In this Book

summary

This provocative collection of essays reveals the passionate voice of a Native American feminist intellectual. Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, a poet and literary scholar, grapples with issues she encountered as a Native American in academia. She asks questions of critical importance to tribal people:  who is telling their stories, where does cultural authority lie, and most important, how is it possible to develop an authentic tribal literary voice within the academic community?
    In the title essay, “Why I Can’t Read Wallace Stegner,” Cook-Lynn objects to Stegner’s portrayal of the American West in his fiction, contending that no other author has been more successful in serving the interests of the nation’s fantasy about itself. When Stegner writes that “Western history sort of stopped at 1890,” and when he claims the American West as his native land, Cook-Lynn argues, he negates the whole past, present, and future of the native peoples of the continent. Her other essays include discussion of such Native American writers as Michael Dorris, Ray Young Bear, and N. Scott Momaday; the importance of a tribal voice in academia, the risks to American Indian women in current law practices, the future of Indian Nationalism, and the defense of the land.
    Cook-Lynn emphasizes that her essays move beyond the narrowly autobiographical, not just about gender and power, not just focused on multiculturalism and diversity, but are about intellectual and political issues that engage readers and writers in Native American studies. Studying the “Indian,” Cook-Lynn reminds us, is not just an academic exercise but a matter of survival for the lifeways of tribal peoples. Her goal in these essays is to open conversations that can make tribal life and academic life more responsive to one another.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. ix-xi
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Part One: Thoughts on the Art of Reviewing Books
  2. pp. 3-6
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  1. 1. Wounded Knee, 1973
  2. pp. 7-10
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  1. 2. The Broken Cord
  2. pp. 11-16
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  1. 3. Black Eagle Child
  2. pp. 17-20
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  1. 4. Black Hills, White Justice
  2. pp. 21-26
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  1. Part Two: Dispossession
  2. p. 27
  1. 5. Why I Can’t Read Wallace Stegner
  2. pp. 29-40
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  1. 6. A Centennial Minute from Indian Country; or Lessons in Christianizing the Aboriginal Peoples of America from the Example of Bishop William Hobart Hare
  2. pp. 41-60
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  1. Part Three: Who Will Tell The Stories?
  2. p. 61
  1. 7. The Relationship of a Writer to the Past: Art, a Literary Principle, and the Need to Narrate
  2. pp. 63-77
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  1. 8. The American Indian Fiction Writers: Cosmopolitanism, Nationalism, the Third World, and First Nation Sovereignty
  2. pp. 78-96
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  1. Part Four: Women's Lives
  2. p. 97
  1. 9. The American Indian Woman in the Ivory Tower
  2. pp. 99-109
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  1. 10. The Big Pipe Case
  2. pp. 110-128
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  1. Part Five: The Last Word
  2. pp. 129-130
  1. 11. How Scholarship Comes to Be Relevant, or Dumbarton Oaks Is Fifty Years Old
  2. pp. 131-135
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  1. 12. America’s Oldest Racism: The Roots of Inequality
  2. pp. 136-141
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  1. 13. End of the Failed Metaphor
  2. pp. 142-152
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 153-156
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  1. Selected Bibliography
  2. pp. 157-158
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780299151430
Related ISBN
9780299151447
MARC Record
OCLC
835458345
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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