In this Book

summary

During the Ming-Qing transition (roughly from the 1570s to the 1680s), literati-officials in China employed public forms of writing, art, and social spectacle to present positive moral images of themselves and negative images of their rivals. The rise of print culture, the dynastic change, and the proliferating approaches to Confucian moral cultivation together gave shape to this new political culture. Confucian Image Politics considers the moral images of officials—as fathers, sons, husbands, and friends—circulated in a variety of media inside and outside the court. It shows how power negotiations took place through participants’ invocations of Confucian ethical ideals in political attacks, self-expression, self-defense, discussion of politically sensitive issues, and literati community rebuilding after the dynastic change. This first book-length study of early modern Chinese politics from the perspective of critical men’s history shows how images—the Donglin official, the Fushe scholar, the turncoat figure—were created, circulated, and contested to serve political purposes.

The open access publication of this book was made possible by a grant from the James P. Geiss and Margaret Y. Hsu Foundation.

Table of Contents

Download EPUB Download Full EPUB
  1. Cover
  2. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Half Title Page
  2. p. i
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Title Page
  2. p. iii
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Copyright
  2. p. iv
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Dedication
  2. pp. v-vi
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Ming-Qing Reign Periods
  2. pp. xv-xvi
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-23
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Part I. The Late Ming
  2. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 1. Lists, Literature, and the Imagined Community of Factionalists: The Donglin
  2. pp. 27-68
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 2. Displaying Sincerity: The Fushe
  2. pp. 69-101
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 3. A Zhongxiao Celebrity: Huang Daozhou (1585–1646)
  2. pp. 102-128
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Interlude: A Moral Tale of Two Cities, 1644–1645: Beijing and Nanjing
  2. pp. 129-153
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Part II. The Early Qing
  2. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 4. Moralizing, the Qing Way
  2. pp. 157-185
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. 5. Conquest, Continuity, and the Loyal Turncoat
  2. pp. 186-211
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Conclusion
  2. pp. 213-220
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Glossary
  2. pp. 221-228
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. List of Abbreviations
  2. pp. 229-230
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Notes
  2. pp. 231-271
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 273-297
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
  1. Index
  2. pp. 299-306
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.