In this Book

summary
The European dramatic tradition rests on a group of religious dramas that appeared between the tenth and twelfth centuries. These dramas, of interest in themselves, are also important for the light they shed on three historical and critical problems: the relation of drama to ritual, the nature of dramatic form, and the development of representational techniques. Hardison's approach is based on the history of the Christian liturgy, on critical theories concerning the kinship of ritual and drama, and on close analysis of the chronology and content of the texts themselves. Beginning with liturgical commentaries of the ninth century, Hardison shows that writers of the period consciously interpreted the Mass and cycle of the church year in dramatic terms. By reconstructing the services themselves, he shows that they had an emphatic dramatic structure that reached its climax with the celebration of the Resurrection. Turning to the history of the Latin Resurrection play, Hardison suggests that the famous Quem quaeritis—the earliest of all medieval dramas—is best understood in relation to the baptismal rites of the Easter Vigil service. He sets forth a theory of the original form and function of the play based on the content of the earliest manuscripts as well as on vestigial ceremonial elements that survive in the later ones. Three texts from the eleventh and twelfth centuries are analyzed with emphasis on the change from ritual to representational modes. Hardison discusses why the form inherited from ritual remained unchanged, while the technique became increasingly representational. In studying the earliest vernacular dramas, Hardison examines the use of nonritual materials as sources of dramatic form, the influence of representational concepts of space and time on staging, and the development of nonceremonial techniques for composition of dialogue. The sudden appearance of these elements in vernacular drama suggests the existence of a hitherto unsuspected vernacular tradition considerably older than the earliest surviving vernacular plays.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
  2. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. New Copyright
  2. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Half Title
  2. p. i
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Frontispiece
  2. p. iii
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Title Page
  2. p. iv
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Copyright
  2. p. v
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Dedication
  2. p. vi
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-xi
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Contents
  2. p. xiii
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Half Title 1
  2. p. xv
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Essay I: Darwin, Mutations, and the Origin of Medieval Drama
  2. pp. 1-34
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Essay II: The Mass as Sacred Drama
  2. pp. 35-79
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Essay III: The Lenten Agon: From Septuagesima to Good Friday
  2. pp. 80-138
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Essay IV: Christus Victor: From Holy Saturday to Low Sunday
  2. pp. 139-177
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Essay V: The Early History of the Quem Quaeritis
  2. pp. 178-219
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Essay VI: From Quem Quaeritis to Resurrection Play
  2. pp. 220-252
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Essay VII: The Vernacular Tradition: Form, Episode, Dialogue
  2. pp. 253-283
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Epilogue: A Note on the Continuity of Ritual Form in European Drama
  2. pp. 284-292
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Appendix I: Translations
  2. pp. 293-306
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Appendix II: Chronological Index of Early Liturgical Plays
  2. pp. 307-316
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents
  1. Index
  2. pp. 317-328
  3. open access
    • View HTML View
    • Download PDF Download
    contents

Additional Information

ISBN
9781421430478
Related ISBN
9781421430874
MARC Record
OCLC
1122194322
Launched on MUSE
2019-10-07
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
Funder
Mellon/NEH / Hopkins Open Publishing: Encore Editions
Creative Commons
CC-BY-NC-ND
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.