publisher colophon

Notes

Preface

1. Jeffrey Schnapp, Twitter post, January 16, 2013, 8:08 p.m., https://twitter.com/jaytiesse

2. Mark Sample, Twitter post, January 18, 2013, 6.15 a.m., https://twitter.com/samplereality

3. Ted Underwood, Twitter post, January 18, 2013, 7:41 p.m., http://twitter.com/Ted_Underwood/

4. Cecire, “Introduction.”

5. Liminal here describes a disciplinary and spatial position rather than a temporal stage.

6. Whitney Trettien to Humanist Mailing List, January 6, 2013, 8:24 a.m., http://www.dhhumanist.org/cgi-bin/archive/archive_msg.cgi?file=/Humanist.vol26.txt&msgnum=648&start=90882/

7. Bethany Nowviskie, “Digital Humanities in the Anthropocene,” Bethany Nowviskie, July 10, 2014, http://nowviskie.org/2014/anthropocene/

8. Goldberg, Afterlife, sec. IV.

9. Ong, “Expanding Humanities,” 1.

10. Ekström and Sörlin, Alltings Mått, 23.

11. Goldberg, Afterlife, sec. VI.

Chapter 1

1. Eisenstein, Printing Press; Febvre and Martin, Coming of the Book, 143–47.

2. Dahlström, “Critical Editing.”

3. For a very illuminating discussion of library catalogs, see Andrew Prescott, “The Function, Structure, and Future of Catalogues,” Digital Riffs, January 11, 2013, http://digitalriffs.blogspot.se/2013/01/the-function-structure-and-future-of.html

4. Drucker, “Humanities Approaches.”

5. White, What Is Spatial History?

6. Kirschenbaum, Mechanisms, 12–13.

7. Sterne, “Example.”

8. Fitzpatrick, Planned Obsolescence, 2–5.

9. Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet), Ämnesöversikter 2010.

10. Turner, “Family of Man.”

11. See, e.g., Chittum, “NYT’s $150 Million-a-Year Paywall”; Royal, “We Need a Digital-First Curriculum.”

12. Hayles, How We Think, 2–3.

13. Lindhé, “Medieval Materiality.”

14. Svensson, “Virtual Worlds.”

15. Hockey, “History of Humanities Computing,” 16.

16. University of California Humanities Research Institute, “HASS Cyberinfrastructure.”

17. Mukerji, “Me? A Digital Humanist?”

18. Natalia Cecire, “When DH Was in Vogue; or, THATcamp Theory,” Natalia Cecire’s Blog, October 19, 2011, http://nataliacecire.blogspot.se/2011/10/when-dh-was-in-vogue-or-thatcamp-theory.html

19. Ibid.

20. See also Porsdam, Too Much “Digital,” Too Little “Humanities”?

21. Digital Humanities Conference, “<audio>Digital Humanities</audio>.”

22. Jonathan Sterne, “Audio in Digital Humanities Authorship: A Roadmap (version 0.5),” Superbon!, July 24, 2011, http://superbon.net/?p=1915

23. Cárdenas, “Is the Digital Humanities a Hot, Sellable Commodity?”

24. See, e.g., Risam, “On Disruption, Race, and the Digital Humanities.”

25. Ted Underwood, “How Everyone Gets to Claim They Do DH,” The Stone and the Shell, September 22, 2012, http://tedunderwood.com/2012/09/22/how-everyone-gets-to-claim-they-do-dh/

26. Stommel, “Public Digital Humanities.”

27. Jen Guiliano, “Why You Shouldn’t Be a Digital Humanist,” Just Another Day of DH 2013 Site, April 8, 2013, http://dayofdh2013.matrix.msu.edu/jenguiliano/2013/04/08/why-you-shouldnt-be-a-digital-humanist/

28. Goldberg, “World as Platform”; Mattern, “Library as Infrastructure.”

29. Balsamo, “Engineering Cultural Studies.”

30. Liu, “Where Is Cultural Criticism?,” 491.

31. For more examples, see, e.g., Prescott, “Consumers, Creators, or Commentators?”

32. Kirsch, “Limits of the Digital Humanities.”

33. For a useful account of digital-humanities-based critiques of Kirsch’s article, see Mark Sample, “Difficult Thinking about the Digital Humanities,” Sample Reality, May 12, 2014. http://www.samplereality.com/2014/05/12/difficult-thinking-about-the-digital-humanities/

34. Paraphrased from an e-mail conversation with David Theo Goldberg.

35. Gitelman, Paper Knowledge.

36. Infrastructure, Space, and Media, 71.

37. White, What Is Spatial History?

38. Sterne, MP3.

39. Asaro, “On Banning Autonomous Lethal Systems.”

40. “Love Machine,” Peter Asaro’s WWW, accessed November, 27, 2013, http://www.peterasaro.org/lovemachine/lovemachine.htm

