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48 Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNana Asma 'u in English For Muhammadu who excelled, Be sure ofGod's Truth. Shehu composed the original version ofthis song Nana translated it into Hausa Isa wrote the takhmfs, In Hausa, and the reason was To bring this warning, Be sure of God's Truth. A Waming,I If.a:!W. 183311834-1249 Work 7 LanlWage oforiginal: Fulfulde Waziri Junaidu Source oftext: Introduction: 57 This poem was written to teach Muslim students what their basic religious obligations were - prayer, alms, fasting, pilgrimage, and belief in God's Oneness. As a teacher of teachers, Asma'u does not seek distance from her students, but counts herself among those who need to be taught to practice humility: "May I be rescued from the wicked ways of Satan into which I have fallen through my own obstinacy"( v.22). Her father wrote the following on the need for a teacher to be understanding: When the proud man teaches he is not courteous to his students. He looks down upon them. He is very condescending towards them and exploits them. He looks at the common people as if he were looking at asses. He thinks that they are ignorant and despicable (In the Shehu's Ihsan: 36). This is a clear indication ofAsma'u's own source offormal and moral education. Related texts: Asma'u's own knowledge of Islam, rather than specific sources, seems to be most important to this work. Significant features: This simplified version of obligations may have been written for children. Its language 48 Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNanaAsma'u in English For Muhammadu who excelled, Be sure ofGod's Truth. Shehu composed the original version ofthis song Nana translated it into Hausa Isa wrote the takhmfs, In Hausa, and the reason was To bring this warning, Be sure of God's Truth. Work 7 A Warning, I Wa'azi l8331I834-1249 57 Fulfulde Waziri Junaidu I.an'Wage oforigjnal: Source oftext: Introduction: This poem was written to teach Muslim students what their basic religious obligations were - prayer, alms, fasting, pilgrimage, and belief in God's Oneness. As a teacher of teachers, Asma'u does not seek distance from her students, but counts herself among those who need to be taught to practice humility: "May I be rescued from the wicked ways of Satan into which I have fallen through my own obstinacy"( v.22). Her father wrote the following on the need for a teacher to be understanding: When the proud man teaches he is not courteous to his students. He looks down upon them. He is very condescending towards them and exploits them. He looks at the cornmon people as if he were looking at asses. He thinks that they are ignorant and despicable (In the Shehu's Ihsiin: 36). This is a clear indication ofAsma'u's own source offormal and moral education. Related texts: Asma'u's own knowledge of Islam, rather than specific sources, seems to be most important to this work. Significant features: This simplified version of obligations may have been written for children. Its language 48 Boyd & Mack/The Collected Works ofNanaAsma'u in English For Muhammadu who excelled, Be sure ofGod's Truth. Shehu composed the original version ofthis song Nana translated it into Hausa Isa wrote the takhmfs, In Hausa, and the reason was To bring this warning, Be sure of God's Truth. Work 7 A Warning,. Wa'azi l8331I834-1249 57 Fulfulde Waziri Junaidu I.an'Wage oforigjnal: Source oftext: Introduction: This poem was written to teach Muslim students what their basic religious obligations were - prayer, alms, fasting, pilgrimage, and belief in God's Oneness. As a teacher of teachers, Asma'u does not seek distance from her students, but counts herself among those who need to be taught to practice humility: "May I be rescued from the wicked ways of Satan into which I have fallen through my own obstinacy"( v.22). Her father wrote the following on the need for a teacher to be understanding: When the proud man teaches he is not courteous to his students. He looks down upon them. He is very condescending towards them and exploits them. He looks at the cornmon people as if he were looking at asses. He thinks that they are ignorant and despicable (In the Shehu's Ihsiin: 36). This is a clear indication ofAsma'u's own source offormal and moral education. Related texts: Asma'u's own knowledge of Islam, rather...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781609170653
Related ISBN
9780870134753
MARC Record
OCLC
605316199
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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