publisher colophon

Index

Abel, Jaison R., 26–27

Abuan, Mariana, 158

Academe Today, 11

academic presses

changes in, 71, 76–77, 82–83, 132–33, 135

and dissertations, 134–35

funding cuts to, 55–56

See also specific presses

accessibility of higher education, 8–9, 10

activism

on behalf of higher education, 27–29

toward diversity, 19–20

writing as, 138–39

Adjunct Project, 28–29

adjunct system, 10–11, 171. See also contingent faculty

administrative positions, 19, 158–59

ADVANCE, 20

#alt-academy, 162, 163–64

alternative careers, 122–23, 139–40, 158–59, 162–63, 171, 174

alumni, mythology of, 35

American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 25, 26

Commission on the Humanities and the Social Sciences, 22, 195n40

Humanities Indicators, 14, 25, 27, 29, 114–15, 118

American Alliance of Museums, 31

American Association of University Professors, 11, 29, 169

American Council of Learned Societies, 41, 123

American Historical Association, 28, 57, 76, 122

American University, The (Barzun), 17

archives, 43–45, 47–48, 52, 100

Arizona State University, 26, 36, 97

article processing charge (APC), 67, 74–75, 186–87n31

assessment, 99–100, 105–6. See also evaluative criteria

Atkins, Daniel, 41, 104, 189n58

Augustsson, Nina, 92

Author’s Alliance, 80

Author’s Guild, 80

Author’s Guild v. Google (2014?), 80–81

Bady, Aaron, 95–96

Ball, David M., 164, 171–72

BambooDiRT (website), 59

Baron, Naomi S., 89

Barzun, Jacques, 16–17

Basken, Paul, 11

Bass, Randall, 98, 99

Bauerlein, Mark, 22

Bauwens, Michel, 68

Bennett, Jane, 104

Berman, Russell, 13, 24, 25, 122, 124, 126, 194n27

Berners-Lee, Tim, 51

Berubé, Michael, 24–25

Big Data, 46, 47–50, 52

blame game, the, 21–23

Bobley, Brett, 64

Bok, Derek, 97

Bologna declaration, 38–39

Book and the Renaissance, The (Pettegree), 57

book publishing, academic. See academic presses

books/the book, 57–59

access to, 67

and dissertations, 144–48

and irony, 58–59

new forms of, 60–61

open access in, 77–81

sales of, 79, 82–83

as tenure criteria, 86, 135

See also dissertations

born-digital scholarship

access to, 158

and digital technologies, 46–50

in dissertations, 141–42

new genres of, 61–62

open access in, 73

and readers’ agency, 62–63

Bousquet, Marc, 21, 32, 170

boyd, danah, 78

Braidotti, Rosi, 41, 105

branch campuses, 37–38

Brazil, 73–74

Bridging the Higher Education Divide (Century Foundation), 9

Bryant, Rebecca A., 139

Budapest statement (2002), 69

Butcher, Neil, 93, 101

Cairn, 60

Cambridge University Press, 73

Cantor, Nancy, 98

career planning, 161–63, 174

Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate, 121, 130

Carnivale, Gary, 11–12

Case Western Reserve University, 18, 126–27

Cassuto, Leonard, 124–25, 132, 137

casualization of academic labor force, 11, 111, 169–70

centerNet, 40, 63

Century Foundation, 9

Chambers, Paula, 163

Chang, Ku-ming (Kevin), 131, 132

Chicana Feminists project, 47

children, having, 19, 21, 177n5

Chronicle of Higher Education, 64, 93, 125–26, 130

Chronicle Review, 24–25

class, socioeconomic. See economic diversity, loss of; elitism discourse

climate change, 10

Coalition on the Academic Workforce, 14, 171

Cochrane, Tom, 68

cognitive shift due to new technologies, 89

Cohen, Daniel J., 61, 66, 72, 82, 184n27

Colander, D. C., 32

Cold War era, 7, 85–86

collaborations, cross-institutional

funding for, 40–41

regional, 40

transnational, 39–40

collaborative skills

and dissertations, 136–37, 142–43

distributed open collaborative courses (DOCC), 96

and graduate programs, 156, 157

and power differentials, 182n41

Commission on the Future of Graduate Education, 122

Commission on the Humanities and the Social Sciences of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 22, 195n40

