University of Texas Press

The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere

Published by: University of Texas Press

Go

Browse Books in Series:

The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere

1

Results 1-9 of 9

:
restricted access This search result is for a Book

Account of the Fables and Rites of the Incas

By Cristóbal de Molina

Based on eyewitness accounts of rituals conducted at the height of Inca rule, this is a key document that provides an unparalleled account of the prayers and religious celebrations of the Inca in a context of rapidly changing cultural practices.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Adoring the Saints

Fiestas in Central Mexico

By Yolanda Lastra, Dina Sherzer, and Joel Sherzer

Mexico is famous for spectacular fiestas that embody its heart and soul. An expression of the cult of the saint, patron saint fiestas are the centerpiece of Mexican popular religion and of great importance to the lives and cultures of people and communities. These fiestas have their own language, objects, belief systems, and practices. They link Mexico’s past and present, its indigenous and European populations, and its local and global relations. This work provides a comprehensive study of two intimately linked patron saint fiestas in the state of Guanajuato, near San Miguel de Allende—the fiesta of the village of Cruz del Palmar and that of the town of San Luis de la Paz. These two fiestas are related to one another in very special ways involving both religious practices and their respective pre-Hispanic origins. A mixture of secular and sacred, patron saint fiestas are multi-day affairs that include many events, ritual specialists, and performers, with the participation of the entire community. Fiestas take place in order to honor the saints, and they are the occasion for religious ceremonies, processions, musical performances, dances, and dance dramas. They feature spectacular costumes, enormous puppets, masked and cross-dressed individuals, dazzling fireworks, rodeos, food stands, competitions, and public dances. By encompassing all of these events and performances, this work displays the essence of Mexico, a lens through which this country’s complex history, religion, ethnic mix, traditions, and magic can be viewed.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Ballads of the Lords of New Spain

The Codex Romances de los Señores de la Nueva España

Transcribed and translated from the Nahuatl by John Bierhorst

Compiled in 1582, Ballads of the Lords of New Spain is one of the two principal sources of Nahuatl song, as well as a poetical window into the mindset of the Aztec people some sixty years after the conquest of Mexico. Presented as a cancionero, or anthology, in the mode of New Spain, the ballads show a reordering—but not an abandonment—of classic Aztec values. In the careful reading of John Bierhorst, the ballads reveal in no uncertain terms the pre-conquest Aztec belief in the warrior’s paradise and in the virtue of sacrifice. This volume contains an exact transcription of the thirty-six Nahuatl song texts, accompanied by authoritative English translations. Bierhorst includes all the numerals (which give interpretive clues) in the Nahuatl texts and also differentiates the text from scribal glosses. His translations are thoroughly annotated to help readers understand the imagery and allusions in the texts. The volume also includes a helpful introduction and a larger essay, “On the Translation of Aztec Poetry,” that discusses many relevant historical and literary issues. In Bierhorst’s expert translation and interpretation, Ballads of the Lords of New Spain emerges as a song of resistance by a conquered people and the recollection of a glorious past.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Chiefs, Scribes, and Ethnographers

Kuna Culture from Inside and Out

By James Howe

The Kuna of Panama, today one of the best known indigenous peoples of Latin America, moved over the course of the twentieth century from orality and isolation towards literacy and an active engagement with the nation and the world. Recognizing the fascination their culture has held for many outsiders, Kuna intellectuals and villagers have collaborated actively with foreign anthropologists to counter anti-Indian prejudice with positive accounts of their people, thus becoming the agents as well as subjects of ethnography. One team of chiefs and secretaries, in particular, independently produced a series of historical and cultural texts, later published in Sweden, that today still constitute the foundation of Kuna ethnography. As a study of the political uses of literacy, of western representation and indigenous counter-representation, and of the ambivalent inter-cultural dialogue at the heart of ethnography, Chiefs, Scribes, and Ethnographers addresses key issues in contemporary anthropology. It is the story of an extended ethnographic encounter, one involving hundreds of active participants on both sides and continuing today.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Discovering the Olmecs

An Unconventional History

By David C. Grove

This lively history of seven decades of archaeological exploration in the Olmec region of Mexico tells the fascinating backstory of how archaeological discoveries are made while offering an exceptional overview of this ancient civilization.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

From the Mines to the Streets

A Bolivian Activist’s Life

By Benjamin Kohl and Linda C. Farthing, with Félix Muruchi

From the Mines to the Streets draws on the life of Félix Muruchi to depict the greater forces at play in Bolivia and elsewhere in South America during the last half of the twentieth century. It traces Félix from his birth in an indigenous family in 1946, just after the abolition of bonded labor, through the next sixty years of Bolivia’s turbulent history. As a teenager, Félix followed his father into the tin mines before serving a compulsory year in the military, during which he witnessed the 1964 coup d’état that plunged the country into eighteen years of military rule. He returned to work in the mines, where he quickly rose to become a union leader. The reward for his activism was imprisonment, torture, and exile. After he came home, he participated actively in the struggles against neoliberal governments, which led in 2006—the year of his sixtieth birthday—to the inauguration of Evo Morales as Bolivia’s first indigenous president. The authors weave Muruchi’s compelling recollections with contextual commentary that elucidates Bolivian history. The combination of an unforgettable life story and in-depth text boxes makes this a gripping, effective account, destined to become a classic sourcebook.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Reconsidering Olmec Visual Culture

The Unborn, Women, and Creation

By Carolyn E. Tate

This groundbreaking study of gestational imagery on ancient Olmec monuments and objects brings to light Mesoamerica’s earliest creation narrative and traces its evolution into one of the enduring themes of Mesoamerican ritual life and art.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

Ritual Violence in the Ancient Andes

Reconstructing Sacrifice on the North Coast of Peru

Edited by Haagen D. Klaus and J. Marla Toyne

The first comprehensive synthesis of a major topic in Andean archaeology, this volume reconstructs the complex and situational motivations underlying ritual killing and the broader range of pre- and post-killing rites that were integral to ancient liturgies of violence.

restricted access This search result is for a Book

The Worlds of the Moche on the North Coast of Peru

By Elizabeth P. Benson

One of the world’s leading authorities presents a major overview of the Moche, one of pre-Columbian America’s greatest civilizations, renowned for its monumental architecture, metalwork, ceramics, and textiles.

1

Results 1-9 of 9

:

Return to Browse All Series on Project MUSE

Series

The William and Bettye Nowlin Series in Art, History, and Culture of the Western Hemisphere

Content Type

  • (9)

Access

  • You have access to this content
  • Free sample
  • Open Access
  • Restricted Access