41. Palm and Larsson, “Rock Carvings at Nämforsen.”

42. Roy Rosenzweig Center, “What Is Digital History?”

43. Kaci Nash, “Digital Historical Scholarship and the Civil War,” Digital History Project, January 8, 2012, http://digitalhistory.wordpress.com/2012/01/08/digital-historical-scholarship-and-the-civil-war/

44. Cameron Blevins, “The Perpetual Sunrise of Methodology,” Cameron Blevins, January 5, 2015, http://www.cameronblevins.org/posts/perpetual-sunrise-methodology/

45. Donahue, Great Meadow.

46. See, e.g., Anderson, “Quantitative History.”

47. Hayles, How We Think, 183.

48. Terras, “Digital Classicist,” 172.

49. Hayles, How We Think, 183–92.

50. Frank, “Spatial History,” 420–21.

51. Seed, “Map Is Not a Picture.”

52. Rome Reborn.

53. Dylla et al., “Rome Reborn 2.0.”

54. Drucker, “Humanities Approaches,” par. 1.

55. Betts, “Towards a Multisensory Experience.”

56. Ibid, 132.

57. Saldana and Johanson, “Procedural Modeling for Rapid-Prototyping of Multiple Building Phases.”

58. Guldi, “Time Wars.”

59. Armitage, “What’s the Big Idea?,” 507.

60. Ibid.

61. Hayles, How We Think, 27–28.

62. See, e.g., Lindgren, “Introducing Connected Concept Analysis,” 1–4.

63. Maker Lab, “About.”

64. McCarty et al., “Questioning, Asking, and Enduring Curiosity.”

65. Alliance for Networking Visual Culture.

66. Ratto, “Critical Making.”

67. Svensson, “From Optical Fiber to Conceptual Cyberinfrastructure.”

68. University of Minnesota Press, “Debates in the Digital Humanities.”

69. Kirschenbaum, “Digital Humanities.”

70. Palgrave Macmillan, “Understanding Digital Humanities.”

71. University of Chicago Press, “How We Think.”

72. Matthew Kirschenbaum, Twitter post, March 20, 2012, 3:48 p.m., http://www.twitter.com/mkirschenbaum/

Chapter 2

1. Willard McCarty to Humanist Mailing List, May 14, 1987, 8:17 p.m., http://dhhumanist.org/Archives/Virginia/v01/8705.1324.txt/

2. Alvarado, “Digital Humanities Situation.”

3. 4Humanities.

4. Julie Thompson Klein, e-mail message to author, January 31, 2013.

5. Weingart, “Short History,” 6.

6. Whitney Trettien, “So, What’s Up with MLA?,” Diapsalmata, January 25, 2013, http://blog.whitneyannetrettien.com/2013/01/so-whats-up-with-mla.html

7. Andrew Prescott, “Making the Digital Human: Anxieties, Possibilities, Challenges,” Digital Riffs, July 5, 2012, http://digitalriffs.blogspot.se/2012/07/making-digital-human-anxieties.html

8. Pannapacker, “No DH, No Interview.”

9. Ibid.

10. ACH Panel, “Humanities Computing.”

11. Klein, Crossing Boundaries, 57.

12. Busa, foreword, xvi. Attempts at tracing the history within the tradition of humanities computing include McCarty, “Humanities Computing,” 1224–35; Vanhoutte, “Gates of Hell.”

13. Eisenstein, Printing Press.

14. Julianne Nyhan, “Gender, Knowledge, and Hierarchy: On Busa’s Female Punch Card Operators,” Arche Logos, May 3, 2014, http://archelogos.hypotheses.org/135

15. Jones, “Network Inside Out.”

16. Svensson, “Humanities Computing.”

17. Functional words, generic adjectives, and “humanities” were removed from the frequency list.

18. Svensson, “Humanities Computing.”

19. Deegan, “Report,” 1.

20. Vanhoutte, Editor’s Report, 3.

21. Literary and Linguistic Computing, http://llc.oxfordjournals.org/

22. Svensson, “Landscape of Digital Humanities.”

23. Stephen Ramsay, “DH Types One and Two,” Stephen Ramsay’s Blog, May 3, 2013, http://stephenramsay.us/2013/05/03/dh-one-and-two/

24. ADHO, “About.”

25. “About page,” http://hastac.org/about, accessed January 15, 2013.