commons sites, 73

communication. See scholarly communication

community college system, 9, 25, 139

completion rates, 114–16, 193n8

The Condition of Education 2010 (National Center for Education Statistics), 88

Consortium for Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI), 39, 41

Consortium of Institutional Cooperation, 70

contingent faculty, 169–72

employment in, 14

as majority, 11

See also non-tenure-track positions

Conway, Paul, 46, 58–59, 61, 69, 94

copyright issues, 44, 80–81

corporatization of universities, 10, 11–13

Cost of Knowledge statement, 70

Council of Graduate Schools, 115, 117, 121, 130

Coursera, 91, 92, 96, 190n27

Creative Commons licenses, 78, 80, 81, 189n56

Critical Commons, 52

cross-institutional initiatives, 38–40

Crossouard, Barbara, 131

Crow, Michael, 36

curation, 82–83, 141, 156

Curzan, Anne, 100

cyborg politics. See posthuman humanities scholar, the

Damrosch, David, 100, 130, 136–37, 140, 143, 160

data-based evidence, 24–27, 113–18

databases

Big Data, 46, 47–50, 52, 192n4

creation of through humanities courses, 100

decolonizing, 169

small data, 46–47

databases, open, 90

Data Curation Now, 73

Davidson, Cathy N., 40, 41, 53, 96, 99, 142

Debates in the Digital Humanities (Gold), 78–79

debt, 20–21, 114, 117–18, 119

deep reading, 48, 89, 144, 145

Deitz, Richard, 26–27

Delphi Project on the Changing Faculty and Student Success, 29

Denbo, Seth, 49

devices, 50–51, 89, 103–4, 106. See also digital technologies

“Diggable Data, Scalable Reading, and New Humanities Scholarship” (Denbo), 49

Digging Into Data grant program, 48

digital humanities

advocacy groups in, 28

and blame narrative, 23

defined, 46

demographics in, 168–69

open access in, 74

See also digital technologies

Digital Humanities Commons, 63

Digital Humanities Now, 73

Digital Humanities Quarterly, 62, 64, 74

“The Digital-Physical: On Building Flipboard for iPhone and Finding the Edges of our Digital Narratives” (Mod), 58

Digital Public Library of America, 43

digital technologies, 43–54

and the book, 57–59

and born-digital inquiry, 46–50

and digitally assisted scholarship, 45

and dissertations, 136

and the Internet of things, 50–51

and new teaching practices, 90–97, 157–58

and scholarly publication, 55–57

and scholarship on digital cultures, 45–46

and the Semantic Web, 51–52

Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), 74

dissertations, 129–54

assumptions around, 130–31

born-digital, 141–42

critiques of, 134–35

in ensemble form, 140–41, 145, 151

history of, 131–35

need for questioning genre of, 129–31

new media in, 141–43

and open access, 75–77

and scholarly networks, 136–37

schools’ requirements for, 150–52

dissertations, expansion of repertoire in

arguments for, 136–40, 143, 153–54

and cart and horse argument, 152–53

counterarguments against, 144–53

and nature of scholarly inquiry, 144–48

and students as guinea pigs, 148–50

and time-to-degree, 171

distant reading, 48, 49

distributed higher education, 35–42

distributed open collaborative courses (DOCC), 96

diversity

activism toward, 19–20

lack of, 8–9, 21, 126

of professoriate, 111, 165–69

See also students, demographics of

doctoral education

argument for transformation of, 111–12

critiques of, 134–35

cuts to programs, 125–26

data on, 113–18

and dissertation requirements, 150–52

and diversifying the humanities, 165–69, 173–74

goal of, 155

history of, 131–33

lived experience of, 118–21

model of success in, 139–40, 149, 164, 174

need for changes in, 155–60, 164

solitary model of, 86, 136–37

doctoral students

agency of, 160–62

as audience for book, 2–3

difficulties for, 119–21, 160

future prospects of, 14–15

as guinea pigs, 148–50

motivations for, 118–19

as partners in transformation of doctoral education, 127, 160–64

“Do We Dare Write for Readers?” (Germano), 138–39

Drew, Julie, 132–33, 134

Drucker, Johanna, 52–53

Duderstadt, James J., 39

Early Modern Conversions project, 41

Eatman, Timothy K., 123–24, 141

economic diversity, loss of, 8–9

Educating Scholars: Doctoral Education in the Humanities (Ehrenberg et al.), 115, 121, 149

