publisher colophon

NDEX

Abwehrorganisation (Abwehrvereine). See Antidefamation; Centralverein

Academia, 26–27. See also Antisemitism, universities and; East European Jews, as students

Acculturation versus dissimilation, 15, 34, 36, 52, 53, 55, 60, 62, 71, 72, 99, 101, 142, 165, 171n. 1, 199n. 8, 203n. 49, 203n. 50

Adelson, Leslie A., 217n. 19

Advertising, 16, 44–45, 46 (fig. 4), 48, 102, 162, 201n. 24

Agnon, Shmu’el Yosef, 186n. 20

Agudat Yisrael (Agudes Yisroel), 69

Aḥad Ha190n. 67

Aleichem, Sholem, 45, 68

Allgemeine Zeitung des Judentums, 31, 40, 74

Alliance Israélite Universelle, 45, 47, 134, 146, 180n. 77, 182n. 104, 182n. 106, 203n. 45

Altneuland controversy, 38–39, 72, 95, 179n. 72, 180n. 76

Anderson, Benedict, 33

Antidefamation (and apologetic anti-antisemitism), 37, 152, 157, 160, 161, 162, 164, 166; in the framework of Abwehrorganisationen, 84, 143; See also Centralverein

Antisemitism, 21, 22–23, 24, 33, 34, 50, 67, 70, 78, 79, 80, 81, 84, 88, 90, 111, 136, 140, 151, 154, 165, 166, 167, 169; antijudaism versus, 165; Antisemitic Petition of 1881–82 and, 66, 80; compared with anti-Germanism, 148; comparative European, 27, 36, 151, 166, 167, 169, 179n. 66; during the Weimar period, 159–61; during World War I, 142, 160; ethnic conflict and, 161; in modern German history, 160; in the professions, 67, 79–80; Jewish apologetics for, 34, 142, 147, 150; Jewish “discourse” and, 146; Jewish psychology and, 143; political parties and, 37, 66; racialistic, 34, 65, 79, 165; universities and, 25–26, 79, 192nn. 7, 8, 10, 193n. 12; war profiteering stereotype and, 153, 157, 211n. 11. See also Self-hatred

Apostates. See Conversion to Christianity

Arendt, Hannah, 192n. 1

Art, 16, 27, 45; decorative, 118, 119 (fig. 12); Eastern Jewish, 96; patrons and collectors of, 45, 115–16, 202n. 47; photography and, 42. See also Marketing and audience; and individual artists

Artists, 116, 124; women, 118. See also individual entries

Asch, Sholem, 45

Aschheim, Steven, 18, 19, 20, 173n. 19

Ashkenazic Jewry, 17, 34, 59

Assimilationism, 30, 75, 81; as stereotype, 70–71 See also Parvenu stereotype; Self-hatred

Audience. See Marketing and audience

Auerbach, Berthold, 86

Austro-Hungary (Habsburg Empire): Jews in, 22, 23, 29, 40, 80, 133, 169, 176n. 36; compared with Jews in Germany, 29, 36

Autonomism, Jewish cultural, 29, 35, 152, 163, 169; Diaspora nationalism, 35, 69; kehillah as model for, 186n. 15

Ba193n. 21. See also Acculturation versus dissimilation

Bakst, Leo, 205n. 76

Bar Kochba, 149

Baron Hirsch (and The Jewish Colonial Association), 133, 203n. 44

Baron Hirsch schools, 133

Bauer, Felice, 73, 101. See also Kafka, Franz

Baum, Vicki, 117, 120–34, 137, 205n. 73, 208n. 102; “Im alten Haus,” 118, 120; “Rafael Gutmann,” 118, 120–34, 207n. 94

Beethoven, Ludwig von, 108, 127, 130; Fidelio, 127–28, 130

“Beethoven’s erste Liebe,” 108

Befreiungskriege, 149

Benjamin, Walter, 141

Berdichevsky, Micha Yosef (Bin Gurion), 124, 178n. 61, 191n. 82

Berkowitz, Michael, 178n. 62

Berlin: Jews in, 15, 26, 28, 30, 60, 85, 88, 96, 100, 102, 115, 125, 162; East European Jewry in, 25, 160, 175n. 16; Jewish settlement in, 92, 175n. 16, 197n. 60; Salondamen in, 100–101, 200n. 10; Tiergarten neighborhood, 92–93. See also Ost und West; Pogroms, Scheunenviertel

Berlin Jüdische Lesehalle (und Bibliothek), 30, 31, 32 (fig. 1), 177n. 42

Berliner Illustrirte Zeitung, 44

Bernfeld, Simon, 16

Betteljuden, 21, 22, 24, 59, 67

Bhabha, Homi, 199n. 8

Bible, 51, 60, 89; terms for, 196n. 53

Bigart, Jacques, 203n. 45

Bildung, 25, 59, 64, 101, 124, 188n. 40; as desired by East European Jews, 27, 110–11, 188n. 53. See also Respectability

Birnbaum, Nathan, 40, 45, 69–72, 79, 82, 191n. 78; “Das westjüdische Kulturproblem,” 69–70; “Etwas über Ost- und Westjudentum,” 71

