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14. Earl Black and Merle Black, Politics and Society in the South (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1987), 13. 15. Associated Press, “Census: Blacks Moving Back to the South at Record Pace,” St. Petersburg Times, October 31, 2003, http://www.sptimes.com/2003/ 10/31/Worldandnation/Census__Blacks_moving.shtml (accessed January 4, 2009). 16. Associated Press. 17. Kurt Badenhausen, “The Best States for Business,” Forbes, August 16, 2006, http://www.forbes.com/2006/08/15/best-states-business_cz_kb_0815 beststates.html (accessed January 4, 2009). 18. Robert Atkinson and Scott Andes, “The 2008 State New Economy Index: Benchmarking Economic Transformation in the States,” Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, November 18, 2008, http://www. itif.org/index.php?id=200. 19. V. O. Key, Southern Politics in State and Nation (Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1984), 4. 20. Matt Lassiter, Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2006). 21. See Michael W. Giles, “Percent Black and Racial Hostility: An Old Assumption Revisited,” Social Science Quarterly 58 (December 1977): 412–17, and Marylee C. Taylor, “How White Attitudes Vary with Racial Composition of Local Populations: Numbers Count,” American Sociological Review 63 (August 1998): 512–35. 22. Christopher Cooper and H. Gibbs Knotts, “Reflections on the 2008 Election,” UNC Press blog, November 13, 2008, http://uncpressblog.com/2008/ 11/13/reflections-on-the-2008-election/ (accessed January 4, 2009). Notes to Pages 243–248 ★ 277 Contributors Branwell DuBose Kapeluck is an associate professor of political science at The Citadel. A codirector of The Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics since 2004, he is the coauthor of “Southern Governors and Legislatures,” a chapter in Writing Southern Politics. Laurence W. Moreland is a professor of political science at The Citadel. He is codirector of the Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics and is the author and editor of a number of publications, including The 2000 Presidential Election in the South and Writing Southern Politics: Contemporary Interpretations and Future Directions. Robert P. Steed is a professor of political science at The Citadel. He is codirector of the Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics and is the author and editor of a number of publications, including Eye of the Storm: The South and Congress in an Era of Change and Writing Southern Politics: Contemporary Interpretations and Future Directions. Scott E. Buchanan is an assistant professor of political science at The Citadel and director of the Citadel Symposium on Southern Politics. He has written articles on partisan realignment in the South. In addition, he has been involved in oral histories of Georgia political figures of the 1950s and 1960s. Buchanan is also a past president of the Georgia Political Science Association. John A. Clark is a professor of political science at Western Michigan University. He has written numerous articles that have appeared in journals such as Legislative Studies Quarterly and the American Political Science Review. He has also contributed chapters to numerous edited works and was coeditor most recently of Southern Political Party Activists: Patterns of Conflict and Change, 1991–2001. Patrick R. Cotter is a professor of political science at the University of Alabama. His past affiliations with the Capstone Poll at the University of Alabama and the National Network of State Polls have focused much of his research and publication on public opinion and political behavior, especially in the South, but he has also done research on such topics as social services and the aging and voting behavior in Central America. He was a recent cocontributor to the edited work Southern Political Party Activists: Patterns of Conflict and Change, 1991–2001. Charles S. Bullock III is the Richard B. Russell Professor of Political Science at the University of Georgia. His areas of research include policy analysis, interest groups, legislative politics, and southern politics. He is the author of several books, including Runoff Elections in the United States, which was the winner of the 1993 V. O. Key Award. He has published in a wide array of journals 279 including the American Political Science Review, Journal of Politics, and, most, recently the Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy. Robert E. Hogan is an associate professor of political science at Louisiana State University. He studies various aspects of American electoral politics. In particular his research interests focus on campaigns, political parties, and interest groups at the state level. He is the author of numerous articles appearing in journals such as Journal of Women, Politics, and Policy; American Review of Politics; and American Journal of Political Science. He has also...

Additional Information

ISBN
9781610750035
Related ISBN
9781557289155
MARC Record
OCLC
769114785
Pages
360
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-11
Language
English
Open Access
No
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