edX, 36, 91, 92, 93, 190n27

elitism discourse, 10, 11–12, 94

Ellison, Julie, 123–24, 141

Elsevier, 56, 69, 70–71

embargo periods, 74, 75–77

employment. See job market in the humanities; job search

enrollments, trends in, 12, 24–25

equivalency, logic of, 95–96

“Essay Defending the MLA Report on Doctoral Education” (Berman), 126

essays. See short-form writing

ethnic studies, 19, 47

Europeana Digital Library, 43

European Higher Education Area, 38–39

European universities, 7, 38–39

evaluative criteria, 63–65

Eve, Martin Paul, 73

faculty

as audience for book, 3

conditions of academic life for, 18–19, 20, 21

expectations of, 85–86

gender demographics of, 14

multiple obligations of, 159

questions for, 106–7

salaries of, 13–14

as self-curators, 82–83

two-tier system, 14, 86, 93

willingness to pass less-than-excellent dissertations, 145–46

See also non-tenure-track positions; tenure-track positions

faculty governance, 11, 19, 29, 33, 133–34

feminism, 19, 47, 96

feminization of professoriate, 14, 168

FemTechNet, 96

Fernandes, Leela, 105

Fitzpatrick, Kathleen, 63, 81

Five College Digital Humanities consortium, 65

Flanders, Julia, 64

Flipboard, 58

flipped classrooms, 37, 108

Ford Foundation, 19, 130

for-profit online universities, 36

4Humanities, 28

funding

for academic presses, 55–56

for APCs, 74–75

for cross-institutional collaborations, 40–41

for humanities scholars, 167, 170

for new media initiatives, 56, 158

for public universities, 8, 12, 17

Future of Thinking, The (Davidson and Goldberg), 41

Georgia Tech Ireland, 37

Germano, William, 138–39, 146, 147

Germany, history of doctoral education in, 131–32

Gleason, William, 164, 171–72

Global Feminisms project, 47

Gold, Matthew K., 78–79

Goldberg, David Theo, 40, 53, 99

gold open access, 67–68, 74–75

Google, 43, 67, 80–81, 105

Google Books, 46, 67, 80–81, 180n1, 188n55

Google Scholar, 105

graduate education

author’s personal experience with, 17–19, 126–27

and dissertation requirements, 150–52

loss of support for, 9–10

possible changes in, 156–60

See also doctoral education

The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It (Cassuto), 124–25

graduate students

publications by, 147–48, 149

unionization for, 29

See also doctoral students

Grafton, Anthony T., 122, 139, 145

gray literature. See short-form writing

GRE, 25

Greenberg, Josh, 48

Grossman, Jim, 122, 139, 145

Grosz, Elizabeth, 173

GTC+ certificate, 157–58

Guardian, 70

“A Guide to Quality in Post-traditional Online Higher Education” (Butcher), 93

guinea pigs, doctoral students as, 148–50

Haber, Jonathan, 96

Hall, Gary, 77

Haller, Albrecht von, 132

Haraway, Donna, 105

Harvard, 91, 93

Harvard University Press, 77

HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory), 40, 48, 61, 96, 142

HathiTrust, 43, 44, 80, 180n1

Hayles, N. Katherine, 89

“The Heart of the Matter” (Commission on the Humanities and the Social Sciences of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences), 22

