publisher colophon

136. Seal of Vyvelin

Dimensions: unknown.

Location: unknown.

Bibliography: Ruebel, 1881–1910, vol. 2, Nos. 966, 988.

Ruebel’s transcript of documents from Dortmund specifically notes that a Jew from that city named Vyvelin* had a seal, now unfortunately lost. Our information comes from two notations.

The first is dated January 28, 1397. The Jewess Pesselyn, widow of the Jew Copman (Kaufmann), gives a receipt to the city of Dortmund for 200 Rhine gulden as a partial repayment of the 581 Rhine gulden owed her by the city. Witnesses are Thideman Sederle, a Christian, and Vyvelin the Jew, who affix their seals. The original document at the City Archives was listed as No. 1227. The seal of Thideman Sederle is reported to be a housemark, that is, an accepted sign rather than a true seal; that of Vyvelin showed a Jew’s hat “with an indistinct Hebrew legend.” Both seals were lost after World War II. It may be presumed that Vyvelin sealed for the widow of Kaufmann because she did not have a seal.

The second mention of this seal is dated December 4, 1397. Vyvelin the Jew gives a receipt to the city acknowledging repayment on a debt incurred of 250 Rhine gulden in accordance with a letter dated September 13, 1392, and now repaid in full with interest. The original document at the City Archives, listed as No. 1232, was sealed by Vyvelin. This document was also lost following World War II. The Dortmund archives have suffered horribly over the centuries. Almost all the documents referred to in Ruebel’s Dortmunder Urkundenbuch from before 1300 are copies, indicating an earlier catastrophe; the later ones were victims of World War II. From the description offered in the notes regarding Vyvelin’s seal, it is apparent that it was a conventional one for the period showing a Jew’s hat with a circular legend in Hebrew, undoubtedly giving the name of Vyvelin and his father.


*Not Vivelin the Red from Strasbourg (No. 113), who was active a half century earlier.

According to Dr. Reimann, Chief Archivist of Dortmund, during World War II the city documents were placed in a cloister for safety. After Germany’s defeat the cloister was converted into a camp for deportees from eastern Europe. To express their rage against their former oppressors, the camp inmates broke into the document boxes and destroyed their contents.

*Not Vivelin the Red from Strasbourg (No. 113), who was active a half century earlier.

According to Dr. Reimann, Chief Archivist of Dortmund, during World War II the city documents were placed in a cloister for safety. After Germany’s defeat the cloister was converted into a camp for deportees from eastern Europe. To express their rage against their former oppressors, the camp inmates broke into the document boxes and destroyed their contents.

Ruebel’s transcript of documents from Dortmund specifically notes that a Jew from that city named Vyvelin* had a seal, now unfortunately lost. Our information comes from two notations.

The second mention of this seal is dated December 4, 1397. Vyvelin the Jew gives a receipt to the city acknowledging repayment on a debt incurred of 250 Rhine gulden in accordance with a letter dated September 13, 1392, and now repaid in full with interest. The original document at the City Archives, listed as No. 1232, was sealed by Vyvelin. This document was also lost following World War II. The Dortmund archives have suffered horribly over the centuries. Almost all the documents referred to in Ruebel’s Dortmunder Urkundenbuch from before 1300 are copies, indicating an earlier catastrophe; the later ones were victims of World War II. From the description offered in the notes regarding Vyvelin’s seal, it is apparent that it was a conventional one for the period showing a Jew’s hat with a circular legend in Hebrew, undoubtedly giving the name of Vyvelin and his father.

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780814344859
MARC Record
OCLC
1055142843
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-02
Open Access
Yes
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC-SA
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