26. J. Rice, “A HASTAC Revolution?,” Yellow Dog, October 18, 2010, http://ydog.net/?p=792/

27. See Andrew Prescott, “Small Worlds and Big Tents,” Digital Riffs, May 5, 2013, http://digitalriffs.blogspot.se/2013/05/small-worlds-and-big-tents.html

28. David Golumbia, “‘Digital Humanities’: Two Definitions,” Uncomputing, January 20, 2013, http://www.uncomputing.org/?p=203

29. Stephen Ramsay, comment on Golumbia, “‘Digital Humanities’: Two Definitions.”

30. Ibid.

31. Alex Reid, comment on Golumbia, “‘Digital Humanities’: Two Definitions.”

32. Hayles, How We Think, 26–27.

33. Ibid., 27.

34. Burdick et al., Digital_Humanities, 122.

35. Ibid.

36. Ibid.

37. McPherson, “Introduction.”

38. Davidson, “Humanities 2.0,” 711–12.

39. Ibid., 715.

40. Ramsay, “DH Types One and Two.”

41. McCarty, Humanities Computing, 3.

42. Vanhoutte, “Gates of Hell,” 131.

43. McCarty, “Becoming Interdisciplinary,” 94.

44. Kirschenbaum, “What Is Digital Humanities?,” 6; Schreibman, Siemens, and Unsworth, Companion.

45. Ramsay, comment on Golumbia, “‘Digital Humanities’: Two Definitions.”

46. Ramsay, “DH Types One and Two.”

47. John Unsworth to adhoc mailing list, August 16, 2002, http://lists.village.virginia.edu/lists_archive/adhoc/0000.html

48. Svensson, “Humanities Computing,” par. 35.

49. Lisa Lena Opas-Hanninen to adhoc mailing list, April 13, 2005, http://lists.village.virginia.edu/lists_archive/adhoc/0167.html

50. Matthew Kirschenbaum, June 18, 2011, 6:15 p.m., comment on Alex Reid, “Digital Humanities Tactics,” Digital Digs, June 17, 2011, http://www.alex-reid.net/2011/06/digital-humanities-tactics.html

51. EADH, Twitter post, September 19, 2012, 10:37 a.m., https://twitter.com/eadh_org/status/248475849551142916/

52. EADH, ALLC Annual General Meeting.

53. EADH, “About.”

54. Vanhoutte, “Gates of Hell,” 129.

55. EADH, “EADH Membership Report.”

56. EADH, ALLC Committee Meeting.

57. Fiormonte, “Towards a Cultural Critique.”

58. “Governance Protocol.”

59. EADH, “Mission.”

60. “Digital Humanities,” Wikipedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_humanities/

61. Hockey, “History of Humanities Computing,” 3.

62. de Smedt, “Some Reflections,” 95.

63. Smith, “Human Touch Software,” 4.

64. Victorian Women Writers Project, “Encoding Overview”; Willett, “Victorian Women Writers Project.”

65. “Women Writers in Context,” The Women Writers Project, http://www.wwp.northeastern.edu/context/#. See also “Exhibit,” The Women Writers Project, http://www.wwp.northeastern.edu/research/publications/exhibits/. Cf. also Risam, “On Disruption, Race, and the Digital Humanities.”

66. See, e.g., McCarty, Humanities Computing.

67. Vanhoutte, “Gates of Hell,” 139.

68. Juola, “Killer Applications,” 83.

69. Terras, “Disciplined,” 236.

70. Hockey, “History of Humanities Computing,” 15.

71. Sterne, “Audio in Digital Humanities Authorship.”

72. McCarty, Humanities Computing, 136.

73. Hockey, “History of Humanities Computing,” 3.

74. Unsworth to adhoc mailing list, August 16, 2002.

75. See EADH, “ALLC: Proposed Name Change,” December 20, 2011, http://eadh.org/news-events/allc-proposed-name-change; EADH, ALLC Annual General Meeting.

76. “Admissions Protocol ADHO: Alliance of Digital Humanities Organisations: Admission of new organisations,” http://adho.org/administration/admissions-committee/admissions-protocol (2008).

77. Association for Computers and the Humanities, “ACH Annual General Meeting.”

78. CenterNet, “Join.”

79. Ibid.

80. Fraistat, “Function,” 288, 281.

81. Mark Sample, “On the Death of the Digital Humanities Center,” Sample Reality, March 26, 2012, http://www.samplereality.com/2010/03/26/on-the-death-of-the-digital-humanities-center/

82. Zorich, “Digital Humanities Centers,” 70–71.

83. CenterNet, “CenterNet to Join ADHO.”

84. CenterNet, “Join.”

85. CenterNet, “International Directory.”

86. Prescott, “Small Worlds and Big Tents.”

87. Fiormonte, “Towards a Cultural Critique.”

88. CHCI Network, “Digital Humanities Initiative.”

89. O’Donnell, “Report.”

90. Ben W. Brumfield, Twitter post, February 4, 2013, 8:12 a.m., http://twitter.com/benwbrum/

91. Ortega, “Crisscrossing Borders.”

92. Monclova, “Transformative Mediations?”

93. Alexis Lothian, “#transformDH and Transformativity,” Queer Geek Theory, January 9, 2012, http://www.queergeektheory.org/2012/01/transformdh-and-transformativity/

94. #transformDH Collective Blog, “About #transformDH.”