Bismarck, Otto von, 167

Blacks and Africa, 198n. 65; East European Jews and, 198n. 65; in the fiction of Ost und West, 93, 94

Bodenheimer, Max, 177n. 41

Brainin, Ruben, 177n. 46

Breines, Paul, 145, 209n. 118, 213n. 34

Brenner, Michael, 186n. 20

Breslau, 114, 115

Brieger-Wasservogel, Lothar, 87, 89, 91, 196n. 48, 196n. 52; “Das alte Testament,” 89–90

Buber, Martin, 16, 17, 29, 36, 39, 40, 45, 82, 163, 177n. 41, 180n. 79, 181n. 95, 193n. 22, 212n. 31

Bund, Di, 21, 35, 82, 178n. 62

Butler, Judith, 217n. 23

Catholics, 37, 167

Centralverein deutscher Staatsbürger Jüdischen Glaubens, 31, 143, 162, 204n. 66

Chamberlain, Houston Stewart, 148, 198n. 65

Class, German-Jewish middle, 63, 65–66, 74, 144, 167–68, 189n. 61, 190n. 65, 192n. 7, 200n. 15; Besitzversus Bildungsbürgertum, 83, 138, 191n. 89; conflict within German-Jewish middle, 83, 84, 95, 103 (116 women); crisis of Bildungsproletariat, 79–80; historiography of middle, 181n. 96; middle-brow culture and, 44; terminology, 200n. 15, 210n. 1; the public sphere and development of, 200n. 10. See also Female readers; Generation gap; Male readers; Marketing and audience

Conservatism, political, 65, 66, 89. See also Nationalism

Conversion to Christianity (“apostasy”) or Baptism, 57, 60, 62, 80–81, 84, 85, 89, 93, 99, 108, 109, 110, 111, 154, 187n. 33, 194n. 34, 204n. 57, 212n. 18; as stereotype, 89, 146, 149; compared to Trotzjuden, 81, 193n. 16; susceptibility of university students to, 81, 193n. 15. See also Genres, anticonversion and anti-intermarriage fiction

Democratic Faction (Demokratische Fraktion) of Zionist Organization, 36, 37, 79, 82, 144, 178n. 61

Department stores, 46 (fig. 4), 102. See also Tietz family

Deutsche Rundschau, 73

Dissimilation. See Acculturation versus dissimilation

Dohm, Christian Wilhelm von, 62, 63, 70

Dolorosa, 118

Domestic workers, 107

Dreyfus trials, 21, 36

Dubnow, Simon, 35. See also Autonomism

East European Jews, 15–16, 21–32, 40, 47, 77, 86, 168; as students, 25, 80, 192n. 10, 210n. 4; as source of embarrassment for Western Jews, 19, 173n. 15; “cult” of the Ostjuden, 18, 47–48, 72, 81, 157–58, 162–63, 212n. 31, 217n. 16; during the Weimar period, 160; demographics, 179n. 67; forced labor in Germany and, 140, 160; Galician versus Russian, 29; gender, 99, 199n. 3; German language and, 40; marriage with Western Jews, 203n. 49; negative portrayal of, 196n. 50; stereotype of the “ghetto Jew,” 64, 122–27, 67, 70, 100, 180n. 82, 199n. 6; shtetl romanticism and, 77, 156, 163; post-Holocaust renaissance of, 163, 173n. 11; promotion of by means of positive and negative stereotyping, 49, 77–78, 99–100, 108, 162, 163; public-sphere symbiosis with Western Jewry and, 156, 195n. 41. See also Berlin; Bildung; Eastern/traditional model of Judaism; Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness; Female readers; German Jewry; Immigration of East European Jews to Germany; Intellectual readers; Marketing and audience; Male readers; Masculinity; Ostjuden; Philanthropy; Ost und West; Pogroms; Respectability; Western Jewry

Eastern/traditional model of Judaism, 44, 55–59, 75, 76, 88–90, 100–101, 108–9, 153–54, 162

Edinburgh Review, 74

Education and schools. See Female readers; Maskilim

Efron John, 184n. 122

Ehrenpreis, Markus, 29

Einstein, Albert, 141

Elias, Norbert, 173n. 15

Emancipation (of Jews), 24, 36, 37, 59, 62, 63, 167, 189n. 55

England, Jews in, 60, 80, 85. See also Antisemitism; Immigration of East European Jews to Germany

Enlightenment: European, 15, 17, 25, 34, 36, 41, 56, 57, 144; German (Aufklärung), 62, 167

Enlightenment, Jewish. See Haskalah

Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness and Pan-Jewishness (or Jewish nationalism, Jewish Renaissance), 15, 16, 20, 30, 31, 32, 33, 39, 42, 44, 48, 51–52, 53–54, 56, 67–76, 79–81, 82, 101–2, 103–4, 110–12, 123, 137, 144, 145, 151, 152, 154–57, 160, 167, 168, 192n. 6, 194n. 31, 217n. 11; Eastern compared with Western, 33, 36, 37, 69, 73; gender and, 199n. 2; Orthodoxy and, 72, 144; state versus cultural Jewish nationalism, 35, 40; stereotyping and, 52, 54; terminology, 172n. 3, 185n. 4; universalism versus particularism, 41, 155; visibility and conspicuousness of, 16, 35, 42, 44, 85, 86, 140, 143, 169; Zivilisation versus Kultur, 70–71. See also Female readers; Male readers; Pluralism, cultural; Marketing and audience; Stereotyping

Ethnic magazines: Ost und West as prototype, 53, 159.