Hedstrom, Margaret, 43, 44

Henry, Charles, 48

higher education

decreasing support for in U.S., 7–15

distributed, 35–42

solitary model of, 86, 136–37

House Committee on Education and the Workforce, 28

Howard, Jennifer, 64

How Text Lost Its Source: Magnetic Recording Cultures (Sayers), 62

Hubbard, Dolan, 126

humanists, as allies to humanities education, 30–31

humanities, value of, 11–12, 30–31

Humanities “Crisis” and the Future of Literary Studies, The (Jay), 23

Humanities for the Environment project, 40

Humanities Indicators, 14, 25, 27, 29, 114–15, 118

Humanities Unbound: Supporting Careers and Scholarship beyond the Tenure Track (Rogers), 163–64

Humanities Without Walls initiative, 40

hyperattention (fragmented reading), 89

Imagining America project, 123

“Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research” directive (Office of Science and Technology Policy), 70

Infinite Ulysses (Visconti), 142

Inside Graduate Admissions: Merit, Diversity, and Faculty Gatekeeping (Posselt), 124–25

Inside Higher Education, 125, 126

Integrative Graduate Humanities Education and Research Training project (IGHERT), 41

intellectual labor, as gauge of value, 82

international students, 7, 8

Internet of things, the, 50–51

It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens (boyd), 78

James, William, 131

Jay, Gregory, 123–24

Jay, Paul, 23

Job Information List (MLA), 116

job market in the humanities, 26–27, 111, 116–17, 120, 122–23, 133–34

job search, 14, 18, 120, 148–49, 150, 198n9

Journal of Digital Humanities, 74

journals

access to, 67–68

and changes in publishing environment, 56

open access in, 67–71, 73–75

“The Just-In-Time Professor: A Staff Report Summarizing eForum Responses on the Working Conditions of Contingent Faculty in Higher Education” (House Committee on Education and the Workforce Democratic Staff), 28

Kajitani, Megan Pincus, 139

Keck Graduate Institute, 37

King, John Leslie, 43, 44

Kirschenbaum, Matthew G., 62

Klost, Peter H., 157

Knowledge Unlatched, 80

Krebs, Paula, 163, 166

Lambert, Lance, 12

language departments, 13, 98, 141, 176n17

Laurence, David, 116, 117, 193n1 (Time of Troubles), 193n8

Learning through Digital Media: Experiments in Technology and Pedagogy (Scholz), 78

Lee, Valerie, 166

letters of recommendation, 148–49

liberal arts colleges, expectations of faculty in, 85

libraries, 43–44, 56, 80, 82–83

linguistics, 51

Linguistics Society of America, 25

“Liquid Books” series, 77

literary studies, 48–49

Liu, Alan, 28, 49–50, 53, 57–58

location, of universities, 35–42

Lohe, Debra Rudder, 157

long form

the book as signifier of, 58, 59

proto-monograph as preparation for book, 130–31, 146–48

students’ rejection of, 89

See also books/the book; dissertations

Lothian, Alexis, 168

Lunsford, Andrea Abernethy, 142

Maisto, Maria, 28

manifesto for sustainable humanities, 108–9

Mapping Colonial Americas Publishing project, 47

massive open online courses (MOOCs), 10, 91–96

“A Master Plan for Higher Education in the Midwest” (Duderstadt), 39

materiality, 58, 103–4

McCrory, Pat, 12

McDonald, Dwight, 155

McGann, Jerome, 44, 48, 50

McGill University, 41, 124

McPherson, Tara, 52, 59, 60, 61–62, 168–69

Mechanical MOOC, 92

MediaCommons (website), 63, 81

MediaCommons Press, 78

media studies, 45–46, 50

Medical Humanities Network, 39–40

Medieval Academy of America, 76

Medieval Review, 74

Mellon Foundation, 40, 41, 46, 56, 60, 158

Mellon Graduate Education Initiative, 115, 121

mentoring, 18, 31, 143, 159

Me++: The Cyborg Self and the Networked City (Mitchell), 103

Miller, Richard, 100

Minerva Schools, 37

MIT, 91, 93

Mitchell, William J., 103

Mod, Craig, 58

Modern Language Association (MLA)

advocacy through, 28, 176n17, 200n14

convention of, 18

evaluative criteria of, 64

and job market, 116, 178n28

and open access, 73

report on criteria for tenure and promotion, 131, 133–34, 135, 149, 159

Task Force on Doctoral Study in Modern Language and Literature, 116, 124, 129, 131, 135, 149, 167

