In this Book

summary
A look at the antebellum history and architecture of the little-known sugar industry of East Florida
 
From the late eighteenth century to early 1836, the heart of the Florida sugar industry was concentrated in East Florida, between the St. Johns River and the Atlantic Ocean. Producing the sweetest sugar, molasses, and rum, at least 22 sugar plantations dotted the coastline by the 1830s. This industry brought prosperity to the region—employing farm hands, slaves, architects, stone masons, riverboats and their crews, shop keepers, and merchant traders. But by January 1836, Native American attacks of the Second Seminole War, intending to rid the Florida frontier of settlers, devastated the whole sugar industry.
 
Although sugar works again sprang up in other Florida regions just prior to the Civil War, the competition from Louisiana and the Caribbean blocked a resurgence of sugar production for the area. The sugar industry would never regain its importance in East Florida—only two of the original sugar works were ever rebuilt. Today, remains of this once thriving industry are visible in a few parks. Some are accessible but others lie hidden, slowly disintegrating and almost forgotten. Archaeological, historical, and architectural research in the last decade has returned these works to their once prominent place in Florida’s history, revealing the beauty, efficiency of design, as well as early industrial engineering. Equally important is what can be learned of the lives of those associated with the sugar works and the early plantation days along the East Florida frontier

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Frontmatter
  2. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Contents
  2. p. vii
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-xi
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. xiii-xv
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Part I. Sugar and Plantations
  2. p. 1
  1. 1. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-9
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 2. Plantations as Industrial Complexes
  2. pp. 10-13
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 3. Sweet Cane
  2. pp. 14-34
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 4. Sugar in East Florida
  2. pp. 35-44
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Part II. The Architecture of East Florida Sugar Plantations
  2. p. 45
  1. 5. Architectural Influences
  2. pp. 47-51
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 6. The Spanish Trains: Oswald/Yonge Three Chimneys and McHardy
  2. pp. 52-72
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 7. The Adaptive Sugar Works: Dummett and Spring Garden
  2. pp. 73-97
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 8. The Fully Evolved Sugar Works: Bulow, Macrae, Cruger-DePeyster, and Dunlawton
  2. pp. 98-147
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. 9. The End of an Industry
  2. pp. 148-153
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. References Cited
  2. pp. 155-167
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Index
  2. pp. 169-176
  3. restricted access
    • Download PDF Download
    contents

Additional Information

ISBN
9780817382872
Related ISBN(s)
9780817316969, 9780817355920
MARC Record
OCLC
764543042
Pages
192
Launched on MUSE
2012-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No

Copyright

Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.