Ethnicity: as source of competition and conflict, 161; contemporary American, 159, 167; in Kaiserreich, 167. See also Antisemitism; Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness; Pluralism, cultural

Ethnography, 147, 216n. 75

Feiwel, Berthold, 36, 197n. 57

Female readers (of Ost und West), 44, 98–138; Alliance Israélite Universelle and, 105; artistic depiction of, 104, 106; as consumers (of culture), 100–103, 202n. 32 (reading habits); class and, 103, 116, 132, 201n. 25; domesticity and family and, 99, 100, 102, 103, 111; education and, 101, 103, 136; historiography and, 102, 210n. 3; Jewish Women’s League (Jüdischer Frauenbund) and, 104, 107, 118, 135; professional structure of, 99, 202n. 33; promotion of the uplifted (artist) Ostjude as object of idealization and philanthropy and, 99, 107, 110–37, 202n. 47; religious observance and, 100, 104, 199n. 4, 200n. 14, 202n. 34; social work and welfare, 104–6, 116–23, 202n. 38; the middle-brow and, 103; urban modernity and, 102, 200n. 16; women’s organizations and, 202n. 39. See also Male readers; Marketing and audience; Parvenu stereotype, and parvenue stereotype; Philanthropy

Femininity. See Masculinity

Film, 16, 162, 205n. 75

Fishman, Joshua, 82, 186

Fliegende Blätter, 91, 141

Folklore, 29, 44, 45, 116; See also Ethnography; Music

Forchheimer, Stephanie, 135

Foucault, Michel, 174n. 20

France: Jews in, 60, 62, 80, 165, 187n. 35. See also Antisemitism; Immigration of East European Jews to Germany

Frankfurt am Main, 135, 207n. 93

Franzos, Karl Emil, 86, 88, 196n. 50

Freistatt, Die, 47, 96, 134

Freud, Sigmund, 22, 126

Freytag, Gustav, 87; Soll und Haben, 87, 114, 153, 215n. 69

Gartenlaube, Die, 103, 201n. 27

Geiger, Abraham, 163

Geiger, Ludwig, 31

Gelber, Mark H., 207n. 90

Gemeinschaft (community) versus Gesellschaft (society), 181n. 95

Gemneindeblatt der Jüdischen Gemeinde zu Berlin, 16, 103, 162, 201n. 24

Gender. See Masculinity

Generation gap, 81, 82, 83, 95, 193n. 18

Genres, 49; anticonversion and anti-intermarriage fiction, 86, 108, 109, 110–11, 130; Dorfgeschichte (“village story”), 86, 206n. 90; Ghettogeschichte (“ghetto story”), 86, 120, 123, 124, 125, 127, 206n. 90; historical fiction, 87; in Ost und West, 44, 182n. 100; in the Rundschauzeitschriften, 74; Eastern versus Western Jewish, 45; Realist novel, 87, 206n. 90; regionalism and Heimatkunst, 206n. 90; (Naturalist) satirical sketch, 196n. 51; specific functioning of, 151; (satirical) Zeitprosa (“contemporary prose fiction”), 78, 87, 88, 90, 92, 100, 129, 135–37, 197n. 57. See also Antidefamation; Journals, magazines, and newspapers; Naturalism; Ost und West; Ost und West, literary contest in

Gentz, Ismael, 112; “Im Tempel zu Tripolis,” 112, 113 (fig. 9)

German Jewry, 142, 166; as “subculture,” 66, 70, 74, 199n. 8; class profile, 65; nostalgia for the Kaiserreich, 161; political profile, 65; stereotypes of, 141, 165, 167, 173n. 16, 211n. 10; symbiosis and, 18, 89, 166, 218n. 33

Germany, contemporary: East/West distinctions, 9, 163, 172n. 5

Gilman, Sander, 19, 146–47, 164–65, 217n. 19

Glicenstein, Enrico [Henryk], 40, 115–16, 117 (fig. 11), 123, 205n. 71

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, 103, 109, 207n. 93

Goldstein, Moritz, 209n. 121

Gordon, Milton, 171n. 1

Gronemann, Sammy, 180n. 78, 214n. 41

Guggenheim, Ernst, 90; “Der Rabbi,” 90

Ha-Shiloah (Aḥad Ha74

Ha-Tsefirah (Sokolov, ed.), 31

Habsburg Empire. See Austro-Hungary

Harden, Maximilian, 149, 214n. 51

Hasidism, 17, 82, 163

Haskalah, 56, 59, 60, 67, 84, 167

Hebraism and Hebraists, 27, 51, 60, 67; Hebrew language and culture, 31, 40

Heijermans, Herman, 206n. 83; Ghetto, 206n. 83

Heine, Heinrich, 120, 123 (fig. 16), 130

Helphand, Alexander (Parvus), 29

Herder, Johann Gottfried, 172n. 3

Herz, Henriette, 100

Herzl, Theodor, 33, 36, 38, 39, 91, 95, 180n. 74, 180n. 78; Altneuland, 38; “Mauschel,” 91; Winz and, 38. See also Altneuland controversy; Zionism and Zionist organization

