In this Book

summary
Each time a border is crossed there are cultural, political and social issues to be considered. Applying the metaphor of the ‘border crossing’ from one temporal or spatial territory into another, this book examines the way classic Russian texts have been altered to suit new cinematic environments. In these essays, international scholars examine how political and economic circumstances – from a shifting Soviet political landscape to the perceived demands of American and European markets – have played a crucial role in dictating how filmmakers transpose their cinematic hypertext into a new environment. Rather than focus on the degree of accuracy or fidelity with which these films address their originating texts, this innovative collection explores the role of ideological, political and other cultural pressures that can affect the transformation of literary narratives into cinematic offerings.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Half Title, Dedication, Title Page, Copyright
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. List of Figures
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Notes on the Contributors
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction: Filming Russian Classics—Challenges and Opportunities
  2. Alexander Burry
  3. pp. 1-16
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  1. Chapter 1. Across the Russian Border
  2. Thomas Leitch
  3. pp. 17-39
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  1. Chapter 2. Dostoevskii’s “White Nights”: The Dreamer Goes Abroad
  2. Ronald Meyer
  3. pp. 40-63
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  1. Chapter 3. On Not Showing Dostoevskii’s Work: Robert Bresson’s Pickpocket
  2. Olga Peters Hasty
  3. pp. 64-84
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  1. Chapter 4. Stealing the Scene: Crime as Confession in Robert Bresson’s Pickpocket
  2. S. Ceilidh Orr
  3. pp. 85-101
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  1. Chapter 5. The Eye-deology of Trauma: Killing Anna Karenina Softly
  2. Yuri Leving
  3. pp. 102-120
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  1. Chapter 6. “A Vicious Circle”: Karen Shakhnazarov’s Ward no. 6
  2. Alexander Burry
  3. pp. 121-139
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  1. Chapter 7. A Slap in the Face of American Taste: Transporting He Who Gets Slapped to American Audiences
  2. Frederick H. White
  3. pp. 140-164
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  1. Chapter 8. Against Adaptation? The Strange Case of (Pod) Poruchik Kizhe
  2. Alastair Renfrew
  3. pp. 165-187
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  1. Chapter 9. Chasing the Wealth: The Americanization of Il’f and Petrov’s The Twelve Chairs
  2. Robert Mulcahy
  3. pp. 188-201
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  1. Chapter 10. Fassbinder’s Nabokov – From Text to Action: Repressed Homosexuality, Provocative Jewishness, and Anti-German Sentiment
  2. Dennis Ioffe
  3. pp. 202-222
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  1. Chapter 11. “The Soviet Abroad (That We Lost)”: The Fate of Vasilii Aksenov’s Cult Novel A Starry Ticket on Paper and on Screen
  2. Otto Boele
  3. pp. 223-238
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  1. Conclusion: Passport Control—Departing on a Cinematic Journey
  2. Frederick H. White
  3. pp. 239-264
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  1. Bibliography
  2. pp. 265-280
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  1. Filmography
  2. pp. 281-287
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 288-298
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781474411431
Related ISBN
9781474411424
MARC Record
OCLC
1103684063
Pages
272
Launched on MUSE
2019-08-02
Language
English
Open Access
Yes
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