In this Book

summary
This is a study of Texas women and the conflicting images and myths that have grown up about them. Texas women were activists. They ran ranches, branded cattle, lobbied the halls of the Texas Legislature, led strikes, ran hospitals, preached the gospel, got elected to public office and built major institutions. Women brought civilized life to hundreds of Texas towns by organizing libraries, museums, parks, symphony orchestras, Sunday schools, literary clubs and charitable organizations. Contents: Sister María de Agreda, the mysterious Indian Angelina, the "Yellow Rose of Texas" Emily Morgan, the "Weeping Woman" La Llorona, Belle Starr, the "Crying Woman" of San Patricio, the "Goddess of Liberty" statue on the state capitol, Sally Scull, Sophia Porter, Elise Waerenskjold, Adah Isaacs Menken, Elisabet Ney, Mollie Bailey, Martha White McWhirter, "Aunt Dicy," Ma Ferguson, Bonnie Parker, Janis Jopkin, Electra Waggoner, "Babe" Didrikson, and such groups as the El Paso madams, honky tonk angels, and the Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
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  1. Title Page
  2. p. ii
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  1. Copyright Page
  2. p. iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-xii
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  1. Introduction/Women in Texas History and Legend
  2. pp. 1-6
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  1. Early Days
  2. p. 7
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  1. María de Agreda: The Lady in Blue
  2. pp. 8-14
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  1. Angelina
  2. pp. 15-19
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  1. Emily Morgan: Yellow Rose of Texas
  2. pp. 20-29
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  1. The Weeping Woman: La Llorona
  2. pp. 30-36
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  1. Settlers
  2. p. 37
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  1. Belle Starr: The Bandit Queen of Dallas
  2. pp. 38-49
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  1. The Ghost of Chipita: The Crying Woman of San Patricio
  2. pp. 50-56
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  1. The Capitol's Lady
  2. pp. 57-58
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  1. Two Sixshooters and a Sunbonnet: The Story of Sally Skull
  2. pp. 59-71
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  1. Sophia Porter: Texas’ Own Scarlett O'Hara
  2. pp. 72-78
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  1. Elise Waerenskjold: A Modern on the Prairie
  2. pp. 79-82
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  1. Texas Gets Culture
  2. p. 83
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  1. Adah Isaacs Menken: From Texas to Paris
  2. pp. 84-93
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  1. Elisabet Ney: Texas’ First Lady of Sculpture
  2. pp. 94-105
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  1. Mollie Bailey: Circus Entrepreneur
  2. pp. 106-114
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  1. Martha White McWhirter and the Belton Sanctificationists
  2. pp. 115-122
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  1. Aunt Dicy: Legendary Black Lady
  2. pp. 123-131
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  1. El Paso Madams
  2. pp. 132-141
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  1. Early 20th Century
  2. pp. 142-143
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  1. Pardon Me, Governor Ferguson
  2. pp. 144-161
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  1. “Tell Them I Don't Smoke Cigars”: The Story of Bonnie Parker
  2. pp. 162-172
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  1. Glamor Girl Called Electra
  2. pp. 173-174
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  1. The Babe
  2. pp. 175-182
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  1. Modern Times
  2. p. 183
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  1. Janis and the Austin Scene
  2. pp. 184-193
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  1. Legends in their Own Time: The Dallas Cowboy Cheerleaders
  2. pp. 194-201
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  1. Honky Tonk Angels
  2. pp. 202-210
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  1. Woman as Victim in Modern Folklore
  2. pp. 211-216
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  1. Mrs. Bailey and the Bears
  2. pp. 217-218
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 219-222
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  1. Illustration Credits
  2. pp. 223-224
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 225-237
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  1. National Endowment for the Humanities Funding Information
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  1. Back Cover
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780929398754
Related ISBN
9780929398754
MARC Record
OCLC
1142329149
Launched on MUSE
2019-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
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