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strategic asia 2013–14 indicators table of contents Politics Table 1: Political leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Table 2: Political rights, corruption, and democracy . . . . . . . . . . 305 Economics Table 3: Gross domestic product . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Table 4: GDP growth and inflation rates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Trade and Investment Table 5: Trade flow and trade partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 Table 6: Flow of foreign direct investment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Energy and the Environment Table 7: Primary energy consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Table 8: Primary energy consumption by fuel type . . . . . . . . . . . 311 Security Challenges Table 9: Armed forces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Table 10: Total defense expenditures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313 Nuclear Arms and Nonproliferation Figure 1: Nuclear warhead stockpiles by country and year . . . . . . . 314 Figure 2: Nuclear weapons–capable platforms and delivery systems by country . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Table 11: Nonproliferation treaties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 Table 12: WMD-export control regimes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 Indicators Strategic Asia by the Numbers The strategic dynamics of the Asia-Pacific have evolved significantly in the past year as the global geopolitical center of gravity continues to shift eastward. China’s rise still generates concern among neighboring states despite a growing level of regional economic integration. As the United States “rebalances to Asia,” a dual regional structure is emerging whereby many Asian nations are increasingly dependent on China economically yet continue to rely on the United States for the maintenance of regional security. In the second year of the U.S. rebalance, the focus of the strategy has shifted to place greater emphasis on economic and political engagement. Diplomatic and trade initiatives, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership, have received greater attention, building on the military aspects of the rebalance announced in its first year. The Asia-Pacific continues to be plagued by several long-term sources of tension, most notably on the Korean Peninsula. Early on in her administration, new South Korean president Park Geun-hye was confronted by North Korean provocations, including nuclear threats. Despite President Park’s attempts to recast inter-Korean relations through a policy of trustpolitik—aimed at strengthening deterrence while renewing dialogue with the North—progress has been stymied by Pyongyang’s belligerence. Disputes over territorial and historical issues also intensified in 2012 and early 2013, resulting in several armed confrontations. These clashes highlighted the persistent and growing distrust and antagonism among many of Asia’s leading powers and may be emblematic of the rising influence of nationalism within the region. The following pages contain tables and figures drawn from a broad array of sources. These charts cover politics, economics, trade and investment, energy and the environment, security challenges, and nuclear arms and nonproliferation. The data sets summarize the critical trends in Asia and changes underway in the regional balance of power. The information for “Strategic Asia by the Numbers” was compiled by NBR interns Zane Buckey, Charlie Chung, Miriam D’Onofrio, Christopher Martin, Kuni Shimoji, and Taylor Washburn. 304 • Strategic Asia 2013–14 Politics Late 2012 and early 2013 saw change as well as continuity in the political dynamics of the Asia-Pacific. Discouragingly, a growing strategic distrust has come to characterize many of the bilateral relationships between Asia’s most prominent powers over the past year. • U.S. president Barack Obama hosted visits with leaders from Japan, the Philippines, Afghanistan, Singapore, South Korea, Myanmar, Vietnam, and Brunei in Washington, D.C., and met with Chinese president Xi Jinping in California. In November 2012, Obama took his fifth trip to the Asia-Pacific as president, visiting Bangkok and Rangoon before attending the East Asia Summit in Phnom Penh. • A number of political transitions took place in the Asia-Pacific in 2012–13. U.S. president Barack Obama was elected to a second term, as was Taiwan president Ma Ying-jeou. In China, South Korea, Japan, Pakistan, Russia, and Iran, new leaders assumed power. • In Myanmar the military has continued to relinquish political control, creating a platform for improved relations with the United States and the international community. t a b l e 1 Political leadership Head of state Head of government Australia Queen Elizabeth II Prime Minister Kevin Rudd China President Xi Jinping Premier Li Keqiang India President Pranab Mukherjee Prime Minister Manmohan Singh Indonesia President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono Iran Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei President Hassan Rouhani Japan Emperor Akihito Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Myanmar President Thein Sein North Korea Eternal President Kim Il-sung (deceased) First Chairman Kim Jong-un Pakistan President Mamnoon Hussain Prime Minister Mohammed Nawaz Sharif Russia President Vladimir Putin Premier Dmitri Medvedev South Korea President Park Geun-hye Prime Minister Chung Hong-won Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou Premier Jiang...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781939131294
Related ISBN
9781939131287
MARC Record
OCLC
1019668414
Pages
334
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-18
Language
English
Open Access
No
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