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Page numbers in italics indicate figures and tables. Aberbach, J. D., 23, 43 activist agenda: of G. W. Bush administration, 12, 68–69; institutional competence and, 70 administrative presidency: activist agenda of, 69; areas for future research, 155–59; G. W. Bush and, 14–16; congressional scrutiny of, 79; conventional wisdom of studies of, 3; definition of, 2; development of, 22–24; expectations of, 20, 21, 159; importance of trust and, 148–52; limitations on, 41; theoretical propositions of, 11; tools of, 9–10, 19 administrative state, 18–19 agencies: distrust between presidents and, 2–3, 13–14; selection of, 4–5. See also agency ideology; organizational effectiveness ; and specific agencies agency ideology: awareness of transition activities and, 136–37, 138–39, 139; direct and moderating impacts of, 101; impediments to transition and, 129–30, 130; intellectual capital capacity and, 77–78, 96, 109–10; measurement of, 93–94; transition preparation and, 141–42 agency theory and “control paradox,” 42 alternative generation and testing, 43 appointee-careerist relations: “black box” of, 13; dyadic, 47–55; institutional competence and, 70–72, 156; knowledge exchange and, 67; limitations of studies of, 72; in Obama administration, 157–58; politicization and, 66; responsiveness and, 17–18; significance of, 152–54; socially embedded trust in, 56–59; in transition preparation, 117–18, 125, 127–28, 128; trust in, 47–55, 150–51 appointees: confirmation delays for, 53–54, 78–80, 120–21, 124–25, 130; as critical institutional links, 18–20, 22; distrust between careerists and, ix–x, 2–4, 13–14, 41–42, 55; expectations of, 51–52, 56–57; institutional competence of, 109, 148; layering of, 31, 35, 71, 73, 156; number and jobs of, 9; relations between careerists and, 1–2; role of, 145; tenure of, 15, 54, 79. See also appointee-careerist relations; appointment strategy appointee trust index, 127–28, 128 appointee vacancies. See vacancies Appointee Vacancy Act of 1998, 62, 79 appointment strategy: of G. W. Bush, 36, 37; effectiveness of, 10–12; loyalty-first standards of, 153; policy priorities and, 9–10; of Reagan, 25; responsiveness and, 15–16, 20, 22; in second term, 79–80; theoretical and empirical paths to performance from, 12; uses of, 38. See also appointees; politicization appropriateness, logic of, 49–50, 58 authority of leadership, 146 Axelrod, R., 53 Barnard, Chester, 44, 104, 146 Barnes, Fred, 33 benevolence, perceptions of, 50–51 bivariate method of analysis, 97 “black box” of integration, 114 Bolton, Josh, 35 Bonosaro, Charles, 158 Brehm, J., 47, 76, 82, 87, 97, 152 Brewer, G. A., 164n33 Brookings Institution, 156 bureaucratic action, Clinton administration stance toward, 29 bureaucratic shirking of presidential authority, 38 Burt, R., 58 Bush (George H. W.) administration, 27–28 Bush (George W.) administration: activist agenda of, 12, 68–69; administrative Index 186 Index Bush (George W.) administration (cont.) presidency and, 14–16; appointee layering strategy of, 73; appointment strategy of, 36, 37; “big government conservatism” of, 17, 31–36, 38, 39, 69; centralized decision-­ making in, 112; as conservative, 93; intellectual capital capacity development and, 146; jigsaw puzzle management by, 118, 119, 139–41, 153–54; loyalty-first standards of, 153; management style of, 148–49; Program Assessment and Rating Tool, 163–64n25. See also transition preparation calculative trust, 115–16. See also encapsulated interest Card, Andrew, 35 career executives/careerists: Clinton administration and, 28–29; distrust between appointees and, ix–x, 2–4, 13–14, 41–42, 55; expertise of, x, 18, 23–24, 57, 124–25; hostility toward, 35–36; in jigsaw puzzle management approach, 16–17; policy implementation and, 156–57; policy interests of, 23–24; policy priorities and, 10, 15–16; relations between appointees and, 1–2; responsibilities of, 77; responsiveness of, 23; tenure of, 133–34. See also appointee-careerist relations; Senior Executive Service (SES) personnel Carroll, James D., 149, 158 Carter, Jimmy, 22 Center for American Progress, 52 centralization strategy: of G. W. Bush administration , 34–35; motivation toward, 42–43; politicization and, 19–20 Chang, K., 122 Cho, Y. J., 104 Chun, Y. H., 85 Civil Service Reform Act (CSRA) of 1978, 22–23, 24, 26 Clinton, J. D., 93, 129 Clinton administration, 28–31 cognate fields, findings from, 10, 47–48, 62, 72, 143, 155 cognitive politicization, effects of, 147. See also stratified trust collective knowledge, 60 compartmentalization of politics and administration, 49–50 confirmation delays: impacts of, 53–54, 78–80; presidential transitions and, 120–21, 124–25, 130 constraints on administrative presidency, 12–13 “contingently cooperative” strategy...

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Additional Information

ISBN
9781421418506
Related ISBN
9781421418490
MARC Record
OCLC
922889469
Pages
176
Launched on MUSE
2015-10-13
Language
English
Open Access
No
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