95. Based on a Google search (“adho movement digital humanities”) and going through the first one hundred hits, March 26, 2015.

96. THATcamp, “About.”

97. Roger Whitson, “Does DH Really Need to Be Transformed? My Reflections on #mla12,” Roger T. Whitson Ph.D., January 8, 2012, http://www.rogerwhitson.net/?p=1358

98. Andrew Prescott, “#transformDH,” Digital Riffs, February 2012. http://digitalriffs.blogspot.se/2012/02/transformdh.html

99. CUNY DHI, Twitter post, February 12, 2013, 12:16 p.m., https://twitter.com/cunydhi/status/301424574074060800

100. Prescott, “#transformDH.”

101. #transformDH.

102. Vanhoutte, “Gates of Hell,” 144.

103. Digital Humanities 2011, “General CFP.”

104. See Svensson, “Humanities Computing.”

105. Alex Reid, “The Digital Humanities Divide,” Digital Digs, February 17, 2011, http://www.alex-reid.net/2011/02/the-digital-humanities-divide.html

106. Hugh Cayless, “DH Tea Leaves,” Scriptio Continua, December 28, 2010, http://philomousos.blogspot.com/2010/12/dh-tea-leaves.html

107. Whitney Trettien, “Digital Humanities vs. the Digital Humanist,” Hyperstudio, April 26, 2010, http://hyperstudio.mit.edu/blog/thoughts/digital-humanities-vs-the-digital-humanist/

108. ADHO, “Minutes: ADHO Steering Committee Meeting, 2015 (Sydney),” June 28–29, 2015. http://adho.org/administration/steering/minutes-adho-steering-committee-meeting-2015-sydney

109. Risam, “Beyond the Margins.”

Chapter 3

1. Alan Liu, “‘Why I’m in It’ x 2—Antiphonal Response to Stephan Ramsay on Digital Humanities and Cultural Criticism,” Alan Liu, September 13, 2013, http://liu.english.ucsb.edu/why-im-in-it-x-2-antiphonal-response-to-stephan-ramsay-on-digital-humanities-and-cultural-criticism/

2. Svensson, “Building a Virtual World.”

3. Shanks, “Media as Modes of Engagement.”

4. Vanhoutte, “Gates of Hell.”

5. Michel et al., “Quantitative Analysis.”

6. Haber, “Data and Desire in Academic Life.”

7. Bolter and Gromala, Windows and Mirrors, 15. See also Wiberg, Interaction Society, which discusses the development of information technology use from crunching numbers to social interaction.

8. See Golumbia, Cultural Logic.

9. Hopkins, “Future U.”

10. Laue, “How the Computer Works,” 159.

11. DigiPal, “Home.”

12. DigiPal, “About.”

13. Gitelman and Jackson, introduction, 1.

14. Manovich, “Cultural Analytics.” The extent of qualitative analysis in cultural analytics is debatable. Lev Manovich tends to present a strong quantitative model; for a discussion of quantitative cultural analysis, see, e.g., Manovich, “How to Follow.” For a discussion of qualitative elements, see Eduardo Navas, “Notes on Cultural Analytics Seminar, December 16–17, 2009, CALIT2, San Diego,” Remix Theory, December 29, 2009, http://remixtheory.net/?p=408

15. Manovich, “How to Follow.”

16. See, e.g., Douglass, “Cultural Analytics.”

17. Kitchin, “Big Data.”

18. Thomas LaMarre to empyre@lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au, February 8, 2010, “Visualization as the New Language of Theory,” http://lists.cofa.unsw.edu.au/pipermail/empyre/2010-February/002557.html

19. See Kirschenbaum, “‘So the Colors Cover the Wires.’”

20. Drucker, SpecLab, 6.

21. Kagan, Three Cultures, 4.

22. Janlert and Jonsson, “Kulturlaboratoriet [The Culture Laboratory].”

23. Catherine D’Ignazio, “What Would Feminist Data Visualization Look Like,” Blog entry, MIT Center for Civic Media, December 20, 2015. https://civic.mit.edu/feminist-data-visualization

