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Since the advent of generative phonology, linguists have turned their attention to elaborating or constraining the 'standard theory'. The present volume, the outgrowth of a conference held at Indiana University in the fall of 1977, engages in dialogue the leading proponents of some of the most stimulating current approaches to phonological theory and makes possible a serious and systematic comparison of their views. Some of the larger questions taken up in this volume are: What specific issues or problems have given rise to each new theoretical approach to force a depature from 'standard theory'? How do the new approaches differ from one another? What aspects of these differences are formal/empirical? Are there any bases for judging one theory or approach to be superior to another?

Table of Contents

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  1. Cover
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  1. Blank Page
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  1. Half Title Page
  2. p. i
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  1. Contributors
  2. p. ii
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  1. Title Page
  2. p. iii
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  1. Copyright
  2. p. iv
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  1. Dedication
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introducion
  2. Daniel A. Dinnsen
  3. pp. ix-xiv
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  1. Part 1 Theoretical Approaches
  2. p. 1
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  1. 1. On the Subsequent Development of the ‘Standard Theory’ in Phonology
  2. Stephen R. Anderson
  3. pp. 2-30
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  1. 2. Atomic Phonology
  2. Daniel A. Dinnsen
  3. pp. 31-49
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  1. 3. Functionally-constrained Phonology
  2. Kathleen Houlihan and Gregory K. Iverson
  3. pp. 50-73
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  1. 4. Equational Rules and Rule Functions in Phonology
  2. Gerald A. Sanders
  3. pp. 74-105
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  1. 5. Substantive Principles in Natural Generative Phonology
  2. Joan B. Hooper
  3. pp. 106-125
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  1. 6. The Study of Natural Phonology
  2. Patricia Jane Donegan and David Stampe
  3. pp. 126-173
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  1. 7. The Phonological Component as a Parsing Device
  2. William R. Leben
  3. pp. 174-201
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  1. 8. The Aims of Autosegmental Phonology
  2. John Goldsmith
  3. pp. 202-222
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  1. 9. Siddha and Asiddha in Pāṇinian Phonology
  2. S. D. Joshi and Paul Kiparsky
  3. pp. 223-250
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  1. Part 2 Review Article
  2. p. 251
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  1. 10. How Different Are They?
  2. Fred W. Householder
  3. pp. 252-264
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  1. Part 3 Remarks and Replies
  2. p. 265
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  1. 11. On Arguing about Phonological Theories
  2. Fred R. Eckman
  3. pp. 266-271
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  1. 12. On the Alleged Correlation of Markedness and Rule-function
  2. Jonathan Derek Kaye
  3. pp. 272-280
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  1. 13. Some Observations on "Substantive Principles in Natural Generative Phonology"
  2. James W. Harris
  3. pp. 281-293
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  1. 14. Comments
  2. James D. McCawley
  3. pp. 294-302
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  1. 15. Nonsegmental Phonology
  2. Sanjord A. Schane
  3. pp. 303-309
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  1. 16. Remarks on Markedness
  2. Linda R. Waugh
  3. pp. 310-316
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 317-335
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