Hess, Moses, 36

Hirsch, Samson Raphael, 59

Hirshenberg, Samuel, 40, 118

Holocaust (Shoah or khurbn): and historiography, 18, 27, 95, 141, 142, 158, 163, 164, 165, 169, 209n. 114; and transference, 18, 141

Homosexuality, 64, 120, 130, 205n. 73. See Masculinity

Horch, Hans Otto, 206n. 86

Höxter, John, 93

Humanities and humanists, 26–27, 29, 80, 216n. 75; versus medicine and law as courses of study for East European Jews in Germany, 27

Humboldt, Wilhelm von, 62, 64

Identity, 172n. 2, 184n. 119; alternative identities, 130–31, 159; identity politics, 20. See Marketing and audience; Pluralism, cultural; Stereotyping

Immigration of East European Jews to Germany, 19, 21, 22, 23, 25, 37, 58, 62, 161, 217n. 9; administrative control and harassment, 24, 25, 161, 174n. 3; after World War I, 216n. 6; compared with Polish seasonal workers, 23, 24–25; deportation and expulsion, 24, 66, 80, 146, 160, 193n. 12; differences among immigrants, 20, 25, 160; during World War I, 160; emigration of recent immigrants, 160; foreign investment and, 23; illegal, 23, 27; motivations for, 25; naturalization, 24, 80, 168; professional restrictions, 23, 80, 160, 174n. 6; transmigration (to ships), 23, 25, 174n. 5. See also East European Jews; Philanthropy

Integration into German society. See Acculturation versus dissimilation

Intellectual readers, 77–97, 140. See also Democratic Faction (Demokratische Fraktion) of Zionist Organization; Male readers; Parvenu stereotype

Intellectuals, 16, 79, 165. See also Intellectual readers

Intermarriage, 56, 60, 80, 130, 142, 204n. 57. See also Genres, anticonversion and anti-intermarriage fiction

Israel. See Palestine

Israelit, Der, 31, 186n. 14

Israelisches Familienblatt, 31

Israëls, Jozef, 41

Jaffé, Robert, 16

Jahn, Friedrich Ludwig “Turnvater,” 64

Jeschurun, 212n. 17

Jewish Chronicle, 177n. 44

Jewish nationalism. See Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness

Jewish Renaissance. See Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness

Journalism, 18; as a “Jewish” profession, 80, 147

Journals, magazines, and newspapers, 13, 31, 42, 44, 51, 73, 80, 184n. 126, 185n. 1; as a means of imagining the nation, 44, 73; Hebrew-language press, 51–52, 124, 195n. 44; the Rundschauzeitschrift or Kulturrundschau (“national-cultural review”), 40, 73–74, 191n. 90; technology of, 42. See also Marketing and audience; names of specific publications

Jude, Der (Buber, ed.), 39, 47, 96, 161

Judenzählung (census of Jews in military), 140, 142, 151, 152, 157, 211n. 12

Jüdische Rundschau, Die (multiple eds.), 31, 32, 39, 40, 180n. 77, 218n. 29

Jüdische Volkspartei, 48, 160

Jüdischer Verlag: signet and Ost und West, 181n. 90

Jugendstil, 130, 192n. 6. See also Lilien, Ephraim Mose

Jung Israel, 28

Jünger, Ernst, 149

Jungmann, Max, 177n. 46

Kadimah, 28, 176n. 28

Kafka, Franz, 13, 22, 72–73, 95, 101, 141, 198n. 68; “Brief an den Vater,” 95; journals and, 13; minoritarian literature and, 13, 216n. 1

Kaplan, Marion, 165, 202n. 50

Karpeles, Gustav, 31

Katz Jacob, 66, 188n. 40

Kaufmann, Fritz Mordechai, 47, 82, 134, 163

Kaufmann, Hugo, 124; “Einheit” (from “Einheitsdenkmal”), 129 (fig. 18); “Freiheit” (from “Einheitsdenkmal”), 126 (fig. 17), 209n. 112; “Den Helfern in der Not,” 125 (fig. 16)

Kellner, Leon, 107

Key, Ellen, 199n. 4; Das Jahrhundert des Kindes, 199n. 4

Klausner, M. A., 199n. 1

Klee, Alfred, 195n. 41

Kohut, Adolf, 115, 120; “Lina Morgenstern,” 115

Komitee für den Osten, 152, 157, 158

Kompert, Leopold, 86

Königsberg, 115

Kraus, Karl, 126

Krochmal, Nathan, 68

Kunstwart, debate, 209n. 121

Labisch, Richard, 42

Lamm, Louis, 215n. 59

Landauer, Gustav, 181n. 95

Langer, Georg (Jírí), 72, 82

Lazarus, Nahida Ruth, 199n. 4; Das Jüdische Weib, 199n. 4

Lehmann, Siegfried, 101

Leipzig, 160

Lemberg, 29, 23n. 39

Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim, 60, 167, 187n. 34

Lessing, Theodor, 197n. 57; Jüdischer Selbsthaß 197n. 57

Levin, Shmarya, 28

Liberal Judaism, 31, 57, 86, 120, 185n. 10, 212n. 27

Liberalism, political: German, 37, 65, 167, 189n. 55, 189n. 56

Libraries (and Reading rooms), 30, 31, 102–3, 177n. 43

Liebermann, Max, 41, 112; “Weib mit Ziegen,” 112, 114 (fig. 10)