Monkman, Leslie, 135

monographs. See books/the book; dissertations

Moretti, Franco, 46, 49

museums, 31, 43, 47, 163

National Academies, 9, 27–28, 39, 114, 195n40

National Center for Education Statistics, 88

National Endowment for the Humanities, 19, 28, 48, 90

National Humanities Alliance, 28

National Institutes of Health, 69–70

National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, 117

National Research Council, 9, 39, 114–15, 195n40

National Science Foundation, 113

The Net Effect: Romanticism, Capitalism, and the Internet (Streeter), 78

networks, scholarly, 136–37, 159

Networks and Neighborhoods, 74

New Faculty Majority, 28, 171

Newfield, Christopher, 26

Newman, Jonah, 93

new media, 55–66

and the book, 57–59

funding for initiatives in, 56, 158

“The New Rigor” initiative, 65

New York Times, 8, 25, 92

New York University, 29, 36

New York University Press, 63, 78

NINES (Networked Infrastructure for Nineteenth-Century Electronic Scholarship), 47, 63

“No More Plan B” (Grafton and Grossman), 122, 139

non-tenure-track positions

advocacy for, 28–29, 170–71

conditions for faculty in, 21, 170

imbalance in, 14, 86, 93, 116–17, 120, 169–70

as majority, 11, 32, 169

See also tenure-track positions

nostalgia, turn away from, 16–20

Nowviskie, Bethany, 44–45, 53, 162, 163, 169, 182n41

OER. See open educational resources (OER)

Office of Science and Technology Policy, 70

Oh, Soo, 93

Olson, Gary A., 132–33, 134

Omnibus Appropriations Act (2009), 69–70

One Culture report (Williford and Henry), 52, 182n35

online degree programs, 35–37, 97

massive open online courses (MOOCs), 10, 91–96

open access, 67–84

call for in humanities, 71–72

call for in STEM fields, 69–71

changes resulting from, 81–84

in dissertations, 75–77

in journal publications, 73–75

in long-form books, 77–81

modes of, 67–68

reasons for scholars to go open, 68

in short-form writing, 73

in teaching, 90–97

Open Access and the Humanities: Contexts, Controversies and the Future (Eve), 73

“Open Access Publishing and Scholarly Values” (Cohen), 82

open and distance learning (ODL), 90

OpenCourseWare (OCW), 37, 90, 91

open educational resources (OER), 90–91, 101

Open Humanities Press, 77

open-source software, 90

Organization of American Historians, 76

Orr, David, 116

Our Underachieving Colleges (Bok), 97

Owens, Trevor, 49

Palgrave Pivot, 60

Paris Declaration on Open Education Resources (2012), 90–91

participatory learning, 99–100

The Path Forward: The Future of

Graduate Education in the United States (Commission on the Future of Graduate Education), 122

pedagogy. See teaching

peer review, 63, 74, 78, 133

peer-to-peer learning, 37

Pennapacker, William, 100

Perspectives on History, 57

Peterson, Nancy J., 164, 171–72

Pettegree, Andrew, 57

Ph.D. Completion and Attrition: Policies and Practices to Promote Student Success (Council of Graduate Schools), 130

PhD in the applied humanities model, 142, 143

“The PhD Octopus” (James), 131

Phillips, Amanda, 168

The Piracy Crusade: How the Music Industry’s War on Sharing Destroys Markets and Erodes Civil Liberties (Sinnreich), 78

