In this Book

Myth, Symbol, and Colonial Encounter
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summary
From the time of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, people of British origin have shared the area of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island, traditionally called Acadia, with Eastern Canada's Algonkian-speaking peoples, the Mi'kmaq. This historical analysis of colonial Acadia from the perspective of symbolic and mythic existence will be useful to those interested in Canadian history, native Canadian history, religion in Canada, and history of religion.

Table of Contents

  1. CONTENTS
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  1. INTRODUCTION
  2. pp. 1-7
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  1. CHAPTER 1 – RELIGION AND THE COLONIAL WORLD
  2. pp. 9-25
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  1. CHAPTER 2 – LET NOT THY LEFT HAND KNOW WHAT THY RIGHT HAND DOETH
  2. pp. 27-52
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  1. CHAPTER 3 – THE SHROUDING OF AMBIGUITY
  2. pp. 53-71
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  1. CHAPTER 4 – THE BOUNDARIES OF PURITY
  2. pp. 73-96
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  1. CHAPTER 5 – AT HOME IN COLONIAL ACADIA
  2. pp. 97-107
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  1. CONCLUSION – STILL STRANGERS
  2. pp. 109-115
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  1. BIBLIOGRAPHY
  2. pp. 117-129
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  1. INDEX OF NAMES
  2. pp. 131-133
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