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The Politics of the Provisional

Art and Ephemera in Revolutionary France

By Richard Taws

In revolutionary France the life of things could not be assured. War, shortage of materials, and frequent changes in political authority meant that few large-scale artworks or permanent monuments to the Revolution’s memory were completed. On the contrary, visual practice in revolutionary France was characterized by the production and circulation of a range of transitional, provisional, ephemeral, and half-made images and objects, from printed paper money, passports, and almanacs to temporary festival installations and relics of the demolished Bastille. Addressing this mass of images conventionally ignored in art history, The Politics of the Provisional contends that they were at the heart of debates on the nature of political authenticity and historical memory during the French Revolution. Thinking about material durability, this book suggests, was one of the key ways in which revolutionaries conceptualized duration, and it was crucial to how they imagined the Revolution’s transformative role in history. The Politics of the Provisional is the first book in the Art History Publication Initiative (AHPI), a collaborative grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Thanks to the AHPI grant, this book will be available in the following e-book editions: Kindle, Nook Study, Google Editions, ebrary, EBSCO, Project MUSE, and JSTOR.

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Restoration: Studies in English Literary Culture, 1660-1700

Vol. 32 (2008) through current issue

Restoration publishes new work in the field of English letters, arts, culture and society from 1660-1700. The journal appears biannually. Each issue contains scholarly essays; scholarly book reviews; and a unique, comprehensive and annotated bibliography of recent scholarship. We welcome submissions using a variety of methodologies and from diverse points of view that shed new light on Restoration studies.

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The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats

Vol. 34 (2002-2003) through current issue

Since 1968, The Scriblerian and the Kit-Cats has offered imaginative, insightful, and concise reviews of current critical discussion of the English literature of the late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-centuries. The bi-annual journal offers knowledgeable responses to recent criticism of late-seventeenth and early eighteenth-century literary figures (Addison, Behn, Congreve, Dennis, Dryden, Finch, Garth, Gay, Haywood, Hogarth, Mandeville, Montagu, Parnell, Pilkington, Pope, Rochester, Rowe, Rymer, Settle, Shaftesbury, Steele, Swift, Thomson, Toland, and Vanbrugh, as well as the five early novelists (Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Smollett, and Sterne). Notes on the history and culture of the period and bibliographical commentary often accompany the Scriblerian's comprehensive article and book reviews.

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Severo Sarduy and the Neo-Baroque Image of Thought in the Visual Arts

by Rolando Pérez

Severo Sarduy never enjoyed the same level of notoriety as did other Latin American writers like García Márquez and Vargas-Llosa, and his compatriot, Cabrera-Infante. On the other hand, he never lacked for excellent critical interpretations of his work from critics like Roberto González Echevarría, René Prieto, Gustavo Guerrero, and other reputable scholars. Missing, however, from what is otherwise an impressive body of critical commentary, is a study of the importance of painting and architecture, firstly, to his theory, and secondly, to his creative work. In order to fill this lacuna in Sarduy studies, Rolando Pérez’s book undertakes a critical approach to Sarduy’s essays—Barroco, Escrito sobre un cuerpo, “Barroco y neobarroco,” and La simulación—from the stand point of art history. Often overlooked in Sarduy studies is the fact that the twenty-three-year-old Sarduy left Cuba for Paris in 1961 to study not literature but art history, earning the equivalent of a Master’s Degree from the École du Louvre with a thesis on Roman art. And yet it was the art of the Italian Renaissance (e.g., the paintings as well as the brilliant and numerous treatises on linear perspective produced from the 15th to the 16th century) and what Sarduy called the Italian, Spanish, and colonial Baroque or “neo-baroque” visually based aesthetic that interested him and to which he dedicated so many pages. In short, no book on Sarduy until now has traced the multifaceted art historical background that informed the work of this challenging and exciting writer. And though Severo Sarduy and the Neo-Baroque Image of Thought in the Visual Arts is far from being an introduction, it will be a book that many a critic of Sarduy and the Latin American “baroque” will consult in years to come.

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Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture

Vol. 20 (1991) through current issue

Published by the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS), Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture is an annual volume that features significantly revised versions of outstanding papers read at national and regional conferences of ASECS and its affiliates. Committed to representing ASECS's wide range of disciplinary interests, Studies in Eighteenth-Century Culture particularly selects essays that reflect new and highly promising directions of research in the field.

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