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summary
Long before the founding of the Jamestown, Virginia, colony and its Starving Time of 1609–1610—one of the most famous cannibalism narratives in North American colonial history—cannibalism, and accusations of cannibalism, played an important role in the history of food, hunger, and moral outrage. Why did colonial invaders go out of their way to accuse women of cannibalism? What challenges did Spaniards face in trying to explain Eucharist rites to Native peoples? What roles did preconceived notions about non-Europeans play in inflating accounts of cannibalism in Christopher Columbus’s reports as they moved through Italian merchant circles?

Asking questions such as these and exploring what it meant to accuse someone of eating people as well as how cannibalism rumors facilitated slavery and the rise of empires, To Feast on Us as Their Prey posits that it is impossible to separate histories of cannibalism from the role food and hunger have played in the colonization efforts that shaped our modern world.

 

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Series Editors' Preface
  2. Jennifer Jensen Wallach and Michael Wise
  3. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-xii
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  1. Introduction. "Cannibalism and . . ."
  2. Rachel B. Herrmann
  3. pp. 3-18
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  1. Chapter 1. Rituals of Consumption: Cannibalism and Native American Oral Traditions in Southeastern North America
  2. Gregory D. Smithers
  3. pp. 19-36
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  1. Chapter 2. First Reports of New World Cannibalism in the Italian Mercantile and Diplomatic Correspondence
  2. Elena Daniele
  3. pp. 37-58
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  1. Chapter 3. Sex and Cannibalism: The Politics of Carnal Relations between Europeans and American "Anthropophagites" in the Caribbean and Mexico
  2. Kelly L. Watson
  3. pp. 59-80
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  1. Chapter 4. Spaniards, Cannibals, and the Eucharist in the New World
  2. Rebecca Earle
  3. pp. 81-96
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  1. Chapter 5. "And Greedily Deuoured Them": The Cannibalism Discourse and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1536–1612
  2. Jessica S. Hower
  3. pp. 97-114
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  1. Chapter 6. Imperial Appetites: Cannibalism and Early Modern Theatre
  2. Matt Williamson
  3. pp. 115-134
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  1. Chapter 7. Retelling the Legend of Sawney Bean: Cannibalism in Eighteenth-Century England
  2. Julie Gammon
  3. pp. 135-152
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  1. Chapter 8. Honor Eating: Frank Lestringant, Michel de Montaigne, and the Physics of Symbolic Exchange
  2. Robert Appelbaum
  3. pp. 153-174
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  1. Chapter 9. Conspicuous Consumptions in Atlantic Africa: Andrew Battell's Fearsome Tales of Hunger, Cannibalism, and Survival
  2. Jared Staller
  3. pp. 175-194
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  1. Chapter 10 "The Black People Were Not Good to Eat": Cannibalism, Cooperation, and Hunger at Sea
  2. Rachel B. Herrmann
  3. pp. 195-214
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  1. Conclusion. Beyond Jamestown
  2. Rachel B. Herrmann
  3. pp. 215-220
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  1. Notes
  2. pp. 221-270
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 271-272
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 273-282
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781610756563
Related ISBN
9781682260814
MARC Record
OCLC
1043151613
Pages
250
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-05
Language
English
Open Access
No
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