Lilien, Ephraim Mose, 16, 17, 39, 40, 41, 42, 118, 181n. 91, 197n. 57

Lippmann, Walter, 183n. 117

Lissauer, Ernst, 148

Literature, 45, 48, 111; as course of study, 26; Eastern Jewish, 45, 74. See names of specific texts; names of specific writers

Liturgy (Jewish), 153, 154; “liturgy of destruction,” 166. See also Yom Kippur

Loewe, Heinrich, 30, 31–32, 39, 79, 176n. 41, 177n. 55

Lublinski, Samuel, 16

Maimon, Salomon, 25

Male readers, 138, 139–58; as German nationalist, 139, 149, 150; age of, 141; Centralverein and, 140, 143; class and, 139; level of observance of, 142, 143; Zionism and, 144, 145; stereotype of the yekke, 141. See also Female readers; Intellectual readers; Parvenu stereotype

Mann, Thomas, 64, 208n. 105; Bekenntnisse eines Unpolitischen, 70

Marketing and audience, 16, 17, 20, 32, 39, 40, 44, 45, 49, 51, 52–53, 54, 63, 70, 75, 79, 96, 125, 139, 156, 157, 162, 180n. 78; the middle-brow and, 44, 63, 96, 103; women and, 99, 100, 101

Marr, Wilhelm, 37

Masculinity, 56, 112, 126, 127, 128, 132, 137, 148, 157, 213n. 36; as discursively “objective” or “neutral,” 132, 145–50, 214n. 47; Charakter (integrity) and, 81; in the military (Tauglichkeit), 137–38, 140–41, 142, 144, 145, 149, 153, 211n. 11, 215nn. 56, 67; in occupations and professions, 56, 79, 80, 160–61; image of the “tough Jew,” 143, 144, 145, 155, (149), 196n. 48, 213n. 34; nationalism and, 126 (fig. 17), 144; dueling and, 144; debating and, 28–29, 144; and East European Jewish males, 120, 123, 124, 126–28, 130–32, 134, 143, 145, 149, 154–55, 204n. 69, 209n. 114, 213n. 36; respectability and, 188n. 45, 207n. 93, 212n. 27; Zionism and, 64–65. See also Judenzählung; Male readers; World War I

Maskilim, 26, 28, 68, 72, 111, 190n. 70; class and, 68; education in yeshivas, 68, 71, 110; reinvention of traditions, 68. See also Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness; Haskalah

Maurer, Trude, 19

Meinecke, Friedrich, 35, 70, 178n. 58

Mendele Moykher-Sforim, 68

Mendelssohn, Moses, 56, 60, 62, 63, 67, 111, 163, 167, 187n. 30

Metz, Josefa, 109; “Sünde: Aus dem Leben eines kleinen Mädchens,” 109

Migration. See Immigration of East European Jews to Germany

Milgroym, 161

Military: Jews in German, 80, 142. See also Masculinity

Mi-mizraḥ u-ma177n. 46

Minority identity. See Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness; Pluralism, cultural

Modernization, 188n. 40. See also Western/enlightened model of Judaism

Morgenstern, Lina, 112, 114, 115, 116, 117, 120, 122 (fig. 14), 202n. 40

Mosse, George, 63, 188n. 45, 189n. 55, 212n. 27, 213n. 37

Mosse publishing house, 80

Motzkin, Leo, 28, 36, 82

Mült és jövó, 183n. 109

Mundlak, Rachel, 118

Music, 16, 122, 127–31; collectors, 45; concert and opera attendance of Jewish women, 102, 128, 208n. 102; folk songs, 45, 120, 123 (fig. 16); Ost und West’s Liederabende, 102, 200n. 19; proto–Jazz Singer motif, 130, 152, 204n. 60; recorded, 200n. 19

“Muskeljudentum.” See Masculinity; Nordau, Max

Nachmärz period, 81

Nadel, Arno, 16, 45

National Socialism (Nazism), 18, 142

Nationalism, 35, 40, 74, 168; comparative European, 35, 179n. 70; conservative versus liberal, 37, 167; state versus cultural, 35, 40. See also Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness

