The University of North Carolina Press

John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

Series Editors: Waldo E. Martin Jr., University of California, Berkeley, and Patricia Sullivan, University of South Carolina

Published by: The University of North Carolina Press

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John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

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Crossroads at Clarksdale

The Black Freedom Struggle in the Mississippi Delta after World War II

Fran├žoise N. Hamlin

Weaving national narratives from stories of the daily lives and familiar places of local residents, Fran├žoise Hamlin chronicles the slow struggle for black freedom through the history of Clarksdale, Mississippi. Hamlin paints a full picture of the town over fifty years, recognizing the accomplishments of its diverse African American community and strong NAACP branch, and examining the extreme brutality of entrenched power there. The Clarksdale story defies triumphant narratives of dramatic change, and presents instead a layered, contentious, untidy, and often disappointingly unresolved civil rights movement.

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A Faithful Account of the Race

African American Historical Writing in Nineteenth-Century America

Stephen G. Hall

The civil rights and black power movements expanded popular awareness of the history and culture of African Americans. But, as Stephen Hall observes, African American authors, intellectuals, ministers, and abolitionists had been writing the history of the black experience since the 1800s. With this book, Hall recaptures and reconstructs a rich but largely overlooked tradition of historical writing by African Americans.

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First Fruits of Freedom

The Migration of Former Slaves and Their Search for Equality in Worcester, Massachusetts, 1862-1900

Janette Thomas Greenwood

Greenwood chronicles one of the first collective migrations of blacks from the South to the North during and after the Civil War. She describes a network forged between Worcester County, Mass., and eastern North Carolina as a result of Worcester regiments taking control of northeastern N.C. during the war. White soldiers from Worcester, a hotbed of abolitionism, protected refugee slaves, set up schools for them, and led them north at war's end. Migrants established a small black community in Worcester with a distinctive southern flavor, but were generally disappointed in their hopes for full-fledged citizenship.

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