy place in the culture. Furthermore, Hausa praise singers rely on bombast to describe their subject (Sa'idu 1981). These approaches are not taken in this elegy. Thus, from Asma'u's omissions we learn much about her...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781609170653
Related ISBN
9780870134753
MARC Record
OCLC
605316199
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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