Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

Illustrations

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pp. vii-xi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

I found my first shell-tempered potsherd when I was about ten years old. It came from a hillock in a field that was used to grow strawberry plants less than a half mile from my house. The hillock was also the location of a small Mississippian farmstead or hamlet overlooking the East Fork White River, in an equally small farming hamlet (population fifty-six in 1967) in southwestern...

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1. Introduction

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pp. 1-19

The prehistoric town of Angel, located on the Ohio River in Vanderburgh County, Indiana, was the central community of a Late Prehistoric, Mississippian Tradition chiefdom. It was one of four such towns, larger and smaller, in the lower Ohio Valley (Figure 1.1). Angel has been the subject of professional archaeological scrutiny for more than a half century. After its purchase by the...

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2. Pottery Studies in Mississippian Archaeology

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pp. 20-32

Pottery has long been one of archaeology’s important tools in chronology building, not just in the Southeast or in Mississippian research, but in the case of any prehistoric society that made pots. With few exceptions, pottery sherds comprise the most numerous class of artifacts from a pottery-making society. The many uses people have found for pots, the numerous shapes in which they...

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3. Decorated Plates, Bottles, Bowls, and Jars

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pp. 33-126

Potters and cooks at Angel made and used five basic vessel forms—plates, bottles, bowls, jars, and pans. Mississippian plates are similar in shape to the dinner plates in the kitchen cabinets or china cupboards of many American homes. They have flattened, outflaring rims and wells. Late Prehistoric bowls also have modern counterparts and are usually hemispherical or cylindrical in...

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4. Closed and Open Handles

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pp. 127-163

The lip area of Mississippian bowls and jars often bears handles that aid in covering and moving the vessels. A closed handle, like the handle on a coffee cup, is a cylindrical or flattened clay loop attached to the vessel at both the top and bottom of the loop. Open handles are attached to the vessel at one end or point; they are much like the tabs on modern baking...

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5. Angel Negative Painted Plates

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pp. 164-203

In their discussion “Negative Painting in the Eastern United States,” Phillips, Ford, and Griffin (1951:173–177) made the following observation: “Whether this term [Angel Negative Painted] will actually be used by Glenn A. Black in his description of the predominant painted ware at the Angel Site in southwestern Indiana is not known, but certainly there is present at that site a phenomenally...

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6. Chronology of the Angel Site and Phase

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pp. 204-233

This chapter presents a pottery chronology for the Angel site and phase. As I noted at the beginning of Chapter 1, there have been many studies of the Angel society, and they have provided a great deal of information. They lacked a time scale with which to examine issues related to the growth and decline of Angel, however. Researchers were forced to treat the four centuries assigned to the site...

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7. Angel in Regional Perspective

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pp. 234-244

The research reported in this volume provides a systematic descriptive and chronological analysis of the pottery assemblage from Angel. In this final chapter, I want to address three interrelated issues: the possibility of ancestor-descendant relationships between the Angel phase and the preceding Yankeetown phase and between the Angel phase and the succeeding Caborn-Welborn...

Appendix A: Summary of the Excavations at Angel: 1939–1989

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pp. 245-251

Appendix B: Radiocarbon and Thermoluminescence Dates for the Angel Site and Phase

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pp. 253-257

Appendix C: Radiocarbon Dates from the Kincaid—Lower Tennessee-Cumberland Region

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pp. 259-262

Appendix D: Catalog and Sherd Numbers of the Illustrated Specimens

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pp. 263-270

References Cited

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pp. 271-286

Index

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pp. 287-294