Cover

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Frontmatter

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. vii-ix

Henry Hotze began his translation of Gobineau’s Essai by reminding us that “A good book seldom requires, and a bad one never deserves, a long preface.” While certainly endorsing this sage advice, a few points regarding the purpose, sources, and style of this present work must be offered. Over the years, Hotze has undergone several investigations. The earliest accounts came from his contemporaries...

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Introduction: Henry Hotze, Confederate Propagandist

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pp. 1-34

In late summer of 1855, a youthful Henry Hotze was en route to Philadelphia to hand deliver his completed manuscript of an English translation of Count Arthur de Gobineau’s Essai sur L’inégalité des Races Humaines. Hotze carried with him a letter of introduction from his friend and mentor, Dr. Josiah C. Nott. In this correspondence, Nott referred to Hotze...

PART ONE: “A CONSCIOUSNESS OF DOING SOMETHING FINE”

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Three Months in the Confederate Army

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pp. 37-85

The twenty- third of April, 1861, is a day long to be remembered in the local traditions of the city of Mobile. About noon the rumor had fl ashed through the town that the Governor of Alabama had accepted the services of the Mobile Cadets, and of another volunteer company, and had summoned both to repair instantly to the capital of the state, then also the provisional capital...

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The CADET Letters to the Mobile Register

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pp. 86-106

It will be gratifying to our friends at home to know how comfortably situated we are. To say that we are comfortable may not perhaps convey a strictly correct idea, but we feel so, which amounts to the same thing. Comfort, like all others, is a relative term, and Providence has blessed man with a power of adapting himself to circumstances, to cultivate which is the great secret of human happiness...

PART TWO: “WHAT PREVENTS THE RECOGNITION OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES?”

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An “Apology” to the Tribune

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pp. 109-110

The Mobile Tribune accuses one of the editorial corps of the Register of being nothing but a foreigner and therefore having no business with American politics— not exactly in these words but unmistakably with that meaning. The offending party humbly pleads guilty to that crime, and deprecating the Tribune’s rigor suggests as extenuating circumstance that even he, in the hottest days...

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Henry Hotze’s Commission

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pp. 111-112

SIR: Having appointed you commercial agent of the Confederate States at London, I herewith enclose your commission. You will, with as little delay as possible, proceed to your post, and immediately after your arrival report yourself to our commissioner, the Hon. James M. Mason,5 to whom you will exhibit your credentials...

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The “Washington’s Birthday” Leader

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pp. 113-118

SIR: I have the honor to enclose my first contribution to the English press, the leading editorial in yesterday’s issue of Lord Palmerston’s organ, the Morning Post.7 In reading it, you will make due allowances for the necessity under which I felt myself of studiously maintaining an English point of view, and not advancing too far beyond recognized public opinion...

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“The Question of Recognition of the Confederate States”

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pp. 119-132

Sir, Every British heart re- echoed the hopeful wish expressed by Earl Russell on Monday last in the House of Lords, that “within three months, perhaps even less, we may see the close of the civil war in America.”12 But many joined in the noble earl’s wish who did not share his hope. The contest, all men know, can close in but one of two manners, either by the admission...

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The Index on Recognition

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pp. 133-143

It has been thought advisable to issue this Journal for the following reasons: In the first place, there are many millions of people, kinsmen of the people of this country, who have now been for some time shut off from all communication with the rest of the civilized world. To any statement of the loss and suffering they endure, it will be replied, that these are the consequences...

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The Ebb and Flow of Recognition: Diplomatic and Personal Correspondence

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pp. 144-157

SIR: I am able, today, to write in a much more cheerful spirit than in my last of February 28. The fall of Fort Donelson, paradoxical as the assertion may appear, has been useful in its effects upon the public opinion.24 It has proved to our friends here the necessity of greater energy of action, and it has furnished food for serious reflection to that vast majority of the British public...

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A Primer on Southern Society

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pp. 158-160

DEAR Sir: As the political director, if not nominal editor, of the Index I beg to acknowledge your favor of yesterday, correcting certain errors into which the Paris correspondent of that paper has fallen in referring to your biweekly letters to La Patrie from Providence, R.I....

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The Genius of the Editor

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pp. 161-164

The cherished ambition of my life is to make the Index a worthy representative in journalism of the highest ideal of that Southern civilization which is as yet only in its infancy. This ideal is as far removed from a blind idolatry of the past as from the conceited contempt of the past, which characterizes our age...

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A Plan to Take the Index to America

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pp. 165-166

My present object in writing to you is to consult you regarding the feasibility of an idea which the suddenly altered aspect of affairs and the possibly impending political revolution in America, have of late caused me to take into serious consideration. If, what I do not believe, but what has now entered into the province of possible contingencies, the armed resistance of the South...

PART THREE: “THE NATURAL HISTORY OF MAN”

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Excerpt from “Analytical Introduction and Copious Historical Notes”

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pp. 169-176

Whether we contemplate the human family from the point of view of the naturalist or of the philosopher, we are struck with the marked dissimilarity of the various groups. The obvious physical characteristics, by which we distinguish what are termed different races, are not more clearly defined than the psychical diversities observable among them. “If a person,” says the learned...

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“The Position and Treatment of Women among the Various Races of Men as Proof of Their Moral and Intellectual Diversity”

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pp. 177-180

The reader will pardon me if to Mr. Gobineau’s scale of gradation in point of beauty and physical strength, I add another as accurate, I think, if not more so, and certainly as interesting.9 I allude to the manner in which the weaker sex is regarded and treated among the various races of men. In the words of Van Amringe, “From the brutal New Hollander...

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The Register Reviews Moral and Intellectual Diversity of Races

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pp. 181-182

This is a bold, original, and learned work, which has created quite a sensation in Philadelphia, where it was published, and if we are not greatly deceived, is destined to take a much deeper hold upon readers of the South. The question of original Unity or Diversity of Races is not one discussed by the author; but he takes the human family up where history first finds them...

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Letters to Gobineau

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pp. 183-191

Monsieur le Comte, In virtue of my office as your interpreter before the American public, and having various matters to communicate which require a direct correspondence, I take the liberty of personally addressing you. Du reste, les amis de nos amis sont nos amis,11 and I may safely refer you to Mr. Gliddon and Dr. Nott,...

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The Index on Racialism

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pp. 192-220

The emancipation scheme of the North is condemned in advance by the insincerity of its motive, since its authors scarcely care to dent that they regard it purely as a military measure to “crush the rebellion”; and Mr. Lincoln has himself publicly declared, that if he could restore the Union by freeing none of the slaves, or by freeing some, and leaving the others in slavery...

Appendix: Original Descriptive Roll of the Mobile Cadets, Co. A, Third Alabama Regiment Infantry

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pp. 221-224

Notes

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pp. 225-242

Index

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pp. 243-251