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231 Abbreviations Used in the Notes AW Aubrey Williams Papers, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York CCNY Cohen Library, City College of New York Archives CT Charles Taussig Papers, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York DP Democratic Party, Women’s Division Papers, National Committee Papers, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York ER Eleanor Roosevelt Papers, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York ERPC Eleanor Roosevelt Pamphlet Collection, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York JM Jack McMichael Papers, Tamiment Library, New York University JPL Joseph P. Lash Papers, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York JW James Wechsler Papers, University Archives/Columbiana Library, Columbia University PC Tamiment Library Pamphlet Collection, New York University POF President’s Official File, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York Notes 232 Notes to pages 2–9 PPF President’s Personal File, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York RH Reed Harris Papers, University Archives/Columbiana Library, Columbia University YPSL Young People’s Socialist League Papers, Tamiment Library, New York University Introduction 1. Paula Fass, The Damned and the Beautiful: American Youth in the 1920s (New York: Oxford University Press, 1977), 346. 2. Ibid., 329. 3. The National Student Federation of America was established in 1925, marking a significant moment when a small subset of youth came together. The New Student, published by the National Student Forum, even hoped to spark a genuine youth movement; however, even a strong conviction to be informed and involved in larger matters quickly evaporated, Fass argues, as “the New Student ’s political push quickly relapsed into the fashionable emphasis on cultural philistinism and the issue of freedom of expression.” Fass, The Damned and the Beautiful, 337. 4. Joseph Lash, “Two Lives” (Unpublished Autobiography, Chapter 3), 11, JPL Box 78. 5. Ibid.; James Wechsler, Revolt on the Campus (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1973). Paula Fass talks about an “ethos of hostility toward the faculty” in the 1920s, which helped college students make the campus their own, which plays a part in the youth of the 1930s operating outside parameters controlled by adults. Fass, The Beautiful and the Damned, 180. 6. See Fass, The Damned and the Beautiful, Chapter 8. In the 1920s, activism tended to be reactive whereas in the 1930s it started out as reactive and quickly transformed into proactive efforts to shape future policies and the larger social, political, and economic systems. 7. Beverly Beyette, “NOW Chief Molly Yard Was ‘Born a Feminist,’”Los Angeles Times, July 21, 1987, http://articles.latimes.com/1987-07-21/news/ vw-5159_1_molly-yard. 8. See Lash, “Two Lives” (Unpublished Autobiography, “A Trip to Europe”), 26, JPL Box 78 9. Richard Pells, Radical Visions and American Dreams: Culture and Social Thought in the Depression Years (New York: Harper & Row, 1973), 131. 10. Lash, “Two Lives” (Unpublished Autobiography), JPL Box 78. 11. William Hinckley to Gardiner Jackson, February 13, 1937, Gardner Jackson Papers, Box 5; at a National Council meeting on January 16, 1936, 12 of 14 attendees were based in New York. Only Waldo McNutt and Molly Yard were not. National Council Meeting Minutes, January 15, 1936, JPL, Box 29. Notes to pages 9–24 233 12. Report of the 6th American Youth Congress, JPL, Box 23. 13. Joseph Lash to FDR, July 2, 1936, POF 58. 14. Robert Cohen, When the Old Left Was Young: Student Radicals and America ’s First Mass Student Movement, 1929–1941 (New York: Oxford University Press, 1993), xviii. 1.The Effects of the Crash:The Youth Problem from New York City to Harlan County, Kentucky, and Back Again 1. April 4, 1935, POF 58. 2. James Wechsler, Revolt on the Campus (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1935), 101. 3. Hal Draper, “The Student Movement of the Thirties: A Political History,” As We Saw the Thirties: Essays on Social and Political Movements of a Decade (Chicago : University of Illinois Press, 1967), 166; Wechsler, Revolt on the Campus, 91–108; Michael Henry Miller, “The American Student Movement,” 1931– 1941: A Historical Analysis” (PhD diss., Florida State University, 1981), 28–30. Significantly, Miller points out that the 80 students who participated in the trip “claimed to be communists.” Miller, “The American Student Movement,” 95–96. 4. The expulsion, protests, and ultimate outcome of this incident is fully discussed in Chapter 2. 5. Wechsler, Revolt on the Campus, 99. 6. Rob F. Hall, “Kentucky Makes Radicals,” Student Review, May 1932, JPL Box 29. 7. Ibid. 8. See, for example...


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