24. Ratto, “Epistemic Commitments,” 60.

25. Klein, Humanities, Culture, and Interdisciplinarity, 24–28.

26. Davidson and Goldberg, “Engaging the Humanities,” 49.

27. Drucker, SpecLab, 28.

28. KTH, Division of History, Science, Technology and Environment, “Views from a Distance.”

29. Bogost and Montfort, “Platform Studies.”

30. Piet Zwart Media Design Master, “Software Studies,” http://pzwart3.wdka.hro.nl/wiki/Software_Studies/

31. HaCCS Lab, “About.”

32. Parikka, “On Designerization.”

33. Leorke, “Rebranding the Platform,” 266–67.

34. David M. Berry, “Digital Humanities: First, Second, and Third Wave,” Stunlaw, January 14, 2011, http://stunlaw.blogspot.com/2011/01/digital-humanities-first-second-and.html

35. Stanford Humanities Center, “How Is Humanities Research Conducted?”

36. Modern Language Association, “Guidelines.”

37. “About DHQ”. Digital Humanities Quarterly. http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/about/about.html

38. Schnapp and Shanks, “Artereality,” 134.

39. Robles-Anderson and Svensson, “‘One Damn Slide After Another’: PowerPoint at every Occasion for Speech.”

40. Manovich, Software Takes Command, 134.

41. Ibid., 142.

42. Issuu, accessed December 1, 2013, http://issuu.com/

43. Lindgren, “Social Science”; Sterne, “Footnotes.”

44. Holmberg, “Forgotten Encyclopedia.” The video trailer has not been published.

45. Linn Holmberg, personal communication with the author, November 2014.

46. Sousanis, Unflattening.

47. Dobson, “Blendie.”

48. McPherson, “Introduction,” 120.

49. Swedish Higher Education Authority, “Quality.”

50. REF2014, “Research Excellence Framework.”

51. Prescott, “Small Worlds and Big Tents.”

52. Ippolito et al., “New Criteria.”

53. McPherson, “We Need Some Transitional Models.”

54. Sousanis, Unflattening.

55. Daniel, “Public Secrets.”

56. Raley, Tactical Media, 14.

57. Drucker, SpecLab, 31, 29.

58. Postcolonial Digital Humanities, “Rewriting Wikipedia Project.”

59. These particular topics were discussed during the event “Ideas in Circulation: Libraries, Presses, Platforms,” organized by the Futures Initiative, CUNY Graduate Center, February 5, 2016. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ideas-in-circulation-open-scholarship-for-social-justice-tickets-20792182979

60. Ratto and Ree, “Materialization of Information.”

61. IATH, “‘Is Humanities Computing an Academic Discipline?’”

62. Flanders and Unsworth, “Evolution of Humanities Computing Centers.”

63. Galison, Image and Logic; Galison, “Trading with the Enemy,” 27.

64. Galison, “Trading with the Enemy,” 36.

65. Pratt, “Arts of the Contact Zone,” 34.

66. Bey, T.A.Z.

67. Thomassen, “Uses and Meaning.”

68. Iedema et al., “Corridor Work,” 239.

69. Collins, Evans, and Gorman, “Trading Zones.”

70. Ibid.

71. Star and Griesemer, “Institutional Ecology.”

72. Ibid., 408.

73. Ibid., 387.

74. Ratto, “Critical Making: Conceptual and Material Studies.”

75. Ramsay and Rockwell, “Developing Things.”

76. Ratto, “Critical Making: Conceptual and Material Studies,” 258.

77. Livingstone, Putting Science in Its Place.

78. See, e.g., “HASS Committee on the Humanities Library, Final Report,” Humanities Library Report, MIT, 2001.

79. See Ratto, “Critical Making: Conceptual and Material Studies.”

80. Roser and Merson, “Have Academics Forgotten?”

81. See Shannon Christine Mattern, “DH: The Name That Does No Favors,” Words in Space, February 17, 2011, http://www.wordsinspace.net/wordpress/2011/02/17/dh-the-name-that-does-no-favors/

82. Fraistat, “Function.”

83. Walsh and Ungson, “Organizational Memory,” 69.

84. Klein, Crossing Boundaries, 101.

85. See Svensson, “From Optical Fiber to Conceptual Cyberinfrastructure.”

86. See, e.g., Turner, From Counterculture to Cyberculture; Streeter, Net Effect.

87. Svensson, “Envisioning the Digital Humanities.”

88. Hacking the Academy, “What This Is.”

89. David Parry, “The MLA, @briancroxall, and the Non-Rise of the Digital Humanities,” AcademHack, January 6, 2010, http://academhack.outsidethetext.com/home/2010/the-mla-briancroxall-and-the-non-rise-of-the-digital-humanities/

90. E.g., Nussbaum, Not for Profit; Donoghue, Last Professors.

91. Taylor, Crisis on Campus; Nussbaum, Not for Profit; Stanley Fish, “Will the Humanities Save Us?,” Opinionator (New York Times), January 6, 2008, http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/06/will-the-humanities-save-us/; Parker, “Humanities’ ‘Peculiar’ . . . or All Important . . . ‘Practices.’”