Naturalism, 87, 88, 89, 192n. 6, 196n. 51, 206n. 90

Neue Jüdische Monatshefte, 47, 96

Newspapers. See Journals, magazines, and newspapers

Nietzsche, Friedrich Wilhelm, 130

Nonbelievers. See Conversion to Christianity

Nordau, Max, 38, 39, 64, 145, 149, 180n. 74

Nossig, Alfred, 39

Opera. See Music

Orient, Der, 31–32

Oriental Jews, 47, 112, 120, 121 (fig. 13), 182n. 104, 182n. 106

Orthodox Jewry and religious observance (also Neo-Orthodoxy), 33, 55, 56, 57, 60, 86, 212n. 20; in art, 42; in the fiction of Ost und West, 120, 125, 126, 127, 153, 156; military and, 143; Mizrachi Zionism and, 58, 144; negative stereotypes of, 125, 133, 207n. 93; Ost und West and, 186n. 14; Winz and, 185n. 12; World War I and, 211n. 17, 212n. 19

Ost und West: advertising in, 44–45, 102, 201n. 24; Alliance Israélite Universelle and, 45–47; and androcentricism, 137, 210n. 126; and antifeminism and misogyny, 108, 115, 120, 137; Austro-Hungary and, 30; circulation and popularity of, 16, 50, 96, 172n. 6, 184n. 124, 192n. 5; cover art, 41–42, 43 (fig. 2), 112; East European Jewish authors/artists in, 40–41; editorial disclaimers in, 133; “family journals” (Familienblätter) and, 31, 96, 103, 187n. 38; financial profile of, 95–96, 173n. 17; history of, 25, 31, 140, 134; literary contest in, 90, 91, 111, 125, 197n. 56; masthead iconography of, 42, 43 (fig. 3); multivalence (polysemy) and, 42, 48, 51, 75, 91, 117–18, 124–25, 131, 207nn. 90, 91; Orientalism and, 17, 106, 183n. 114, 184n. 122, 194n. 30; privileging of nonpartisanship in, 31, 32, 33, 40, 91, 96; seasonal trends, 204n. 59; subscriptions to, 103, 115, 201n. 28; subtitle(s) of, 47, 54, 69, 172n. 6, 201n. 22; title of, 172n. 5; See also Genres; Judenzählung; Music, Ost und West’s Liederabende; Philanthropy. See also specific authors and their works

Ostjuden: as term along with Westjuden, 15, 60, 163, 172n. 5. See also East European Jews

Ostjüdische Antlitz, Das (A. Zweig, Struck), 216n. 80

Palestine, 33. See also Zionism and Zionist organization

Pan-Jewishness. See Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness

Pappenheim, Bertha, 107

Parvenu stereotype, 52, 78, 79, 83, 84–97, 99, 110, 137, 141, 150, 153, 157, 162, 164, 192n. 2, 194n. 30, 195n. 39, 195n. 43, 197n. 62, 204n. 63; and parvenue stereotype, 100, 135–38

Peretz, Isaac Leib, 16, 45, 74, 87

Periodicals. See Journals, magazines, and newspapers

Perles, Felix, 45

Perles, Rosalie, 115, 116, 117

Philanthropy, 45, 52–53, 99, 101, 104–6, 117, 133, 140, 202n. 38; as paternalism, 74, 117, 202n. 43; as positive force (or empathy) toward East European Jews, 19, 22, 106, 173n. 16, 198n. 70. See also East European Jews; Female readers; Immigration of East European Jews to Germany

Phillipson, Ludwig, 31

Phönix Verlag, 108

Pilichowski, Leopold, 40, 118

Pimonenko, Nicolai, 108; “Baptized Jewess in Her [Home] Village,” 108

Pinsker, Leon, 36

Pinski, David, 45

Pluralism, cultural (multiculturalism), 15, 18, 28, 29, 36, 37, 50, 73, 143, 156, 159, 166, 167, 168–69, 189n. 56; accusations of separatism and, 66, 167–68; East-West Jewish symbiosis or biculturalism, 28, 40, 67, 73, 82, 84; Kulturkampf and, 37, 167; myths of cultural homogeneity, 38; within the Jewish community, 145. See also Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness

Pogroms, 21, 135 (fig. 20), 134, 136 (fig. 21), 150, 158, 166, 209n. 115, 213n. 36; in Germany, 158, 160; Kishinev pogrom, 39, 95, 198n. 69, 213n. 36; Scheunenviertel, 158, 160, 218n. 29

Poland, Jewish life in, 163. See also East European Jews

Poles, 167; depiction in fiction of, 156

Prague, 73

Press, Jewish. See Journals, magazines, and newspapers

Professional structure of Jews, 34, 67, 79–80, 140, 190n. 66. See also Antisemitism; Female readers; Immigration of East European Jews to Germany; Male readers

Prostitution and the white slave trade, 107, 203n. 45

Prussia: higher education in, 26

Public sphere (Jewish), 15, 18, 20, 30, 31, 51; versus private sphere, 140, 200n. 10. See also Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness; Female readers; Male readers

Publishing houses. See names of specific publishers

Raabe, Wilhelm, 87

Rathenau, Walther, 160

Readers (Readership): of Ost und West 44, 50, 79, 138, 139; process of reading, 110. See also Female readers; Intellectual readers; Male readers; Marketing and audience

Reading societies (Lesegesellschaften), 30

Reception theory, 16, 41, 50. See also Marketing and audience

Redlich, Heinrich, 112, 114, 115, 116, 123

Reform Judaism. See Liberal Judaism

Respectability, 41, 62, 63–66, 81, 83, 124, 126 (fig. 17), 188n. 45, 189n. 55; and military service, 143

