In this Book

summary
In 1999 the Texas Folklore Society looked back on its ninety years and saw that it was still strong. It has met annually since 1909, except when interrupted by wartime. It has collected, presented, and preserved more folklore than any other similar society in the United States. It has amassed a list of publications in Texas folklore that compare favorably with collections throughout the United States. It has brought to Texas and sent out from Texas some of the leading folklorists of the nation. And large numbers of the Society's members continue to gather annually to honor and enjoy the traditions of Texas. Volume III of its history begins with the move from Wilson Hudson’s editorship at the University of Texas to F. E. Abernethy’s editorship at Stephen F. Austin State University: “We moved during the burnt-out end of August, Wilson and I . . . We sweated and cussed some as we packed the Society's materials in cardboard boxes and carried them out to the station wagon parked behind Parlin Hall. We took down the pictures of Lomax and Payne and Thompson and some Cisneros sketches . . . Frank Dobie's old felt hat with a turkey feather in the band was sitting on a filing cabinet, so we put it in. Very gently we loaded a box of Mody's paisanos, five or six of them . . . And the Society's publications . . . that stretched back to Stith Thompson's Volume I in 1916 and make up our umbilicus, the visible chain of the Society's being, that makes us all a part of it from its inception in 1909.”

Table of Contents

  1. Cover Page
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  1. The Texas Folklore Society, 1971–2000, Information
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  1. Title Page
  2. pp. i-iii
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  1. Copyright Page
  2. p. iv
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  1. Contents
  2. p. v
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  1. Image
  2. p. vi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Image
  2. p. ix
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  1. Image
  2. p. x
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  1. Images
  2. pp. 1-2
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  1. The Story in the Previous Volumes—
  2. pp. 3-4
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  1. I. Getting Started in a New Land—The Encino Years: 1971–1978
  2. pp. 5-6
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  1. Chapter 1 Ralph H. Houston (1910–1989)
  2. pp. 7-10
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  1. Chapter 2 Bessie Pearce (1915–1997)
  2. pp. 11-16
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  1. Chapter 3 Sidney S. Cox (1910–1980)
  2. pp. 17-22
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  1. Chapter 4 Orlan L. Sawey (1920–1989)
  2. pp. 23-26
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  1. Chapter 5 Ernest B. Speck (1917–1995)
  2. pp. 27-29
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  1. Chapter 6 Joyce Gibson Roach
  2. pp. 30-32
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  1. Chapter 7 William H. Hardin
  2. pp. 33-35
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  1. Chapter 8 Ernestine Sewell Linck
  2. pp. 36-68
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  1. II. E-Heart and SMU Press: 1979–1989
  2. pp. 69-70
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  1. Chapter 9 James M. Day
  2. pp. 71-74
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  1. Chapter 10 Robert J. (Jack) Duncan
  2. pp. 75-77
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  1. Chapter 11 Lawrence R. Clayton
  2. pp. 78-80
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  1. Chapter 12 Charles B. Martin
  2. pp. 81-84
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  1. Chapter 13 Sylvia Grider
  2. pp. 85-87
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  1. Chapter 14 Charles E. Linck
  2. pp. 88-90
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  1. Chapter 15 Joe S. Graham
  2. pp. 91-93
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  1. Chapter 16 Melvin R. Mason
  2. pp. 94-97
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  1. Chapter 17 Jim Harris
  2. pp. 98-101
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  1. Chapter 18 Lou Halsell Rodenberger
  2. pp. 102-103
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  1. Chapter 19 Sarah L. Greene
  2. pp. 104-136
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  1. III. University of North Texas Press: 1990–2000
  2. pp. 137-138
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  1. Chapter 20 Al Lowman
  2. pp. 139-143
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  1. Chapter 21 Kenneth W. Davis
  2. pp. 144-146
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  1. Chapter 22 Jeri Tanner (1926–1998)
  2. pp. 147-150
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  1. Chapter 23 Dick Heaberlin
  2. pp. 151-154
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  1. Chapter 24 Mildred Boren Sentell
  2. pp. 155-157
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  1. Chapter 25 Faye Leeper
  2. pp. 158-160
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  1. Chapter 26 George W. Ewing
  2. pp. 161-165
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  1. Chapter 27 Margaret Tate Waring
  2. pp. 166-168
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  1. Chapter 28 Rollo K. Newsom
  2. pp. 169-171
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  1. Chapter 29 Sylvia Gann Mahoney
  2. pp. 172-175
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  1. Chapter 30 Mary R. Harris
  2. pp. 176-206
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  1. Presidents of the Texas Folklore Society
  2. pp. 207-210
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  1. Publications of the Texas Folklore Society
  2. pp. 211-214
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  1. Certificate of Incorporation with Amendments and By-Laws
  2. pp. 215-218
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 219-231
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  1. Images
  2. p. 232
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  1. National Endowment for the Humanities Funding Information
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  1. Back Cover
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781574411225
Related ISBN
9781574411225
MARC Record
OCLC
664406776
Launched on MUSE
2019-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
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