92. Wayne Bivens-Tatum, “The ‘Crisis’ in the Humanities,” Academic Librarian, November 5, 2010, https://blogs.princeton.edu/librarian/2010/11/the_crisis_in_the_humanities/

93. Johanna Drucker and Patrik Svensson, “The Why and How of Middleware” (accepted for publication by Digital Humanities Quarterly).

94. Ralón, “Interview.”

95. Omeka, “Omeka.”

96. Shannon Christine Mattern, “Intellectual Furnishing: The Physical and Conceptual Architectures of Our Knowledge Institutions,” Words in Space, February 26, 2014, http://www.wordsinspace.net/wordpress/2014/02/26/7542/

97. Latour, Politics of Nature; Stengers, Power and Invention.

Chapter 4

1. Rockwell, “As Transparent as Infrastructure.”

2. Maria Börjesson, Jonas Eliasson, and Per Kågeson, “Tågens höghastighetsbanor en dålig affär för samhället,” Dagens Nyheter, January 1, 2016. http://www.dn.se/debatt/tagens-hoghastighetsbanor-en-dalig-affar-for-samhallet/

3. See, e.g., Atkins et al., Revolutionizing Science and Engineering.

4. Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet), “Function.”

5. Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet), “Projektdatabas [Project Database].”

6. Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet), “Människa, Kultur och Samhälle [Humanity, Culture and Society].”

7. Starosielski, “Warning: Do Not Dig.”

8. Chemical Biological Centre, “Welcome to KBC.”

9. ESFRI, Strategy Report, 7.

10. Merriam-Webster Online, s.v. “infrastructure,” http://mw4.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/infrastructure

11. Edwards et al., “Introduction,” 365.

12. See Borgman, Scholarship.

13. CISE, “About ACI.”

14. Borgman, Scholarship, 22–23.

15. Kitchin, “Big Data,” 8–9.

16. See Rockwell, “As Transparent as Infrastructure.”

17. Moulin, “Research Infrastructures,” 4.

18. Rockwell, “As Transparent as Infrastructure”; Green, “Cyberinfrastructure.”

19. Atkins et al., Revolutionizing Science and Engineering, 31.

20. Borgman, Scholarship, 30.

21. American Council of Learned Societies, Our Cultural Commonwealth.

22. As demonstrated by the NSF’s funding of various workshops and initiatives. See, e.g., HASTAC, “Expanding Cyber-Communities,” http://www.hastac.org/node/496/

23. Hey and Trefethen, “E-Science,” 15.

24. Andrew Prescott, “Thinking about Infrastructure,” Digital Riffs, February 2012, http://digitalriffs.blogspot.se/2012/02/thinking-about-infrastructure.html

25. E.g., Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet), “Samhällen och Kulturer i Förändring [Societies and Cultures in Change]”; Turner, “Burning Man at Google.”

26. Moulin, “Research Infrastructures,” 3.

27. See, e.g., ibid., 15–16.

28. American Council of Learned Societies, Our Cultural Commonwealth, 6.

29. Drucker, “Blind Spots.”

30. Blackwell and Crane, “Conclusion.”

31. Bentkowska-Kafel, “Needs.”

32. See, e.g., Roper, “New Humanities Workstation,” 131; Gibbons et al., New Production of Knowledge, 94.

33. Parker, “Speaking Out,” 51–52.

34. Fraistat, “Function,” 281.

35. I-CHASS, “About Us.”

36. Burnette, Gillis, and Cochran, “Humanist and the Library,” 182.

37. Grafton, Worlds Made by Words, 2–5.

38. AHRC, “Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities—Big Data Projects Call.”

39. AHRC, “Digital Transformations in the Arts and Humanities: Big Data Research.”

40. Ibid., 3.

41. Ibid., 4.

42. Gitelman and Jackson, introduction, 4.

43. See, e.g., Bonnett, Rockwell, and Kuchmey, “High Performance Computing.”

44. Rockwell and Meredith-Lobay, “Mind the Gap.”

45. American Council of Learned Societies, Our Cultural Commonwealth, 8.

46. Sterne, “Digital Media and Disciplinarity,” 251.

47. Bowker, Memory Practices, 123.

48. Prescott, “Thinking about Infrastructure.”

49. Bowker and Star, Sorting Things Out, 33.

50. Melissa Terras to Humanist Mailing List, July 27, 2009, no. 7, http://lists.digitalhumanities.org/pipermail/humanist/2009-July/000622.html

