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Index Page numbers in italics followed by f represent figures. Page numbers in italics followed by t represent tables. AAAQ framework for health facilities, goods, and services, 107–11, 108f; acceptability, 108f, 110; accessibility, 108f, 109–10; application to preventing maternal deaths and obstetric complications, 107–11, 108f; availability, 108f, 109; and the CESCR, 107–11; quality of care, 108f, 110–11; role of social determinants of health, 108–9; the three-delays model of maternal mortality risks, 108, 108f abortion rights: Argentine Supreme Court, 34–35; and the biomedical paradigm, 80; Colombian Constitutional Court, 34; courts’ dignity arguments in striking down restrictions, 34–35; denial of access to therapeutic abortion (as cruel and inhuman treatment), 39; domestic legislation and judicial victories, 93; Peru, 39, 89; U.S. Supreme Court and preclusion of federal funding to subsidize, 66, 259n49 accountability in a human rights–based approach to health, 16, 131–56, 237–38; “Accountability for Reasonableness,” 121–24, 152, 171, 201–2; changing relationships and power dynamics, 134–37, 135f; the “circle of accountability” framework, 15, 102, 111–16, 112f, 134–38, 135f, 241; defining what we mean by accountability, 134–37; duty-bearers and claims-holders, 16, 68–69, 97–98, 105t, 106, 133–34, 159, 223, 233; forms and mechanisms for holding actors accountable, 139–44, 237; health professionals, professional associations, and licensing, 137; the health system itself (accountability of), 137–38; and healthsector corruption, 150; identifying who is accountable, 137–38, 237; international assistance and cooperation, 214–22; judicial remedies and litigation, 93, 139–43, 143f, 148, 237, 241–42; lessons from Sierra Leone’s lack of accountability mechanisms, 16, 153–56, 237–38; “naming and shaming” individual providers and frontline health workers, 135, 136–37, 237; NHRIs’ enforcement and oversight roles, 139, 143–44; popular movements and social networks holding actors responsible, 139, 242–43; private actors and institutions, 138. See also social accountability; states’ obligations to progressive realization of health rights Accra Agenda for Action, 215 Achebe, Chinua, 3–4 ActionAid, 176, 196 Affordable Care Act (U.S.), 167, 224; and abortion funding, 66; implementation, 149; arguments against, 85 African Charter on Human and People’s Rights, 61 African National Congress (ANC), 180 Ali, Chiku, 83 Alston, Philip, 150 Alyne da Silva case, 138, 191, 241 American Convention on Human Rights, Additional Protocol to, 61 Amnesty International: and ESC rights, 131–32; maternal mortality campaign, 131–32, 153–54 298 Index The Anatomy of Revolution (Brinton), 245–46 antiretroviral (ARV) medications and therapy, 54, 90–91, 141, 148, 163 Appiah, Kwame Anthony, 30 Arab Spring, 245–46 Argentina: debt crisis, 12, 223, 229–30; Dirty War and atrocities committed by the military dictatorship, 11, 27, 33; DRI delegation and psychiatric hospitals, 229–30; Hospital Tobar García (Buenos Aires), 230; legal recognition of transgender people, 94; Riachuelo River Basin pollution case, 142 Argentine Supreme Court: dignity arguments in abortion rights rulings, 34–35; ruling on government accountability in pollution clean-up, 142 Armas, Henry, 168 Arrow, Kenneth, 199 Atala decision (Inter-American Court of Human Rights), 31 Atkinson, Anthony, 195 Bangladesh, 195 Baobab Maternity Hospital (Tanzania), 225 “basket funding,” 213 Baxi, Upendra, 246 Behind the Beautiful Forevers (Boo), 50 Beijing Conference (1995), 92, 211 bilateral tubal ligation (BTL), 54, 163, 166 Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, 214 biomedical paradigm: and abortion rights, 80; key aspects, 79–81; and mental health, 79–81; compared with WHO definition of health, 79–82, 235 Boo, Katherine, 50 Borges, Jorge Luis, 229, 231 Bosnia-Herzegovina, war in, 203–4 Brantley, Kent, 20 Brazil: CEDAW Committee report on the Alyne da Silva case, 138, 191, 241; constitutionally created health councils, 170; growing inequalities, 196; judicialization of health rights, 189 BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa), 196 Brinton, Crane, 245–46 British Department for International Development (DFID), 153–54 Broad Movement of Women (Movimiento Amplio de Mujeres, or MAM) (Peru), 178 Brundtland, Gro, 225–26 Buber, Martin, 29 budgets: in the “circle of accountability” framework, 112f, 113–14; Reagan’s cuts to social spending, 20; and states’ implementation of progressive realization of health rights, 149–51; tax evasion and illicit financial flows, 221–22; tax revenues and health spending, 150–51, 221 Bush, George W., 37 Bustreo, Flavia, 215 Cairo Conference (International Conference on Population and Development) (1994), 91–92, 93, 211 Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, 192 Canadian Supreme Court, 192 cancer: death statistics, 121; denial of access to pain medication as cruel and inhuman punishment...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9780812292190
Related ISBN
9780812247749
MARC Record
OCLC
932320523
Pages
336
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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