In this Book

summary
For undergraduates following any course of study, it is essential to develop the ability to write effectively. Yet the processes by which students become more capable and ready to meet the challenges of writing for employers, the wider public, and their own purposes remain largely invisible. Developing Writers in Higher Education shows how learning to write for various purposes in multiple disciplines leads college students to new levels of competence.

This volume draws on an in-depth study of the writing and experiences of 169 University of Michigan undergraduates, using statistical analysis of 322 surveys, qualitative analysis of 131 interviews, use of corpus linguistics on 94 electronic portfolios and 2,406 pieces of student writing, and case studies of individual students to trace the multiple paths taken by student writers. Topics include student writers’ interaction with feedback; perceptions of genre; the role of disciplinary writing; generality and certainty in student writing; students’ concepts of voice and style; students’ understanding of multimodal and digital writing; high school’s influence on college writers; and writing development after college. The digital edition offers samples of student writing, electronic portfolios produced by student writers, transcripts of interviews with students, and explanations of some of the analysis conducted by the contributors.

This is an important book for researchers and graduate students in multiple fields. Those in writing studies get an overview of other longitudinal studies as well as key questions currently circulating. For linguists, it demonstrates how corpus linguistics can inform writing studies. Scholars in higher education will gain a new perspective on college student development. The book also adds to current understandings of sociocultural theories of literacy and offers prospective teachers insights into how students learn to write. Finally, for high school teachers, this volume will answer questions about college writing.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication,
  2. pp. i-vi
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. vii-x
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Introduction
  2. Anne Ruggles Gere
  3. pp. 1-20
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  1. Section One: Writing Is a Rhetorical and Social Activity
  1. Introduction to Section One
  2. pp. 21-28
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  1. One: toward critical engagement: affect and action in student interactions with instructor feedback
  2. Emily Wilson and Justine Post
  3. pp. 29-55
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  1. Two: “a good development thing”: a longitudinal analysis of peer review and authority in undergraduate writing
  2. Benjamin Keating
  3. pp. 56-80
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  1. Section Two: Genre Awareness Contributes to Student Writing Development
  1. Introduction to Section Two
  2. pp. 81-88
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  1. Three: “kinds of writing”: student conceptions of academic and creative forms of writing development
  2. Lizzie Hutton and Gail Gibson
  3. pp. 89-112
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  1. Four: complicating the relationship between disciplinary expertise and writing development
  2. Ryan McCarty
  3. pp. 113-130
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  1. Section Three: Writing (and Writing Instruction) Benefits from Attention to Language-Level Features
  1. Introduction to Section Three
  2. pp. 131-138
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  1. Five: generality and certainty in undergraduate writing over time: a corpus study of epistemic stance across levels, disciplines, and genres (Laura L. Aull)
  2. Laura L. Aull
  3. pp. 139-162
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  1. Six: tracking students’ developing conceptions of voice and style in writing (Zak Lancaster)
  2. Zak Lancaster
  3. pp. 163-184
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  1. Section Four: All Writers Have More to Learn
  1. Introduction to Section Four
  2. pp. 185-192
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  1. Seven: grace: a case study of resourcefulness and resilience (Anna V. Knutson)
  2. Anna V. Knutson
  3. pp. 193-216
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  1. Eight: “my writing writing”: student conceptions of writing and self-perceptions of multimodal compositional development (Naomi Silver)
  2. Naomi Silver
  3. pp. 217-246
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  1. Section Five: Writing Development Precedes and Extends Beyond College
  1. Introduction to Section Five
  2. pp. 247-254
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  1. Nine: reaching back to move beyond the “typical” student profile: the influence of high school in undergraduate writing development (Sarah Swofford)
  2. Sarah Swofford
  3. pp. 255-280
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  1. Ten: writing beyond the university
  2. Anne Ruggles Gere
  3. pp. 281-312
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  1. Conclusion
  2. Anne Ruggles Gere
  3. pp. 313-328
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  1. Appendices
  1. Appendix 1: Demographic Information
  2. pp. 329-330
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  1. Appendix 2: Sweetland Minor in Writing Program Details
  2. pp. 331-334
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  1. Appendix 3: Sample of Writing Development Surveys
  2. pp. 335-342
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  1. Appendix 4: Samples of Interview Questions
  2. pp. 343-348
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  1. Appendix 5: Interview Codebook
  2. pp. 349-352
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  1. Appendix 6: List of Participants by Name and Chapter
  2. pp. 353-356
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 357-360
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 361-370
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Additional Information

ISBN
9780472901036
Related ISBN(s)
9780472037384, 9780472124817, 9780472131242
MARC Record
OCLC
1067230824
Pages
440
Launched on MUSE
2018-12-20
Language
English
Open Access
Yes

Copyright

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