place, 35–36

Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (Fitzpatrick), 63

PMC (formerly PubMed Central), 69–70

PMLA, 28

Pochoda, Philip, 51, 55, 60, 65, 133, 196n15

politicians, impact of on universities, 10

Posselt, Julie R., 124–25, 166

postdoctoral positions, 14, 122, 147

posthuman humanities scholar, the, 103–7

Postmedieval Forum, 74

Potter, Claire Bond, 57

Praxis Network, 157

Presner, Todd, 142

PressForward (website), 60, 64, 73

Princeton Shorts, 60

professionalization, 133, 161, 171–72

professors. See faculty

“Promoting Open Access in the Humanities” (Suber), 72

prostheses. See devices

proto-monographs. See dissertations

public, the, as audience for book, 3

publication. See scholarly communication

publications by graduate students, 147–48, 149

public goods archives, 43–44

public scholarship, 123–24, 138–39, 141

public universities, state withdrawal of support for, 7–8

“publish or perish,” 86

Punctum Books, 74, 77

quantification of scholarly productivity, 105–6

Rabkin, Eric, 99–100

race, 21, 117, 118, 126, 166, 168–69

“Radical Open Access in the Humanities” (Hall), 77

Ramsay, Stephen, 49

Rausing, Alexandra, 140

readers, new relationships with, 62–63, 138–39

reading, deep, 48, 89, 144, 145

reading in slow motion, 100

recruitment initiatives, 20

regional collaborations, 40

Rehberger, Dean, 105

Religion, Secularism, and Political Belonging project, 40

“Report of the MLA Task Force on Evaluating Scholarship for Tenure and Promotion” (MLA), 131, 133–34, 135, 149, 159

research universities

and archives, 43

expectations of faculty in, 85–86

hiring at, 148

and MOOCs, 95

report on, 9, 39, 195n40

Research Universities and the Future of America (National Research Council), 9, 39, 195n40

resources for gaining skills, 161–62

review processes, 63, 74, 78, 133

Rogers, Katina, 142, 163–64

Rotman, Brian, 89

Rumsey, Abby Smith, 56–57, 62

Sandvig, Christian, 50

Sayers, Jentery, 51, 62

Scalar, 60, 62, 183n20

scaling up of curriculum, 13

scholarly and professional associations

and dissertations, 133

and embargo periods, 76

and evaluative criteria, 64

faculty advocacy by, 28, 29

and open access, 73, 75, 76, 81, 90

reports from on job openings, 116–17

See also Modern Language Association (MLA)

scholarly communication

and the book, 57–59

and born-digital scholarship, 61–62

evaluation of, 63–65

hidden cost in closed publication system, 72

journal publications, 73–75

long-form book, 77–81

modes of open access to, 67–68

new forms of, 60–61

and relationships with readers, 62–63

and review processes, 63

short-form writing, 73

STEM journals’ publishing system, 68–71

terminology of, 55

tools and platforms for, 59–60

transitions in, 55–57, 65–66

See also dissertations

Scholarly Communication Institute, 56–57, 123

scholarly networks, 136–37, 159

scholars, posthuman, 103–7

scholarship, public, 123–24, 138–39, 141

Scholarship in Public: Knowledge Creation and Tenure Policy in the Engaged University (Ellison and Eatman), 123

sciences, the. See STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields

Scott, Rick, 12, 176n15

Scribd.com, 59

search committees, 148–49

Seattle Attic, 51

SED. See Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED)

Semantic Web, the, 51–52

seminars, 156–57

Shep, Sydney, 48–49

short-form writing

and dissertations, 140–41, 145–46, 147–48, 148–49, 151

open access in, 73

Siegel, Lee, 22

Simpson Center for the Humanities, 123, 158

Sinnreich, Arem, 78

Slave Biographies project, 47

Small Data, 46–47

“Socializing Future Professionals: Exploring the Matrix of Assessment” (Wittman and Abuan), 158

social media, 73, 83

Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), 41, 121, 124, 125, 129, 135, 142

Sousanis, Nick, 141–42

Southern Spaces, 74

SSHRC. See Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

Stanford, 25, 92, 122, 153

“Statement on Online Dissertation Embargoes” (Medieval Academy of America), 76

State of the Humanities, The: Higher Education 2015 (American Academy of Arts and Sciences), 26

STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) fields

call for open access in, 69–71, 186–87n31

costs of programs in, 26

and faculty pay, 14

jobs related to majors in, 27

journals in, 56, 68–71

MOOCs in, 92–93

political effects on, 10, 11

transnational institutes for advances in, 37

Stimpson, Catharine R., 156

Streeter, Thomas, 78

STRIDE (Strategies and Tactics for Recruiting to Improve Diversity and Excellence), 20

student loans, 8, 36, 118

students

demographics of, 88, 118, 121, 133

international, 7, 8

subjectivity of, 89

See also doctoral students; graduate students

Suber, Peter, 72, 79

suites of essays, 140–41, 151

Sullivan, Theresa, 95

Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), 113, 114, 116–17, 118, 168

