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The Essential Nana Asma'u Historical Context: Nineteenth Centuty Hausaland The background to Shehu Usman dan Fodiyo's nineteenth century Sokoto Jihad is well known and has been discussed at length in many scholarly works (see especially Hiskett 1973; Last 1967). It involves the confluence of several major forces ofcompetition in the region: Islam, commerce, and a tenuous balance of control by several ethnic groups. Turmoil in eighteenth century Hausaland resulted from centuries of competition over trade routes and cultural hegemony in that part of the western Sudan. Islam, which had been introduced as early as the eleventh century, continued to be a pervasive influence in the area at the time of these struggles. Throughout the centuries of indigenous Hausa rule in the region, Fulani immigrants - many of whom were Muslim scholars - had become influential advisors to the Hausa kings. The latter embraced Islam outwardly, as a symbol of affiliation with Arab trans-Saharan traders, and an indicator of their prestige. But the Fulani Muslim scholars recognized that continued adherence to non-Islamic customs, practiced by Fulani and Hausa alike, threatened the integrity ofIslam. One such scholar was the charismatic Shehu Usman dan Fodiyo, whose compelling manner of preaching Islam over thirty years in the area (1774-1804) gained for him an everincreasing following. Such popularity was perceived by the kings of Gobir as a threat to their power. Therefore the Shehu was forbidden to preach; he was harassed, his life was threatened, and his efforts to educate and mediate peaceful reconciliation were rejected by local rulers. Anticipating the eventuality of open conflict, the Shehu and his followers prepared themselves. By the time they were attacked, they were able to respond by launching a three-pronged foray against those who sought to suppress the Shehu's revivalist movement. This active stage of the Shehu's struggle to promote right Islam came to be known as the Sokoto Jihad, whose aim was to end adherence to non-Muslim customs that functioned to suppress the practice and promotion ofIslam. Every able-bodied person in the Fodiyo clan gave active support. Principal among those riding into battle were the Shehu's brother Abdullahi, and his son Muhanunad Bello, each of The Essential Nana Asma'u Historical Context: Nineteenth Centun' Hausaland The background to Shehu Usman aan Fodiyo's nineteenth century Sokoto Jihad is well known and has been discussed at length in many scholarly works (see especially Hiskett 1973; Last 1967). It involves the confluence of several major forces of competition in the region: Islam, commerce, and a tenuous balance of control by several ethnic groups. Turmoil in eighteenth century Hausaland resulted from centuries of competition over trade routes and cultural hegemony in that part of the western Sudan. Islam, which had been introduced as early as the eleventh century, continued to be a pervasive influence in the area at the time of these struggles. Throughout the centuries of indigenous Hausa mle in the region, Fulani immigrants - many of whom were Muslim scholars - had become influential advisors to the Hausa kings. The latter embraced Islam outwardly, as a symbol of affiliation with Arab trans-Saharan traders, and an indicator of their prestige. But the Fulani Muslim scholars recognized that continued adherence to non-Islamic customs, practiced by Fulani and Hausa alike, threatened the integrity ofIslam. One such scholar was the charismatic Shehu Usman aan Fodiyo, whose compelling manner of preaching Islam over thirty years in the area (1774-1804) gained for him an everincreasing following. Such popularity was perceived by the kings of Gobir as a threat to their power. Therefore the Shehu was forbidden to preach; he was harassed, his life was threatened, and his efforts to educate and mediate peaceful reconciliation were rejected by local mlers. Anticipating the eventuality of open conflict, the Shehu and his followers prepared themselves. By the time they were attacked, they were able to respond by launching a three-pronged foray against those who sought to suppress the Shehu's revivalist movement. This active stage of the Shehu's struggle to promote right Islam came to be known as the Sokoto Jihad, whose aim was to end adherence to non-Muslim customs that functioned to suppress the practice and promotion of Islam. Every able-bodied person in the Fodiyo clan gave active support. Principal among those riding into battle were the Shehu's brother Abdullahi, and his son Muhanunad Bello, each of The Essential Nana Asma'u Historical Context: Nineteenth Centun' Hausaland The background to Shehu...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781609170653
Related ISBN
9780870134753
MARC Record
OCLC
605316199
Launched on MUSE
2012-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
No
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