publisher colophon

VIENNA

153. Seal of Lublin

Dimensions: unknown.

Location: seal off.

Bibliography: Aronius, 1902, No. 627.

A document in Latin dated February 18, 1257, focuses on a dispute of two Jewish brothers, Lublin and Nickel, who held the official positions of Counts of the Treasury* under Duke Ottaker II, with Bishop Konrad of Freising. It would appear to be the earliest known document from central Europe sealed by a Jew and thus warrants a concise review.

The subject is an argument between the Jews and the bishop over sixteen pieces of property in Urleugstorf, a dispute which was resolved by means of a compromise mediated by Otto von Meifsau. It was agreed that the Jewish brothers would lose all claims if they did not pay the bishop or his authorized representatives two hundred Viennese silver marks before the next festival of the Apostle Jacob (July 25). If they did pay, then they would have the usufruct of the properties. At the same time the bishop agreed to be their guarantor in relation to Rudolf von Polendorf, his wife, and their heirs, involving a sum of money which Rudolf had lent another party on the credit of these properties. The sum the bishop agreed to guarantee consisted of fourteen gold marks and silver utensils valued at another eighty marks and fifty pounds of Regensburg groschen. The document is still extant and a reproduction is shown here; unfortunately, the seal of Lublin has fallen off. The document is located in the files of the House, Court and State Archives of Austria at Vienna.

Compromise settlement on property from Vienna, February 18, 1257, originally sealed by Lublin. House, Court and State Archives at Vienna.

One might assume that Counts of the Treasury, despite their religion, would automatically be regarded as noblemen even though there is no record of a specific act of ennoblement. We do know that Lublin and Nickel were hated by the Christian aristocracy in Austria. Ottaker II, however, ignored this hostility and was considered a friend of the Jews (see Grunwald, 1936, ch. 1). Lublin and Nickel, with Schlom and Teka, the two earlier distinguished Jews, dominated the financial administrations of the Austrian dukes during the latter part of the twelfth as well as the thirteenth century. The two brothers were Hungarian by origin and are discussed at greater length in the analysis of Hungarian seals later in this book.


*The document begins in Latin, “I Lublin and my brother Nickel, Jews, counts of the chamber [treasury] of the illustrious Austrian dukes,” so that there can be no question as to their rank. The Latin also states “our seal,” which seems to indicate that though the records refer to the seal as belonging to Lublin, the brothers shared the use of the same seal.

*The document begins in Latin, “I Lublin and my brother Nickel, Jews, counts of the chamber [treasury] of the illustrious Austrian dukes,” so that there can be no question as to their rank. The Latin also states “our seal,” which seems to indicate that though the records refer to the seal as belonging to Lublin, the brothers shared the use of the same seal.

Previous Chapter

Austria

Additional Information

ISBN
9780814344859
MARC Record
OCLC
1055142843
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-02
Open Access
Yes
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC-SA
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.