Revue des deux mondes, 74

Riesser, Gabriel, 74, 111

Rimon, 161

Roskies, David, 166, 198n. 69

Rozenblit, Marsha, 34, 188n. 40

Rumania, 22, 60. See also East European Jews

Rürup, Reinhard, 169

Russia: Germany and, 23, 40; Jews in, 22, 165; numerus clausus at universities, 26, 175n. 11; opposition to Tsarist regime, 27, 28, 35, 214n. 52; Pale of Settlement defined, 175n. 26. See also East European Jews; Immigration of East European Jews to Germany; Pogroms

Russischer jüdischer wissenschaftlicher Verein, 28, 30, 32, 79, 176n. 28, 176n. 29, 176n. 39

Sacher-Masoch, Leopold, 87

Salomon, Alice, 202n. 40

Salter, Siegbert, 92, 93, 109, 197n. 62; “Szene aus Berlin W. Die Tempelfahrt,” 92–93, 109; “Das Glück des Hauses Löbenthal Skizze aus Berlin W.,” 92–94

Sartre, Jean-Paul, 165, 177n. 49

Schach, Fabius, 107, 110, 111, 112, 116, 197n. 57, 204n. 63, 204n. 55; “Zur Psychologie des Renegatentums,” 110–12

Schatz, Boris, 40

Scheunenviertel pogrom. See Pogroms

Schiller, Friedrich, 103

Schlegel, Dorothea, 100

Schlemiel, Der, 16, 180n. 74, 198n. 65

Schnitzler, Arthur, 129; Der Weg ins Freie, 129

Scholem, Gershom (Gerhard), 47, 72, 124, 165, 218n. 33

Schopenhauer, Arthur, 127

Secularization. See Western/enlightened model of Judaism

Segel, Binjamin, 16, 29, 38, 45, 72, 105, 108, 116, 132–37, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 156, 158, 162, 163, 165, 165–67, 168, 186n. 14, 199n. 9, 209n. 115, 213n. 39, 214n. 50, 215n. 56, 216n. 75; Am Tage des Gerichts, 140, 151–58, 215n. 68, 216n. 77; “Die Einweihung des Tempels,” 216. n73; “Erziehung zum Haß,” 148; “Genug der Versäumnisse. Ein Ruf zur Tat,” 134; “Das Judenelend in Galizien,” 132, 133; “Der Krieg als Lehrmeister,” 145–51; “Die Lehrerin,” 135–37, 210n. 123; “Philosophie der Zerstreuung,” 105; “Philosophie des Pogroms,” 166–67; Die polnische Judenfrage, 152; “Der stille Pogrom. Wehruf eines russischen Juden,” 134

Self-determination, 169

Self-hatred, 19, 23, 34, 95, 124, 126, 138, 162, 164, 197n. 57; as hatred, 138, 140; as stereotype, 18, 95, 107, 137, 140, 146–50, 164, 214n. 55. See also Parvenu stereotype

Sephardic Jews, 62, 182n. 106, 187n. 34, 187n. 35

Sessa, Karl A. B., 194n. 36, 207n. 94

Simmel, Georg, 29

Simplicissimus, 91, 108, 141

Snowman, Isaak, 131; “Sardanopolis,” 131 (fig. 19)

Social Democrats, 167

Social work and welfare. See Female readers

Socialism (Jewish), 27, 28, 29, 82, 178n. 62, 189n. 57, 193n. 13; Po’alei Tsiyyon, 30

Sokolow, Nahum, 31

Soldiers. See Masculinity

Sonderweg thesis, 167

Spinoza, Baruch, 130

Steinschneider, Moritz, 30

Steinthal, Chaim, 29, 156

Stereotyping, 38, 49, 51, 52, 77–78, 79, 96, 99–100, 108, 125, 159, 162, 163, 167, 169–70; the belle juive, 108, 204n. 58; as technique or rhetorically self-aware process, 19, 20, 30, 48–50, 52–53, 77, 147, 150, 162, 184n. 123; changing trends of in Ost und West, 52, 140, 157, 184n. 121; discourse and, 174n. 20; formation of, 17, 19, 48–49, 147, 183n. 117, 192n. 1; “hate speech” and, 165, 217n. 23; in institutional context, 19, 20, 50; negative versus positive, 17, 48, 74, 75, 99–100, 108, 164; of antisemite as foil, 140, 155; of Jews as left-wing or radical, 26, 160; revisions, reversals, and reinventions of, 17, 18, 47, 48, 52, 82, 86, 87, 94, 95, 111, 135, 136–37, 146, 148, 156, 159; traditional stereotype of Westerners (daytshe), 59, 66, 86, 173n. 11, 173n. 16, 186n. 20. See also East European Jews; Parvenu stereotype; Self-hatred

Stock Market Crash of 1873 (Börsenkrach), 67, 79

Stoecker, Adolf, 37, 193n. 16

Strack, Hermann, 29

Struck, Hermann, 41, 197n. 57, 216n. 80

Student fraternities (Burschenschaften): compared to East European Jewish student organizations, 28. See also Russischer jüdischer wissenschaftlicher Verein

