In this Book

summary
Just a decade after the first printing press arrived in Honolulu in 1820, American Protestant missionaries produced the first newspaper in the islands. More than a thousand daily, weekly, or monthly papers in nine different languages have appeared since then. Today they are often considered a secondary source of information, but in their heyday Hawai‘i’s newspapers formed one of the most diversified, vigorous, and influential presses in the world. In this original and timely work, Helen Geracimos Chapin charts the role Hawai‘i’s newspapers played in shaping major historic events in the islands and how the rise of the newspaper abetted the rise of American influence in Hawai‘i. Shaping History is based on a wide selection of written and oral sources, including extensive interviews with journalists and others working in the newspaper industry. Students of journalism and Hawaiian history will find this comprehensive history of Hawai‘i’s newspapers especially valuable.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Frontmatter
  2. restricted access Download |
  1. Contents
  2. pp. VII-IX
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. XI-XIII
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-11
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part I. “To Exhibit Truth in an Attractive Form”: An Establishment Press Arrives—1834–1850
  1. 1. Ka Lama: “The Light” Is Brought to Hawai‘i
  2. pp. 15-18
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 2. The Solemn Responsibility of Dissent
  2. pp. 19-22
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 3. The Polynesian: In the Service of America and the Kingdom
  2. pp. 23-28
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 4. The English Flag and the English Language
  2. pp. 29-31
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 5. God Gives Way to Mammon: The Mahele of 1848
  2. pp. 32-38
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part II. “Fiery Polemic Contests”for the Public’s Support—1850–1887
  1. 6. "The Honolulu Times" Welcomes the City of Honolulu
  2. pp. 41-45
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 7. The Chinese Arrive
  2. pp. 46-47
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 8. A Prophet Without Profit: FornanderTopples Judd
  2. pp. 48-52
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 9. "The Advertiser" Enters History
  2. pp. 53-58
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 10. A Hawaiian Nationalist Press Is Born
  2. pp. 59-62
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 11. “A New Era Has Dawned”: Sugar Is King
  2. pp. 63-67
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 12. The Politics of Health
  2. pp. 68-71
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part III. Nationalists versus the Oligarchy: An Uneven Battle—1887–1899
  1. 13. A Pan-Pacific Dream
  2. pp. 75-83
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 14. Robert Wilcox, “the Napoleon of Printers’ Lane”
  2. pp. 84-92
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 15. Revolution and the Suppression of Freedom of Speech
  2. pp. 93-104
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 16. The Republic Burns Down Chinatown
  2. pp. 105-110
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part IV. “Here to Stay”: A U.S. Territory—1900–1941
  1. 17. Annexation and the Pacific Cable
  2. pp. 113-117
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 18. The 1909 Strike and the Japanese Language Press
  2. pp. 118-125
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 19. Respected Residents Become the Enemy: World War I and the Germans
  2. pp. 126-130
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 20. Suppressing the News and Contributing to a Massacre
  2. pp. 131-139
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 21. The Three Rs—Reading, ’Riting, and Racism
  2. pp. 140-147
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 22. “Reclaiming” Waikîkî for the “Aloha Spirit”
  2. pp. 148-151
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 23. Getting Away With Murder: The Massie Case
  2. pp. 152-158
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 24. Hilo’s “Bloody Monday”: The Tribune-Herald and the Voice of Labor
  2. pp. 159-167
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part V. “Passed for Publication”—1941–1945
  1. 25. A Wartime Press and the Paradox of Censorship for Freedom
  2. pp. 171-183
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 26. AJAs: American Patriots
  2. pp. 184-189
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part VI. The March toward Statehood—the 1940s and 1950s
  1. 27. “Dear Joe”: Lorrin Thurston Writes to Joe—Stalin or Farrington?
  2. pp. 193-197
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 28. "The Honolulu Record" and the Art of Muckraking
  2. pp. 198-203
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 29. The Hawaii Seven: Journalists in Jeopardy
  2. pp. 204-211
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 30. "Ka Leo" Reports on the "Golden Rule"
  2. pp. 212-219
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 31. Watch Them Grow: Tourism and Suburban O‘ahu
  2. pp. 220-229
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 32. Statehood and the Star-Bulletin
  2. pp. 230-238
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part VII. The Turbulent 1960s
  1. 33. The Business of Newspapers
  2. p. 241
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 34. The Popular Columnist
  2. pp. 251-255
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 35. Sports and Journalism: “The Social Fabric”
  2. pp. 256-261
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 36. Above Ground: The Battle for Diamond Head
  2. pp. 262-268
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 37. Underground: The Battle for Hawai‘i’s Soul
  2. pp. 269-281
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 38. Women in the News: From Society to Social Causes
  2. pp. 282-294
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Part VIII. From Satellite City Halls to a Satellite Universe—1970–1976
  1. 39. Memories of Maui
  2. pp. 297-309
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 40. Corporate Economics and Chain Papers
  2. pp. 310-316
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 41. Fighting the Newspapers to a Draw: Frank Fasi and the Dailies
  2. pp. 317-325
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 42. The Public Opinion Poll
  2. pp. 326-331
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 43. Anger and Wit: The Political Cartoon
  2. pp. 332-337
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. 44. Hawaiian Sovereignty and a Satellite Universe, 1976
  2. pp. 338-345
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 347-371
  3. restricted access Download |
  1. Index
  2. pp. 373-386
  3. restricted access Download |

Additional Information

ISBN
9780824864279
Related ISBN
9780824817183
MARC Record
OCLC
45729341
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.