51. Ratto, “Epistemic Commitments.”

52. Ratto, “Already False, Potentially True.”

53. See Erickson and Kellogg, “Social Translucence.”

54. Dourish and Bly, “Portholes,” 541.

55. Merkel, “Folkloristics”; Jamieson et al., “Place and Space”; Gonsalvez and Atchison, “Implementing Studios.”

56. See Mitchell, “Places for Learning.”

57. Ibid.

58. Fällman, “Supporting Studio Culture,” 5.

59. Buren, “Function of the Studio,” 160.

60. See Manovich, “Archeology of a Computer Screen.”

61. Franklin and Rodriguez’G, “Next Big Thing.”

62. Defanti et al., “OptIPortal.”

63. Friedberg, Virtual Window, 3; Manovich, “Archeology.”

64. Brooks, “What’s Real?”

65. Manovich, “Archeology.”

66. Sandin interviewed in Russett, Hyperanimation, 183.

67. Bolter and Gromala, Windows and Mirrors, 54.

68. Oculus VR, “Oculus Rift.”

69. Lindhé, “Medieval Materiality.”

70. Friedberg, Virtual Window, 205, 232.

71. Colomina, “Enclosed by Images.”

72. Jacobs, Opening Doors, 1.

73. See Arnheim, Power of the Center, 73.

74. John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University, “Humanities Laboratories”; HASTAC.

Chapter 5

1. STEM to STEAM.

2. “Interview: Natalie Jeremijenko,” Center for the Study of the Drone, Bard College, November 13, 2013. http://dronecenter.bard.edu/interview-natalie-jeremijenko/

3. Vyas et al., “Collaborative Practices,” 156.

4. Lindhé, “Rethinking Medieval Spaces.”

5. Ratto, “Critical Making: Conceptual and Material Studies.”

6. Menand, Marketplace of Ideas, 62.

7. Gouglas et al., “Before the Beginning.”

8. Giroux, “Public Intellectuals.”

9. Ingeno, “Crowdfunding Academic Research.”

10. Walker, “Curator as a Custodian,” 292.

11. Association of Art Museum Curators, “Professional Practices.”

12. Galison and Schnapp, “Science Museum Futures.”

13. Ralón, “Interview.”

14. See, e.g., Higgs, “Between the Audience and the Stage”; Donegan, “Between Zones.”

15. Star and Griesemer, “Institutional Ecology.”

16. Flanders and Muñoz, “Introduction.”

17. Constantopoulos and Dallas, “Aspects of a Digital Curation Agenda,” 2.

18. Drabinski, “Queering the Catalog,” 108.

19. Burdick et al., Digital_Humanities, 34.

20. Cook, “Immateriality and Its Discontents,” 28.

21. “Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments,” MLA Commons, accessed January 23, 2016. https://digitalpedagogy.commons.mla.org/

22. Glass, “Social Paper.”

23. Gil, “Ed: A Minimal Edition Theme for Jekyll.”

24. Chelsea Emelie Kelly, “What Does It Mean to ‘Curate’?,” Under the Wings, June 15, 2012, http://blog.mam.org/2012/06/15/what-does-it-mean-to-curate/

25. TED, “Curating Speakers.”

26. John Hope Franklin Humanities Institute, Duke University, “Audiovisualities Lab.”

27. Graham and Cook, Rethinking Curating, 10.

28. Shaw, “Who’s Driving?.”

29. Shared Horizons, “About.”

30. Barker and Smithen, “New Art, New Challenges,” 95; American Association of Museums, Curators Committee, “Code of Ethics.”

31. Graham and Cook, Rethinking Curating, 10.

32. Crow, “Research University,” 214.

33. Duke University Press Log, “Nicholas Mirzoeff Extends His Book.”

34. Deegan and McCarty, Collaborative Research, back cover.

35. Sue Stone, “Humanities Scholars.”

36. Bey, T.A.Z.

37. Galison, “Trading Zone,” 137.

38. James Cronin to Humanist mailing list, September 1, 2010, no. 2, http://lists.digitalhumanities.org/pipermail/humanist/2010-September/008350.html

39. See, e.g., Repko, Interdisciplinary Research, 44.

40. Shanks, “Digital Humanities.”

41. Risam, “Beyond the Margins.”

42. Orgega, “Crisscrossing Borders.”

43. Warf and Arias, introduction to Spatial Turn.

44. Lefebvre, Production of Space.

45. Meusburger, “Milieus of Creativity,” 97.

46. Livingstone, Putting Science in Its Place, 86.

47. See ibid., 179; Burke, Social History of Knowledge, 56; Martin, Organizational Complex, 183.

48. Mattern, New Downtown Library, viii.

49. Connelly, Dames, and Tenen, “Open Letter.”

50. Studio@Butler, “Frequently Asked Questions.”

51. Sandy Stone, “On Being Trans.”

52. Hirsch, “</Parentheses>,” 3.

53. Rebecca Frost Davis et al., “Announcing Digital Pedagogy in the Digital Humanities: Concepts, models, and experiments,” accessed March 21, 2015, https://github.com/curateteaching/digitalpedagogy/blob/master/announcement.md/; Hirsch, Digital Humanities Pedagogy.