Süßkind of Trimberg, 166, 218n. 28

Switzerland, 26

Syndram, Karl Ulrich, 73, 74

Talmud, 51, 57, 100, 112, 176n. 27, 199n. 9

Tietz family, 198n. 70

Toynbee Halls, 107

Translations, 45, 74; quality of, 47

Treitschke, Heinrich von, 86, 87

Trietsch, Davis, 17

Trotsky, Leon, 29

Trotzjuden. See Conversion to Christianity

Ullstein publishing company, 44, 80, 118, 181n. 98

Unification of 1871, German: Jews and, 24, 37, 66

United States, Jews in the, 179n. 67, 217n. 9

Ury, Lesser, 40, 41, 197n. 57

Ussishkin, Menachem, 36

Välkerpsychologie (“ethnic psychology”), 156

Varnhagen, Rahel, 100

Vienna, 28, 29, 71, 107, 118; epidemic of baptisms in (Taufseuche), 108, 204n. 57; in “Rafael Gutmann,” 206n. 82

Vilna, 212n. 20

Voskhod, 31, 44

Wagner, Richard, 103, 107, 120, 130, 207n. 92; “Das Judenthum in der Musik,” 130; Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg, 120; Tristan und Isolde, 120, 128, 129, 130, 208nn. 100, 102

Wälsungenblut (Mann), 92, 94, 197n64

Wassermann, Henry, 165

Weimar period: Jews in Germany during the, 159–62, 190n. 65

Weiner, Marc, 208n. 100

Weininger, Otto, 126–27, 128, 130, 132; Geschlecht und Charakter, 130; review of in Ost und West, 208n. 87

Weizmann, Chaim, 27, 28, 36, 39, 82, 165, 175

Welt, Die, 31, 39, 180n. 78

Wertheimer, Jack, 19, 20, 173n. 18

Western/enlightened model of Judaism (secularization), 34, 44, 55, 56, 59–67, 75, 76, 88, 90–92, 144–45, 154, 162

Western Jewry (Westjuden): as stereotype, 17, 141; as writers, 87; See also Baaalei teshuvah; East European Jews; German Jewry; Parvenu stereotype; Philanthropy; Western/enlightened model of Judaism

Westernization. See Western/enlightened model of Judaism

Wilde, Oscar, 130

Winz, Leo, 16, 25, 26, 28, 29, 32 (fig. 1), 39, 45, 48, 57, 68, 82, 84, 95–96, 110, 133, 146, 150, 158, 162, 165, 169, 177n. 41, 177n. 42, 181n. 98, 182n. 101, 182n. 102, 185n. 1, 200n. 20, 213n. 32, 214n. 41; boxing promotion and, 16; Herzl and, 38; wife Elsa Jacoby and, 102–3, 203n. 49

Wissenschaft des Judentums, 145, 147, 150, 167, 191n. 78

Women, Jewish. See Female readers and specific entries

World War I, 140, 142, 146; calls for Burgfrieden and, 146; demands for German-Jewish conformity, 141, 142, 143; Ost und West and, 140. See also Masculinity, in the military (Tauglichkeit)

Yekke stereotype, 141

Yiddish language, Yiddishists, and Yiddishism, 27, 28, 56, 60, 68, 69, 73, 101, 107, 115, 116, 120, 197n. 57, 202n. 32, 206n. 87, 207n. 94, 210n. 123; Mauscheln stereotype, 125, 130, 135, 136, 207n. 94

Yom Kippur, 92, 109, 152, 153, 154, 156, 188n. 52, 204n. 59, 215n. 58, 216n. 71

York-Steiner, Heinrich, 130; “Koriander, der Chasan,” 130

Young Jewish Movement (Jungjüdische Bewegung), 79, 144

Youth movement, 79, 81, 83; Wandervägel, 83

Zangwill, Israel, 150, 178n. 59, 214n. 54

Zepler, Bogumil, 123 (fig. 15).

Zionism and Zionist organization (Zionist movement), 17, 29, 33, 35, 36, 37, 69, 81, 87, 105, 177n. 55, 209n. 114; Alliance Israélite Universelle and, 47; as displaced religion, 188n. 52; Congresses, 31, 36; cultural Zionism, 39; discourse of racialism, 38, 179n. 70; during World War I, 145, 146; Gegenwartsarbeit, 37; Gemeinde elections and, 37, 81; historiography and, 165; Jewish Liberalism and, 145; political versus cultural (Kulturzionismus), 35, 38, 190n. 73; practical Zionism, 37; Territorialism (the ITO) and, 35, 178n. 59, 214n. 54; Uganda controvery, 38. See also Altneuland controversy; Democratic Faction (Demokratische Fraktion) of Zionist Organization; Ethnic Judaism/Jewishness; Herzl

Zlocisti, Theodor, 16, 45, 202n. 32

Zweig, Arnold, 216n. 80

Zweig, Stefan, 207n. 90, 212n. 31

Additional Information

ISBN
9780814345184
Related ISBN
9780814345191
MARC Record
OCLC
1036698764
Pages
235-246
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-08
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC
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