Sweetman, Chuck, 157

teaching, 85–102

and career planning, 162

and casualization of academic labor force, 170

changes in, 85–87

changes in courses, 97–98, 156–60

and dissertations, 150

massive open online courses (MOOCs), 91–96

open access in, 90–97

vs research, 137

technologies, new

dismissal of, 17

and dissertations, 136

and subjectivity of students, 89

and value of higher education, 9–10

See also digital technologies

tenure-track positions

author’s personal experience with, 19

and dissertations, 86, 130, 133, 135, 149–50

and first book requirement, 76, 86, 146–47

and hiring, 148–49

and job market, 116, 120, 170, 171

See also non-tenure-track positions

theory, criticism of, 22, 23

thinking, materiality of, 104

This Is Not a Book (Liu), 57–58

Thomas, William G., III, 47

“times are good enough” for change, 5, 31–32

opportunities for change, 24–31

time-to-degree, 111, 114, 121–22, 153, 167, 170, 171

Tiwari, Bulbul, 138

Too Big to Know: Rethinking Knowledge Now That the Facts Aren’t the Facts, Experts Are Everywhere, and the Smartest Person in the Room is the Room (Weinberger), 104

“Toward a New Deal” (Nowviskie), 169

translations, and dissertations, 141

transnational campuses, 37–38

transnational collaborations, 39–40

Tri-national Summer School in American Studies, 39

Trio Series, 60

tuition costs, 8, 17, 26

undergraduate education

changes in, 97–100

community college system, 9, 25, 139

demographics of students in, 88

enrollments in, 24–25

expectations of faculty in, 13, 85–87

unionization, 29, 170

universities, distributed, 35–42

University Microfilms, 47, 132

University of Albany, 13

University of Arizona, 19

University of California, 8, 70, 122

University of Chicago Press, 60

University of Illinois, 97

University of Manitoba, 96

University of Massachusetts Press, 78

University of Michigan, 8, 17, 47, 157–58, 170

University of Minnesota Press, 78–79

University of North Carolina, 150

University of Pennsylvania, 93

University of the People, 36–37

University of Southern California, 60, 158

University of Toronto, 29

University of Virginia, 95, 123, 157

University of Washington, 123, 153, 158

University of Wisconsin, 29

utility, economic, 9–10, 12, 26, 165

Vaidhyananthan, Siva, 104

value, gauges of, 82

Versatile Ph.D. website, 163

Visconti, Amanda, 142

voice, scholarly, 137–39

Voosen, Paul, 11

wage discount, 21

Wall Street Journal, 22

Waters, Donald J., 46

Waters, Lindsay, 135

Watkins, Evan, 166

weight, of books, 58–59

Weinberger, David, 104

We Scholars (Damrosch), 130, 136–37

“What Dido Did, Satan Saw & O’Keeffe Painted” (Bauerlein), 22

“White Paper on the Future of the PhD in the Humanities” (Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada), 121, 124, 125, 129, 135, 142

Wickham, Chris, 75, 187n32

Williford, Christa, 48

Wittman, John, 158

women in the humanities, 18, 21, 126–27, 168

women’s studies, 19, 47

Women Who Rock Oral History Archive, 47

Woodrow Wilson Foundation, 122–23

Woodward, Kathleen, 9, 123, 141

workshop model, 142–43

WorldMap, 90

World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), 51

written assignments, in MOOCs, 94

Yale, 36

Yale-NUS (National University of Singapore) College, 37

Yale University Press, 78

Zhuo, Daisy, 32

Zotero, 45, 59, 90

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Knowledge Environments

Additional Information

ISBN
9780472121717
Related ISBN
9780472073047
MARC Record
OCLC
933516689
Pages
215-226
Launched on MUSE
2016-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC-ND
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