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NOTES Introduction 1. A. T. Smythe to J. A. Adger, 2 June 1864, Augustine Thomas Smythe Papers, 1209.03.02.04, South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, South Carolina. 2. Some confusing variations of surname spellings mark Smythe’s paternal genealogy for several generations. Thomas Smyth was the son of Samuel Smith, who had inexplicably changed the spelling of his name from Smyth to Smith. Thomas changed the spelling of the family name back to Smyth, to avoid being confused with another man by the same name, and eventually his son Augustine added an “e” to the name for the same reason. Augustine’s father, Thomas Smyth, left a valuable record of his life and times in a book published many years after his death as Autobiographical Notes, Letters and Reflections. His granddaughter, Louisa Cheves Smythe Stoney, arranged and annotated “three bulky volumes” Smyth had compiled, she surmised, “with the evident intention of some day writing the full story of his eventful and unusual life.” Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, Prefatory Note, 8, 14, 509. 3. Ibid., 8, 14–15, 18, 28, 39–40. 4. Ibid., 40, 59–62, 65, 76–78. 5. Ibid., 55, 65–66, 78. 6. Ibid., 79–81. 7. Ibid., 212; O’Brien, Conjectures of Order, 65. 8. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 65, 68. 9. Ibid., 509. 10. Martin, The Mind of Frederick Douglass, 43; Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 374. 11. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 65, 68. 12. Foner, Life and Writings of Frederick Douglass, 1:181. 13. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 194. 14. Adger, My Life and Times, 165–67. 15. Ibid., 170–73. 16. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 195. 17. Adger, My Life and Times, 174–75. 18. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 733. 19. Ibid., 736–37. 20. Journal of the Proceedings of the Seventieth Annual Convention, 30–35. 21. Adger, My Life and Times, 162–63. 22. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 238. 23. Ibid., 244. 24. Stephens, Science, Race, and Religion in the American South, 170–73. 152 | Notes to Pages 12–22 25. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 554. 26. Smyth, The Sin and the Curse, 13. 27. Ibid., 8. 28. Adger, My Life and Times, 179–80. 29. Farmer, The Metaphysical Confederacy, viii. 30. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 563. 31. Ibid., 565. 32. Ibid., 575. 33. Vile, Encyclopedia of Constitutional Amendments, 118. 34. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 737. 35. Ibid., 675. 36. Ibid., 684. 37. In Memoriam: Rev. Thomas Smyth, D.D., 9. 38. Smyth, Autobiographical Notes, 716. 39. In Memoriam: Rev. Thomas Smyth, D.D., 3–24. 40. Hagy, ed., On the Eve of the Civil War, 151; Bailey, Biographical Directory of the South Carolina Senate, 1523; J. Adger Smyth to Gus Smythe, 23 December 1860, South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, South Carolina (hereafter SCHS). 41. “Excerpts from the Wartime Correspondence of Augustine T. Smythe,” South Carolina Historical Magazine, 27. 42. Ibid; A. T. Smythe to M. M. Smyth, June 1862, SCHS; A. T. Smythe to J. A. Adger, 17 June 1862, SCHS. 43. A. T. Smythe to J. A. Adger, 5 February 1863, SCHS; Orvin, In South Carolina Waters, 113–16. 44. “Excerpts from the Wartime Correspondence of Augustine T. Smythe,” South Carolina Historical Magazine, 27. 45. Snowden, History of South Carolina, 833. 46. Ibid., 840–41. 47. Ibid., 842–44. 48. Ibid., 845. 49. “The Signal Corps in the Confederate States Army,” 104. 50. Ibid. 51. Ibid., 105. 52. A. T. Smythe to J. A. Adger, 23 April 1863, SCHS. 53. “The Signal Corps in the Confederate States Army,” 105. 54. A. T. Smythe to M. M. Smyth, 19 December 1864, SCHS. 55. Major General Samuel Jones, the Confederate departmental commander at Charleston, later wrote that “Charleston was General Gillmore’s objective point, which he proposed to gain by way of Morris Island. . . . For the complete success of his plan it was exceedingly important that he should, with the least possible delay, demolish Fort Sumter and silence Fort Moultrie and other batteries on the west of Sullivan ’s Island, the accomplishment of which formed a part of his plan, and thus open the gate to Charleston for the entrance of the fleet before his adversary could prepare other works to bar his approach to the city.” Jones, The Siege of Charleston, 249. Notes to Pages 22–25 | 153 56. The Confederate engineer John Johnson also described Gillmore’s strategy in the summer of 1863: “The Union commander decided to make [Folly Island] his base, and concentrated here a force of ten thousand infantry, 350 artillery, and six hundred engineer troops, forming a...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781611177718
Related ISBN
9781611177701
MARC Record
OCLC
965754175
Pages
200
Launched on MUSE
2017-06-17
Language
English
Open Access
No
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