54. Davidson and Goldberg, Future of Thinking, 199.

55. Bowker and Star, “Invisible Mediators,” 147.

56. Ursula Heise, personal communication with the author, November 2013.

57. Brian Croxall, “DH2013: The Future of Undergraduate Digital Humanities,” Research, Teaching, Technology, July 17, 2013, http://www.briancroxall.net/events/9/the-future-of-undergraduate-digital-humanities/; Kolowich, “Behind the Digital Curtain.”

58. Auletta, “Get Rich U.”

59. Coursera, “About Coursera.”

60. Svensson, Språkutbildning i en Digital Värld.

61. Ian Bogost, “What Grows When MOOCs Grow?,” Videogame Theory, Criticism, Design, August 18, 2013, http://www.bogost.com/blog/what_grows_when_moocs_grow.shtml

62. Noble, Digital Diploma Mills.

63. P-O. Rehnquist, “Storskaliga Öppna Nätkurser—MOOC—Det Går Inte Över!,” October 3, 2013, http://peosblogg.wordpress.com/2013/10/03/storskaliga-oppna-natkurser-mooc-det-gar-inte-over/

64. Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, “The Dark Side of the Digital Humanities—Part 1,” Thinking C21, January 9, 2013, http://www.c21uwm.com/2013/01/09/the-dark-side-of-the-digital-humanities-part-1/

65. Matthew Kirschenbaum, Twitter post, January 4, 2013, 10:50 a.m., http://www.twitter.com/mkirschenbaum. Kirschenbaum tweeted, “Four minutes into #s307, and the conflation of MOOCs and DH has begun. #mla13.”

66. Richard Grusin, “The Dark Side of the Digital Humanities—Part 2,” Thinking C21, January 9, 2013, http://www.c21uwm.com/2013/01/09/dark-side-of-the-digital-humanities-part-2/

67. Rita Raley, “The Dark Side of the Digital Humanities—Part 4,” Thinking C21, January 9, 2013, http://www.c21uwm.com/2013/01/09/the-dark-side-of-the-digital-humanities-part-4/

Epilogue

1. Jonathan Sterne to Air-L (Association of Internet Researchers) mailing list, “Book Prices,” March 9, 2011, http://skryb.info/m/air-l@listserv.aoir.org/569CC7B9-7D2F-43DC-A4DE-3D731CD3E19B@mcgill.ca

2. Drucker, “Making Space into Place.”

3. Maeda, “Master’s programs at Umeå University across science-technology-engineering and humanities-arts?”, Workshop, Decembe 12, 2013. http://www.umu.se/english/about-umu/news-events/calendar/display-page/new-research-in-interactive-architecture-to-be-presented-at-international-conference.cid86258?eventId=6666

4. Ratto, “Critical making workshop: fixsels,” “Sorting the Digital Humanities Out,” December 6, 2013. http://www.humlab.umu.se/en/research-development/events/archive/sorting-the-digital-humanities-out/program/

5. Kirschenbaum, Mechanisms; Drucker, SpecLab.

6. Tara McPherson, Twitter post, December, 6, 2012, 1:28 p.m., https://storify.com/JimBarrett/media-places-2012-day-two

7. Andrew Prescott, Twitter post, December 15, 2013, 11:00 a.m., https://twitter.com/Ajprescott/status/412296170787323905

8. This group included Eric Carlsson, Mathias Crawford, Carl-Erik Engqvist, Anna Foka, and Helga Sadowski.

9. This group included Cameron Blevins, Finn Brunton, Tomas Karlsson, Fredrik Palm, and Lindsay Thomas.

10. This group included James Barrett, Paul Conway, Marin Dacos, Matts Lindström, Thomas Nygren, and Hanna Zipernovszky.

11. This group included Jonas Ingvarsson, Virginia Langum, Mattis Lindmark, Mats Malm, Jennie Olofsson, and Andrew Reinhard.

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Bibliography

Additional Information

ISBN
9780472121748
Related ISBN
9780472073061
MARC Record
OCLC
1017612441
Pages
233-248
Launched on MUSE
2018-01-03
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC-ND
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