In this Book

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In the middle of the fourteenth century a devastating epidemic of plague, commonly known in European history as the "Black Death," swept over the Eurasian continent. This book, based principally on Arabic sources, establishes the means of transmission and the chronology of the plague pandemic's advance through the Middle East.
The prolonged reduction of population that began with the Black Death was of fundamental significance to the social and economic history of Egypt and Syria in the later Middle Ages. The epidemic's spread suggests a remarkable destruction of human life in the fourteenth century, and a series of plague recurrences appreciably retarted population growth and the following century and a half, impoverishing Middle Eastern society. Social reactions illustrate the strength of traditional Muslism values and practices, social organization, and cohesiveness. The sudden demographic decline brought about long-term as well as immediate economic adjustments in land values, salaries, and commerce.
Michael W. Dols is Assistant Professor of History at California State University, Hayward.

Originally published in 1977.

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Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title, Copyright, Dedication
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. xi-xii
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  1. Abbreviations
  2. pp. xiii-xvi
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  1. List of Maps
  2. pp. xvii-2
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  1. I. Introduction
  2. pp. 3-12
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  1. II. Plague in the Middle East
  2. pp. 13-67
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  1. III. The Nature of Plague
  2. pp. 68-83
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  1. IV. Medieval Muslim Interpretations of Plague
  2. pp. 84-142
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  1. V. The Demographic Effects of Plague in Egypt and Syria
  2. pp. 143-235
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  1. VI. Urban Communal Behavior During the Black Death
  2. pp. 236-254
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  1. VII. The Economic Consequences of the Black Death
  2. pp. 255-280
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  1. VIII. Conclusion
  2. pp. 281-302
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  1. Appendices
  1. Appendix One. Recurrences of Plague in the Period Subsequent to the Black Death: 750-922/1349-1517
  2. pp. 305-314
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  1. Appendix Two. The Arabic Terminology for Plague
  2. pp. 315-319
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  1. Appendix Three. The Arabic Manuscript Sources for the History of Plague from the Black Death to the Nineteenth Century
  2. pp. 320-336
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 337-374
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 375-390
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780691196688
Related ISBN
9780691031071
MARC Record
OCLC
1083531994
Pages
408
Launched on MUSE
2020-01-01
Language
English
Open Access
No
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