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245 NOTES INTRODUCTION 1 Loftsdóttir 2010. 2 In the context of volcanic eruptions in Iceland, as I worked on this book in September 2014, volcanologists were arguing whether fluoride or sulfur from this late 1700s eruption killed the animals. See vulkan.blog.is for this discussion. 3 This weekly periodical Þjóðólfur is http://timarit.is/view_page_init​ .jsp?issId=136976. The first segment appears to have been in 1892. 4 “Húsið, sem flestir skoða” 1972. 5 Magnúsdóttir 1979. 6 With Jón Ólafsson, Thurídur lived at Laugarnes, near Reykjavík. Magnúsdóttir 1979. 7 G. Jónsson (1949, 328) in a footnote points out some discrepancies in these dates. He also notes another relationship, with Gísli Þorgilsson, with whom he says Thurídur lived in 1828–29. 8 Magnúsdóttir 1979; “Þuríður formaður” 1994; B. Jónsson 1941 [1893]. 9 Pfeiffer 2007, 44 [1853]; “Húsið, sem flestir skoða” 1972. 10 Binkley 2002; Binkley 2005; Grzetic 2004. 11 MacAlister, Elliott, and Partners 2002. 12 Stella 1996, 176. 13 Yodanis 2000. 14 Kristjánsdóttir 2013, 30. 15 John McPhee (1989) wrote a great account of this event in his book The Control of Nature. 16 S. G. Magnússon 2010. 17 Magnúsdóttir 1979; Magnúsdóttir 1984. 18 “Við getum ef við viljum” 1985, 12–13. 19 “Bergsættarkonurnar voru fisknar” 1984, 15. 20 “Sjómennskan er atvinna sem bæði kynin hafa og geta stundað” 1994, 66–69. 246 NOTES TO CHAPTER ONE 21 “Íslenskar konur eru góðir sjómenn” 2000, C-7. Her statement in Icelandic was “Þessu var ágætlega tekið af mínum prófessorum en að vísu nefndu þeir nú hvort ég gæti ekki hugsað mér eitthvað annað.” 22 “Sjókonur ófáar á Íslandi” 1984, 52–53. 23 Hákonardóttir 1985, 70–71. 24 Magnúsdóttir 1985. 25 Magnúsdóttir 1988. 26 Willson 2013. CHAPTER ONE 1 Sigurðardóttir 1985. 2 I. Jónsdóttir 1922. 3 Valdimarsdóttir 1997; see also Skúlason 1984, 33–35; Skúlason 1950, 47–49; Hermannsson 1977, 218–19. 4 She lived at Ballará. 5 Hermannsson 1976, 77, 201–3; Sigurðardóttir 1985. 6 Gudrún had been married to a man named Kolbeinn from Frakkanes. In another account her name is given as Kristín. See Eggerz 1950. 7 Eggerz 1950. 8 Hermannsson 1976, 207–8; Sigurðardóttir 1985, 28. 9 Gunnarsson 1987. 10 Ibid. 11 Certain men could be “free laborers” until the late 1700s, but since farmers did not like this, the regulation was later changed so that all nonlandholders had to be tethered to a farm. See Gunnarsson 1983, 21. 12 Gunnarsson 1987. 13 Gunnarsson 1983, 17. 14 Gunnarsson 1983, 14; Gunnarsson 1987. 15 Gunnarsson 1987. 16 Magnúsdóttir 1979. 17 Gunnarsson 1983, 14. 18 Vasey 1996, 166. 19 Garðarsdóttir 2002, 22; Vasey 1996, 162. 20 Gunnarsson 1983, 20. 21 Gunnlaugsson 1993. 22 The singular form of omagar is omagi. 23 This is according to the database Íslendingabók, which contains genealogical information about the inhabitants of Iceland dating back more than twelve hundred years. 24 I. Jónsdóttir 1922, 48–49. 25 Gunnarsson 1987. 26 Gunnarsson 1983, 18. Notes to Chapter ONE 247 27 Sigurðardóttir 1985. 28 “Sjókonur ófáar á Íslandi” 1984, 52–53. 29 Skúlason 1984; Sigurðardóttir 1985. 30 Yngvadóttir 1987. 31 Skúlason 1984; Magnúsdóttir 1984. 32 I. Jónsdóttir 1922. 33 Vasey 1996, 163–64. 34 Gunnarsson 1983, 18. 35 Yngvadóttir 1987; Sigurðardóttir 1985. 36 Vasey 1996, 163–64. 37 Sigurðardóttir 1985. 38 Gunnarsson 1987, 252. 39 Most boats were undecked despite the Danes’ introducing a limited number of decked boats in the late 1700s. See Gunnarsson 1983, 22. 40 Some konubátar, although very different from the ones in Greenland, existed. These boats were used by women who had to milk cows or tend sheep on a different island from the farms where they usually stayed. These rowboats had neither mast nor sails but were usually adapted for the short rowing distances between islands. Skúlason claims that no man would ever want to be offered use of such a boat. Skúlason 1970, 123; see also Sigurðardóttir 1983. 41 Óla 1972, 190–93. 42 Stefánsson and Roughton 2010. 43 Katrín’s...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780295806471
Related ISBN
9780295995502
MARC Record
OCLC
949276285
Pages
312
Launched on MUSE
2016-07-09
Language
English
Open Access
No
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