In this Book

summary
Since Machiavelli, historians and political theorists have sought the sources of the stability that earned for Venice the appellation La Serenissima, the Most Serene Republic. In Patricians and Popolani, Dennis Romano looks to the private lives of early Renaissance Venetians for an explanation. Fourteenth-century Venice escaped the tumultuous upheavals of the other Italian city-republics, Romano contends, because the patricians and common people of the city did not divide sharply along class or factional lines in their personal associations. Rather, Venetians of the era moved in a variety of intersecting social networks that were shaped and influenced by an overriding sense of civic community. Drawing on the private archives of Venice—notarial registers, collections of testaments, and records of estates maintained by the procurators of San Marco—Romano analyzes the primary social bonds in the lives of the city's inhabitants. In separate chapters, Patricians and Popolani examines the forms of association in everyday Venetian life: marriage and family structure; artisan workshops and relations among tradesmen; the role of the parish clergy and the "sacred networks" that formed around convents, hospitals, and confraternities; and neighborhood and patron–client ties. By the beginning of the fifteenth century, Romano argues, all these networks of association had been transformed as a new hierarchical spirit took hold and overwhelmed the older, more freewheeling tendencies of Venetian society. The old sense of community yielded to a new and equally compelling sense of place, and La Serenissima remained stable throughout the later Renaissance.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. New Copyright
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  1. Half Title
  2. p. i
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  1. Fm
  2. p. ii
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  1. Dedication
  2. p. iii
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  1. Epigraph
  2. p. v
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  1. Title Page
  2. p. vii
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  1. Copyright
  2. p. viii
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. p. xi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xiv
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  1. Half Title 1
  2. p. xv
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  1. One: Community and Conflict in Early Renaissance Venice
  2. pp. 1-11
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  1. Two: Urban Form and Social Stratification: The Civitas Venetiarum
  2. pp. 12-38
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  1. Three: Family Structure and Marriage Ties
  2. pp. 39-64
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  1. Four: The World of Work: Guild Structure and Artisan Networks
  2. pp. 65-90
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  1. Five: The Parochial Clergy and Communities of the Sacred
  2. pp. 91-118
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  1. Six: Vicinanza and Amicizia: Neighborhoods and Patronage in Early Renaissance Venice
  2. pp. 119-140
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  1. Seven: From Community to Hierarchy: The Transformation of Venetian Social Ties
  2. pp. 141-158
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 159-197
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 199-213
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 215-220
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781421430317
Related ISBN
9781421431468
MARC Record
OCLC
1123905819
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-17
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
Funder
Mellon/NEH / Hopkins Open Publishing: Encore Editions
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC-ND
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